14 medical conditions that can change your personality

Click on the embedded links for more on each disease.

(1) Alzheimer’s Disease:

Alzheimer’s, a type of senile dementia, affects your thinking, judgment, memory, and decision-making. It can make you feel confused and change how you act. Early on, you may be anxious or more easily annoyed. Over time, it can have more serious effects on your personality: A sweet, thoughtful person might become bossy and demanding, whereas someone who used to worry a lot or get stressed easily might become easygoing and content.

(2) Dementia with Lewy Bodies:

After Alzheimer’s, this is the next most common type of dementia. Clumps of unusual proteins, called Lewy bodies, form in the areas of your brain that control memory, movement, and thinking, thereby affecting you both mentally and physically. People who have it tend to become more passive, show little emotion, and lose interest in hobbies and other activities.

(3) Parkinson’s Disease:

While it might start as a little shakiness in your hand, Parkinson’s can eventually affect how you walk, talk, sleep, and think. Even early on, it can lead to things like obsessing over small details or a sudden carelessness. Later, you may seem absent-minded or not as social as you used to be. And it gets harder to keep your thoughts going in one direction.

(4) Huntington’s Disease:

This is an illness you’re born with, but it usually shows up in your 30s or 40s. It damages brain cells and affects every part of your life. You might have a hard time thinking clearly, or get angry to the point of hitting walls, or ignore basic things like brushing your teeth. And you may not even be aware it’s happening.

(5) Multiple Sclerosis (MS):

With this condition, your immune system attacks the nerves in your brain and spine. It can cause problems ranging from bladder issues to not being able to walk. In some cases, it can lead to a feeling of euphoria, where your happines is beyond normal and out of touch with reality. It can also bring on laughing or crying that seems out of control or not in line with how you really feel.

The thyroid makes hormones that tell your body how fast or slow to work. If it makes too much of those (hyperthyroidism), it can feel like someone stomped on the gas pedal. You might be irritable, anxious, and have big mood swings. If you don’t make enough of those hormones (hypothyroidism), your personality may seem flat. You may be forgetful and have a hard time thinking things through. It can have long-lasting effects on your brain if it’s not treated.

(7) Brain Tumor:

A tumor in your brain’s frontal lobe can affect the areas that handle personality, emotions, problem-solving, and memory. That can make you feel confused or forgetful. It can also cause mood swings, make you more aggressive, or trigger paranoid thoughts, like thinking people are “out to get you” when they’re not.

(8) Some Types of Cancer:

Tumors in the brain, spinal cord, and pituitary gland (which controls your hormone levels) can affect personality. So can adenocarcinoma, a type of cancerous tumor in cells that make mucus and other fluids which can occur in several parts of the body, including the breasts, colon, lungs, and pancreas.

(9) Stroke:

When blood flow to part of your brain gets cut off, the cells there don’t get enough oxygen and start to die. The effects depend on how long the stroke lasts and where in the brain it happens, which is why you need to get help ASAP. You might not be able to move some parts of your body, and it can change your personality in some ways. You might lose your patience more easily, have serious mood swings, or act more impulsively than you did before.

(10) Traumatic Brain Injury:

After a serious blow to the head, changes in personality can be a hidden symptom that happens over time. In more serious cases, you may seem like a different person, saying or doing things you never would have in the past.

(11) Depression:

As it comes on, this reaches into every part of your life. It not only affects your mood, but also the kinds of things you think about, your memory, and how you make decisions. It changes how you think about the world around you. It can be very different in men and women: Women often feel worthless, sad, and guilty, while men tend to feel tired, irritated, and angry.

(12) Obsessive-compulsive Disorder (OCD):

OCD makes you feel anxious and have thoughts and urges you just can’t stop. For example, you might wash your hands over and over again. You might doubt yourself a lot and take a long time to finish simple tasks. It can get worse if someone criticizes you, because that feeds your anxiety.

(13) Bipolar Disorder:

This causes mood changes that go way beyond the normal ups and downs of daily life. When you’re up, you might feel jumpy, talk really fast, and take big risks. When you’re down, you might be worried, have low energy, and feel worthless. And sometimes, you might feel a mix of both. These intense changes can mess with your sleep and energy, and make it hard to think clearly.

(14) Schizophrenia:

This serious mental illness can make you hear voices and see things that aren’t there. You might believe things that have no basis in reality. At first, you just might not be as social as normal. As it gets worse, it can be tough to keep your thoughts on track, making it hard to even talk to people. And you may act in ways that are way out of character, hard to predict, and out of control.

Source: WebMD

~Eowyn

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Auntie LuluRecynd77Dr. EowynAlmaMinarchian Recent comment authors
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GRIZZ
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GRIZZ

Damn.
I scored a 50 on this one

Zip-ped-e-doda
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Zip-ped-e-doda

Should you or your loved ones receive a prescription for any
psychiatric drug, Dr. Peter Breggin has written many books, testified in many court cases as well as hosting radio shows whereby the public can call in and ask questions.
https://breggin.com/

I encourage you to take the time to learn and benefit from this compassionate man’s knowledge and wisdom on the dangers of psychiatric drugs and his brilliant suggestions.

William
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William

I’ve been following Dr. Breggin for many years. About the time I was entering the Mental Health field I stumbled on his book Toxic Psychiatry. It completely changed the way I viewed “mental illness” and it’s treatment with medication. And that in turn caused me to be an outsider for my entire career. I eventually saw it as my job to protect my clients from the tender care of psychiatry and the idiot “professionals” in the field. Eventually they pushed me out and in retrospect they did me a huge favor. I can’t work in a field that has zero… Read more »

Minarchian
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Minarchian

You forgot one: Marriage

Alma
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Alma

So far so good on this side, didn’t see anything I could identify with me-only thing is the democRats, they make me sick to my stomach.

Auntie Lulu
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Auntie Lulu

Amen to that!!!!!

Recynd77
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Recynd77

This is a topic near to my heart. My husband suffers TBI from a brain infection, and he most likely has Parkinson’s, too (he definitely has dystonia, a related disorder).

Many, many meds can cause personality changes as well. Be careful with anything you put in your body!

William
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William

A note on BP disorder: In it’s true form it can be devastating, but it’s actually quite rare. I’ve only seen a few authentic cases over many years. The problem is that the APA grossly attenuated the sub-threshold diagnostic criteria to the point at which virtually anyone can be declared “bipolar”, because everyone has “mood swings”, ups and downs , good days and bad days. That’s not a psychiatric disorder, that’s just life. (people used to tell me they were bipolar and I’d say no, you just have a bad case of life). And then there was the invention of… Read more »

Auntie Lulu
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Auntie Lulu

Excellent article. Very good things to be aware of.