College Students Need Remedial Classes in How to Be Adults

Is it any wonder?

pajamaboy

From The Daily Beast: Is 18 years enough time to prepare for the stresses of being an adult? For America’s increasingly fragile college students—thousands of whom are returning to campus in the next two weeks—the answer is a panic-stricken no.

You may recall last year’s horror stories about easily traumatized students whose deteriorating mental health conditions were overburdening their universities’ counselors. This semester, to relieve some of the expected stress—on both the students and the campus’s mental health services—schools are getting creative. East Carolina University, for instance, will provide optional stress-management classes: or, as one news site described it, remedial education in how to be an adult.

Many students, it seems, are not prepared for the transition “from home life to college life and into their adulthood,” according to an ECU Board of Trustees briefing. The report continues:

“The resulting stress negatively impacts their ability to adjust to their new environment and puts them at risk of experiencing mental health issues, falling into substance abuse, and potentially experiencing academic failure.”

The report cites startling numbers that would appear to justify these concerns: In the 2015-16 academic year, counseling appointments increased 16 percent over the previous year at ECU; therapy cases increased 10 percent; and crisis appointments—situations characterized as mental health emergencies—increased by a whopping 53 percent. Requests for disability accommodations on tests also increased by 26 percent, even though the number of registered disabled students increased only slightly.

For ECU, the solution is “cognitive-affective stress management training,” which is a really fancy way of saying students need to learn to chill out instead of slipping into inconsolable depression whenever they get a B on a test, have a disagreement with a roommate, or encounter something in the curriculum that offends them.

offend

A reporter for the Greenville, North Carolina, Daily Reflector who attended the Board of Trustees meeting described the program as “adulting” class. ECU wasn’t happy with that characterization of the plan. The news report “isn’t fully accurate,” ECU spokeswoman Jeannine Manning Hutson told The Daily Beast. “We don’t have an adulting program.”

Call it what you will—the university likes “resilience” education better—but the substance is the same: Too many university students seem to have missed out on vital conflict-resolution, de-stressing, and life-organizing techniques during their previous 12 years of schooling.

ECU is just one of many universities to struggle with, well, struggling students. Last year, Brown University’s student newspaper reported that the campus’s student protesters were suffering from panic attacks, suicidal thoughts, and failing grades because of the toll their activism was taking on them. Students at Oberlin College told The New Yorker that they were considering dropping out—they were fed up with the college’s inability to make accommodations for them due to mental anguish.

Even those who criticize the idea of a national “resilience” shortage nevertheless concede that students are swamping their counselors. The Huffington Post reported “slow, but consistent growth” in the number of students who say they have depression and anxiety.

What’s going on here? Lenore Skenazy, author of the book Free-Range Kids and a columnist for Reason.com, worries that helicopter parents and safety-obsessed K-12 administrators have babied an entire generation of young people so badly that by the time they get to college, they’re hopelessly dependent on guidance counselors and other authority figures. “Today’s children grow up with their elders ever present to organize the game, settle the scores and slice the snacks,” writes Skenazy.

Skenazy thinks kids could use more unstructured play time, which would teach them to solve problems on their own and might make them a little tougher. But that won’t help the 18-year-olds who have already hit adulthood and just aren’t up to the challenge.

And that’s a problem. Make no mistake: Emotionally coddled, easily offended, mentally traumatized students aren’t just a danger to themselves—they are exerting an injurious influence on the overall campus climate. They are the ones calling for what psychologist Jonathan Haidt describes as “vindictive protectiveness,” or institutional policies designed to protect students from psychological harm.

safe spaces

These policies are well-known to readers: trigger warnings that require professors to consider whether they are teaching objectionable material; safe spaces that appear on campus whenever a visiting speaker expresses a controversial idea; speech codes that thwart students’ efforts to exercise their First Amendment rights; and “Bias Response Teams” that investigate members of campus for saying the wrong things, even inadvertently.

Read the rest of the story here.

DCG

33 responses to “College Students Need Remedial Classes in How to Be Adults

  1. I didn’t have “peer pressure,” I had FATHER PRESSURE. Be that as it may, I suffer from a spiritual condition I see in these Big Babies, and that spiritual torpor is called ACEDIA.
    There can be no psychological solution to a spiritual problem! You cannot replace Moral Man with Sociological Man and expect anything to work! And here we have another example of the blind leading the blind! The morose leading the morbid! And the churlish leading the chickens! That’s right: These millenials are big fat chickens—afraid of life! Nothing a good old-fashioned ass-whuppin’ can’t cure!!!

