Tag Archives: Venezuela

Greens really are commies: 130 UN-backed green groups call for end of capitalism

Our suspicions are confirmed.

The green movement really is just the newest version of Marxist communism disguised as a concern for the environment.

At the end of a 4-day United Nations-backed conference, called the Social Pre-COP Preparatory Meeting, of 130 green activist groups in Venezuela, the groups issued a declaration that global warming climate change can only be “combated” by ending capitalism altogether.

Green commies celebrating Margarita DeclarationGreen commies celebrating the Margarita Declaration, July 18, 2014, Venezula.

The Margarita Declaration said: “The structural causes of climate change are linked to the current capitalist hegemonic system. To combat climate change it is necessary to change the system.”

That capitalism is the cause of “climate change” is also a position of the socialist Venezuelan government, the host of the meeting.

The declaration will be handed to environment government ministers when they meet ahead of the UN’s main round of climate talks in Lima this year.

The Social pre-COP meeting was the first time that NGOs (non-governmental organizations) were invited to participate with the UN at this scale at international climate talks. The government of Venezuela said the purpose of the meeting is to “set the basis of an alliance between peoples and governments”.

Ironically, although the Social pre-COP meeting was backed by the UN, the meeting’s end product of the Margarita Declaration opposes the views of the UN and many national governments on “combating” “climate change” via a capitalist “green economy” by encouraging green growth through carbon markets and clean energy investments.

Instead, the Margarita Declaration calls:

  • carbon markets a “false solution” to the problem of climate change. The UN has set up its own carbon market, called the Clean Development Mechanism, which allows developed countries to pay for projects that will reduce the carbon footprint of poor countries.
  • a UN-backed forest conservation scheme, Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Land Degradation (REDD), “dangerous and unethical”. Under REDD, rich countries pay developing nations to preserve their forests, removing some of the financial incentive to chop them down. Deforestation is a significant contributor to climate change as it releases the carbon that is stored in trees.

Objections to the “green economy” prompted a walkout at the Rio+20 summit in 2012 because some developing countries wanted rich countries to simply hand over cash and “sustainable” technologies to poorer nations. Venezuela, a staunchly socialist government, has long opposed the “green economy” concept, alongside other Latin American countries including Argentina, Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, and Nicaragua.

Sophie Yeo of rtcc.org reports that a participant at the July 15-18 Social pre-COP meeting who insisted on his anonymity said that while most of the Venezuelan groups present at the meeting were supportive of the Venezulan government’s position, there were 34 Venezuelan NGOs who rejected their invitation to the gathering, due to concerns that it would provide an opportunity for the government to push their socialist agenda.

Here are some choice quotes from Margarita Declaration on Climate Change, Social PreCOP Preparatory Meeting, July 15-18, 2014, Margarita Island, Venezuela:

Pg. 2: “Men and women have become consumerist monsters that consume all the resources given by the Earth”. Génesis Carmona, aged 11, elected representative of the Venezuelan Children Environment Movements.

Pg. 3: The world needs corrective actions before damages become irreversible. We denounce the lack of political will of the wealthiest countries.

Pg. 3: Colonialism continues to operate. Climate change occurs within a historic context where a group of countries based their development on practices generating the current environmental crisis, including Climate Change, while others suffer the worst consequences. The developed countries causing the Climate Change intend to side-track the discussion towards technological or market solutions, thus eluding their historic responsibilities.

P. 3: The struggles of the South must be supported in the countries of the North. The wealthiest countries must commit themselves to finding a solution to the Climate Change. Youth in the North must exert pressure on their governments in that sense. There is not much time left, the global North must take on its historic responsibility and youth must exert pressure for this to happen.

Pg. 4: The main sources for climate crisis are the political and economic systems commercializing and reifying nature and life, thus impoverishing spirituality and imposing consumerism and developmentalism that generate unequal regimes and exploitation of resources. This global crisis is exacerbated by unsustainable practices of exploitation and consumption by the developed countries and the elites of the developing countries…. For such purposes, it is required that the developed countries meet their moral and legal obligations, especially vis-à-vis vulnerable and marginalized countries and communities by lifting barriers such as intellectual property rights which prevent the attainment of the preservation of life over the planet and the salvation of human species. We likewise urge them to comply with the financial contribution and the transfer of safe and locally suitable technologies free from barriers such as intellectual property rights….

pg. 5: According to scientific evidence, in order not to exceed 1.5 degrees increase of temperature, it becomes necessary not to produce 80% of the fossil fuel reserves known. For this purpose, the developed countries require to immediately reduce consumption and production of fossil fuels….