    Liked by 4 people

    • Steven . . . You have gotten to the heart of the matter, far to many of todays young adults never got their butts warmed over anything. They are like rudder-less ships in the night . . . a danger to themselves, and those around. I think a lot of these babies need to stay at home, where they can be coddled by their parent(s) and just go to Community College. They are not fit to be out in the world.

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      • Yes, Auntie Lulu, and “rudder” is an excellent metaphor. They have no rudder, no COMPASS. After all these years of screwing it up, I have finally figured out that the Devil goes after these things in us FIRST.

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  2. SO VERY TRUE. I REMEMBER GROWING UP, MY LATE FATHER, WHOM I WOULD GIVE MY LIFE FOR, IF HE BE ALIVE TODAY, AS WELL AS MY LATE MOTHER; WELL HE MY FATHER HAD A LEATHER BELT. AT THE AGES I WOULD SAY ABOUT FOUR OR FIVE, HE TOOK HIS LEATHER BELT TO ME TWICE. THE SECOND TIME, I KNEW WHO WAS THE PARENT AND WHO WAS THE CHILD. NO I WAS NOT PHYSICALLY ABUSED, HE JUST MADE THE LEATHER BELT MEANINGFUL ENOUGH FOR ME TO KNOW BETTER. YOU CAN ONLY REASON WITH AN OFF SPRING, ON THE BASIS OF THAT OFF SPRING AGES, AND BECOMES MORE MATURE. YES, AND MY PARENTS LOVED ME MORE THAN ANYTHING IN THIS WORLD.

    Liked by 2 people

    • futuret . . . now I would say you had most excellent parents. The parent who cares enough to discipline, cares enough to see to it that their offspring is fit to take their place in society! Congratulations to you for having loving, motivated parents . . . far to many of todays children are stuck with mothers who can give birth, and fathers who are just sperm donors. Those of us who were lucky enough to hit the lottery and had real parents, are lucky indeed!

      Liked by 2 people

    • My father never took a belt or a yardstick to me; All he used was his hand—about six or seven times. (Late in life, Dad admitted that, had he to do it over again, he never would have hit a child, but he did not know what else to do at the time).
      The Bible says, “Spare the rod and spoil the child.” At this point, never having had children, I am glad that, despite my twelve years as a teacher, I never had to touch a student in anger. (In NYC, it’s against the law, and besides, these kids today would hit right back!) I think that an UNWAVERING STANDARD, judiciously applied, is the “rod” the Bible is referring to: My father had an unwavering standard that appealed to God and Human Reason, in that order. As a mere observer, that is what I think makes the difference.

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      • Yes, for me it was a matter of “respect”. I did not want my father to not respect me. He spanked me once with a razor strop. He shaved with a straight razor and the strop hung from the sink. He only had to do that once, because for ever after, when he got mad he’d go through the house, strop in hand, “popping” it. It made the hair on the back of my head stand up.

        I know in my case that my father had 12 brothers and sisters. He was raised in a house where there was a “division of labor”. The oldest girly was in charge of the girls. The oldest boy, the boys. If something happened bad enough that their mother had to get involved….., standby.

        The two biggest concepts were “respect” for others, your family, your neighbors. I was told never to “embarrass my family name”. On the other hand, a large family is good for defusing squabbles. I could go to an aunts house and “talk it out”. She’d call my dad and talk about it. We all loved each other very much.

        I remember thinking that it all started going to Hell in a hand basket when “malls” came in. Before that, when you shopped you had to go downtown to a store. Everyone could see you. Trust me, people I didn’t know had no compunction at all about chewing out a kid. In fact, if you were guilty, it would get back to my family and I’d get to hear it all over again.

        When the malls came in people just let their responsibilities “graze” there. No adult supervision.

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  3. Pingback: College Students Need Remedial Classes in How to Be Adults — Fellowship of the Minds | kommonsentsjane

  4. Twenty-five plus years ago, college felt like having my adulthood unwantedly revoked every day… and, obviously, it’s only gotten much worse then. What helicopter parenting, Common Core and everyone getting a trophy hath wrought…

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Maybe these colleges should worry more about trying to get these “CHILDREN” to avoid alcohol and drugs so they don’t do stupid things like DUI, Rape women or get killed. Works are not going to kill them, but alcohol and drugs will or at the least ruin their lives!!!!!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Talk about mixed messages! On the one hand, remedial classes to teach the college students how to be adults; on the other, precisely the same colleges are treating students like fragile children with forbidden speech and “safe zones” in case their delicate snowflake sensibilities are offended by “microaggressions”.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Quite literally insane, and if these stress mgt courses are anything like so-called grief counseling, the result will be an intensification and prolonging of stress, because whatever it is it’s blood in the water to mental health “professionals.”

      Liked by 3 people

    • Dr Eowyn . . . You are absolutely right . . . mixed messages that only screw up these “children” all the more. Better to throw them in the water and force them to swim (so to speak.) I doubt that I would fit in at a college or university, because “forbidden speech,” “safe zones,” and “microaggressions” seems like a foreign language to me. Far to many of these young adults were not taught the ethic of “shut up,” and get your butt in gear and work (by work I mean, school work, housework, laundry–folding towels, and clothing, yard work, painting fences, part-time jobs, any type of work that benefits the individual, or is beneficial to the family unit. These people were never taught these skills, and now being in the real world comes as a great mystery to them.

      Liked by 2 people

      • That’s a good point Lulu. When does this stuff start? Do their high school teachers implant this?

        I didn’t have to be told too many times that I wasn’t “owed” a college education before the concept sank in. I worked all the way through.

        Now, I’m not jealous of those whose parents fully-funded their eduction. I think that’s great. It just wasn’t my experience.

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  7. My memory of college years went something like this.

    You were no longer a “child”, i.e. “snowflake”
    You would sink or swim
    If you sank……, there was the Army
    Nobody, professors, counselors, administration, gave a fig.
    The same jerks existed inside as outside.
    You were expected to deal with it.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. These goobers will never find jobs in the private sector.

    Nobody in their right mind would hire them.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. YOU ARE STILL ALIVE AND WELL, SOME THINGS CAN NOT BE CHANGED, AND THIS IS ONE OF THEM. I AM SURE, WITHOUT KNOWING YOUR FATHER, HE HAD SHOWN MUCH LOVE THROUGHOUT THE YEARS. IT IS THE ONES THAT DO NOT CARE, WE HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. A PARENT SHOULD NEVER TRY TO MAKE A FRIEND OUT OF AN OFF SPRING, UNTIL THEY ARE FULLY GROWN ADULTS AND OUT ON THEIR OWN, HAVING FAMILIES OF THEIR OWN. THAT IS WHEN A CHILD CAN BECOME A FRIEND. A PARENT SHOULD NEVER OFFER A CHILD FRIENDSHIP, ONLY DEDICATION IN BEING A PARENT, AND PRESERVING THAT ROLE. THIS ELIMINATES MIXED MESSAGES AS AN INDIVIDUAL BEGINS THEIR LIFE PROCESS OF EVOLUTION TO MATURITY.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. sign up all dumbocraps who “need” the government to take care of them

    Like

  12. THIS IS WHY I AM TOTALLY AGAINST HOMOSEXUALS ADOPTING CHILDREN, SINGLE HETEROSEXUALS ADOPTING CHILDREN, AND THERE SHOULD NEVER BE ANY SPERM OR EGG BANKS. THOSE WHO THINK THEY CAN, IN REALITY CAN NOT, FOR IT REMOVES THE ORDER THAT OUR CREATOR HAS SET IN PLACE FOR US, AND LEADS TO FURTHER DISRUPTION AND DESTRUCTION. A CHILD SHOULD ALWAYS COME TO A HOME BEING ADOPTED WITH A TRULY BIOLOGICAL MOTHER AND TRULY BIOLOGICAL FATHER. I WAS NOT ADOPTED, BUT MY LATE MOTHER 5’1” LADY, AT THE AGE OF 41 DID GIVE BIRTH TO ME AND I WAS 9LBS 2 OUNCES ON JUNE 28, 1953. MY LATE FATHER BOUGHT A BUICK TO MATCH THE COLOR OF MY EYES; HOWEVER, DISCIPLINE WAS ALWAYS AROUND THE CORNER.

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  13. millennials….the generation where age of autism, vaccinations, single parent households, divorce, absent fathers, Big Brother, loss of security, Jesus pushed under the rug, increase in homosexual activity, increase in pharmaceutical and street drugs, loss of true freedom, increase in toxins in everything, acceptance of plastic surgery as the norm to be beautiful, use of tattoos to express oneself, use of credit as the norm (perpetual debt), technology everywhere, and “special snowflake” have all come home to roost.