Pg. 6: We reject any attempt to implement or promote dangerous and unethical solutions or responses to Climate Change, solutions whereby wealthy industrialized countries and corporations ultimately seek to use climate change as a means for profit. Some of such false responses, such as carbon production and markets have caused damages in our forests and soils, whereas the implementation of the “United Nations Program on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (UN-REDD)” and the production of agrofuels, have already caused seizure and fragmentation of lands.

Pg. 7: We demand the repair of historic debts, and reject the financing proposals which do not bring about effective transformations for a sustainable solution.

Pg. 9: It is necessary that the ancestral knowledge of the Peoples be deemed as equally important and valuable as scientific knowledge for decision-making and for actions against climate change by the UN and by the governments.

Pg. 10: The structural causes for climate change are linked to the current capitalist hegemonic system. Fighting the climate change involves changing the system.

Pg. 10: The change of the system must provide for a transformation of the economic, political, social and cultural systems at local, national, regional and global levels.

Pg. 11: We reject the implementation of false solutions to climate change, such as: carbon markets and other forms of privatization and commodification of life; geo-engineering, agrofuels productions, and measures favoring agribusiness and harming the production of food in an agro ecological manner, such as the use of transgenic seeds and agrotoxics, synthetic fertilizers and any other measure lessening the priority of the right to Good Living, health and the eradication of poverty enshrined in the Convention. We likewise reject the green economy, the intellectual property rights; the mega water dam projects, monocultures and nuclear energy.

Pg. 12: Ensure the financing by the developed countries to developing countries for such transformations, and for compensation and rehabilitation of the impacts of Climate Change. Financing must not be conditioned, and the management of the funds supplied shall be in the hands of the Peoples. The financing of mitigation and adaptation actions by the developed countries in the developing countries is a moral and legal obligation under the Convention by virtue of the historic responsibilities of the former. Funding must be reliable, predictable, sufficient and adequate. All obligations of the countries in the North in relation to finance, technology transfer and support for the compensation of losses and damages should be legally binding under the Climate Change Convention.

Click here to read the English version of the 13-page Margarita Declaration.

Among the 130 green activist groups that participated in the Social Pre-COP meeting are such well-known groups as:

  • Christian Aid
  • Climate Action Network
  • East Michigan Environmental Action Council (Grassroots Global Justice Alliance)
  • Friends of the Earth
  • Third World Network
  • World Wide Fund for Nature WWF International
  • Young Friends of the Earth

For the full list of groups, click here.

~Eowyn

Ain’t socialism grand?

toilet paper

Now Venezuela is running out of toilet paper

KATU: First milk, butter, coffee and cornmeal ran short. Now Venezuela is running out of the most basic of necessities – toilet paper.

Blaming political opponents for the shortfall, as it does for other shortages, the embattled socialist government says it will import 50 million rolls to boost supplies.

That was little comfort to consumers struggling to find toilet paper on Wednesday. “This is the last straw,” said Manuel Fagundes, a shopper hunting for tissue in downtown Caracas. “I’m 71 years old and this is the first time I’ve seen this.”

One supermarket visited by The Associated Press in the capital on Wednesday was out of toilet paper. Another had just received a fresh batch, and it quickly filled up with shoppers as the word spread. “I’ve been looking for it for two weeks,” said Cristina Ramos. “I was told that they had some here and now I’m in line.”

Economists say Venezuela’s shortages stem from price controls meant to make basic goods available to the poorest parts of society and the government’s controls on foreign currency.

State-controlled prices – prices that are set below market-clearing price – always result in shortages. The shortage problem will only get worse, as it did over the years in the Soviet Union,” said Steve Hanke, professor of economics at Johns Hopkins University.