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  14. My advice? Teach your kids either engineering skills or negotiating skills from an early age, and add in advanced hunting, trapping, fishing, butchering and shooting skills as they mature. Have more than 3 of ’em. We’ll need a new generation to rebuild society after the millennials are done with it, as all they’ve learned has been how to whine, lie, cheat, steal, manipulate and act like sociopaths. No good without our (crumbling) financial and legal systems that will no doubt collapse. An entire generation raised by liberals and video games… Do know how lethal that will be to our civilization. Don’t forget that most of them gobble down birth control, abort their young, or decide to become little homosexuals, so you’ll definitely have room in this world, God willing, for your own children. Most importantly, teach them the lessons of the Bible, and never neglect the laws contained within the Torah. They will need God to lead them even more than we do.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh and either live around responsible people and parents that know as well as you do that society can’t be sustained at the pace we’ve been going, or just buy a house out in the country with plenty of empty land around it. The last thing you want is “peer influence” from kids being indoctrinated with liberal fallacy and modernist trash culture peddling their political religion to them. No matter what you do, your own children can still be easy targets for being misled into thinking that the suicide culture is the “cool” thing to do. Keep it at bay until they’re old enough to know better, but don’t shelter them from knowing exactly what’s going on outside. They must also know their enemy, so that they may see deception and reject it.

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  15. SPOT ON!!! ALSO, AS SOON AS PARENTS HAVE THEIR FIRST CHILD, IT IS REHEARSAL TIME, TO BE ABLE TO ANSWER REPRODUCTIVE QUESTIONS ON HOW THAT CHILD ARRIVED IN THIS WORLD. UNLESS YOU ARE ABLE TO EXPLAIN TO A CHILD HOW HE OR SHE ARRIVED IN THIS WORLD, YOU SHOULD NOT HAVE CHILDREN. PARENTS MUST REALIZE THAT MAKING LOVE IS NOT UGLY IN ANY WAY, BUT ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL GIFTS THAT OUR CREATOR HAS GIVEN TO A MAN AND A WOMAN, AND IN MAKING LOVE, ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL ACTS THERE IS, A BEAUTIFUL HUMAN BEING IS BORN. PARENTS NEED TO REALIZE THIS, WHEN EXPLAINING TO THEIR CHILDREN. AS SOON AS THE FIRST CHILD IS BORN, IT IS TIME TO REHEARSE THOSE QUESTIONS THEY MAY ASK, AND NOT WAIT UNTIL LATER. IT IS ALSO A TIME, TO POSSIBLY PREPARE FOR THE DAY, THEY TOO MAY BECOME GRANDPARENTS, AND REALIZE THAT A CHILD MUST IN MOST CASES LEAVE HOME TO START A FAMILY OF THEIR OWN, AND FOLLOW THIS COMMAND OF OUR HEAVENLY FATHER YAHVEH. WHEN WE ARE CHILDREN WE CLING TO EVERY WORD OF OUR PARENTS, WHEN WE LEAVE HOME, WE DEVELOP OUR FAITH AND A RELATIONSHIP WITH OUR HEAVENLY FATHER YAHVEH, AND IT IS HE THAT NOW BECOMES OUR PARENT, AS THE ONES WE LEFT HOME REACH THEIR SUNSET IN LIFE.

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  16. This is not new, I have seen this in the post WW2 generation. I will be talking to one of them about a subject they find tough to handle…Example: One time I was telling a good friend that Prescott Bush was in on a banking deal with Adolf Hitlers Third Reich.
    —And this man literally got sick to his stomach over learning a truth that shook up their little world. I have read that this part of the problem, “not being able to absorb conflicting information like an adult,” is called “Cognitive Dissonance!”

    Reference:
    —Bush bank tied to Nazi funding – Washington Times
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2003/oct/17/20031017-110534-8149r/
    Oct 17, 2003 – Prescott Bush was one of seven directors of Union Banking Corp., a New York … Fritz Thyssen was an early financial supporter of Hitler, whose National Socialist German … There is deal of difficulty assessing just how involved grandaddy bush as there are years … Another great lesson from the Third Reich.
    —[PDF]Cognitive Dissonance
    https://web.mst.edu/~psyworld/general/dissonance/dissonance.pdf
    Cognitive Dissonance. The Theory. Almost half a century ago social psychologist Leon Festinger developed the cognitive dissonance theory (Festinger, 1957).

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  17. Pingback: College Students Need Remedial Classes in How to Be Adults — Fellowship of the Minds – On the Patio

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