President Nicolas Maduro, who was selected by the dying Hugo Chavez to carry on his “Bolivarian revolution,” claims that anti-government forces, including the private sector, are causing the shortages in an effort to destabilize the country.

The government this week announced it would import 760,000 tons of food and 50 million rolls of toilet paper.

Commerce Minister Alejandro Fleming blamed the shortage of toilet tissue on “excessive demand” built up as a result of “a media campaign that has been generated to disrupt the country.”

“The revolution will bring the country the equivalent of 50 million rolls of toilet paper,” he was quoted as saying Tuesday by state news agency AVN. “We are going to saturate the market so that our people calm down.”

Finance Minister Nelson Merentes said the government was also addressing the lack of foreign currency, which has resulted in the suspension of foreign supplies of raw materials, equipment and spare parts to Venezuelan companies, disrupting their production. “We are making progress … we have to work very hard,” Merentes told reporters Wednesday.

Many factories operate at half capacity because the currency controls make it hard for them to pay for imported parts and materials. Business leaders say some companies verge on bankruptcy because they cannot extend lines of credit with foreign suppliers.

Merentes said the government had met the U.S. dollar requests of some 1,500 small- and medium-sized companies facing supply problems, and was reviewing requests from a similar number of larger companies.

Chavez imposed currency controls a decade ago trying to stem capital flight as his government expropriated large land parcels and dozens of businesses.

Anointed by Chavez as his successor before the president died from cancer, Maduro won a close presidential election April 14 against opposition candidate Henrique Capriles, who refused to accept the result, claiming Maduro won through fraud and voter intimidation. He filed a complaint to the Supreme Court, asking for the vote to be annulled, though that’s highly unlikely to happen since the court is packed with government-friendly justices.

Patience is wearing thin among consumers who face shortages and long lines at supermarkets and pharmacies. Last month, Venezuela’s scarcity index reached its highest level since 2009, while the 12-month inflation rate has risen to nearly 30 percent. Shoppers often spend several days looking for basic items, and stock up when they find them.

Fleming, the commerce minister, said monthly consumption of toilet paper was normally 125 million rolls, but that current demand “leads us to think that 40 million more are required.”

“We will bring in 50 million to show those groups that they won’t make us bow down,” he said.

DCG

Rejoice! One of Satan’s spawn has gone home

Chavez

O Joyous Day.

Venezuela’s socialist dictator Hugo Chavez just croaked.

Only 58 years old, Sean Penn’s best bud died today in Caracas of complications from an unspecified cancer in his pelvic area.

Penn and Chavez, Dumb and Dumber

Penn and Chavez, Dumb and Dumber

Read more, here.

H/t James Habermehl

~Eowyn

Hugo Calls Obama a Clown

The best buds in happier times

BooHoo. There’s no honor among thieves grandiose narcissists.

Former Obama best bud, Hugo Chávez, is now calling him “a clown.”

Tom Phillips of The Guardian reports Dec. 20, 2011, that Chávez blasted Obama as a “clown” and an “embarrassment” who has turned the United States into a “disaster” after Obama criticized Venezuela’s ties with Iran and Cuba.

In a written interview Obama had with the Caracas paper El Universal, he questioned Venezuela’s connections to those countries. Incurring a narcissistic injury, Chávez hit back strongly at Obama on state TV Monday, saying Barry had given the interview only to “win votes” in the 2012 election.

That’s one clown calling another a clown. LOL

Hugo Chavez, Dec. 17, 2011.

He’s lost his hair from cancer treatments, but Hugo Chavez still manages to be fat despite his country, Venezuela, having a poverty rate of 66% in 1995.

So was the now-dead North Korea’s “Dear Leader” Kim Jong Il. So is Kim Jong Un, the 27-year-old youngest son of Dear Leader and the designated successor. Both are porky, although their countrymen are literally starving to death.

North Korea's new leader: Kim "Porky Pig" Jong Un

Did you know that President For Life of a socialist country Hugo Chavez — born in a 3-room mud hut into a working class family and later became a career military officer before he entered politics —  has a net worth estimated to be ONE BILLION U.S. DOLLARS?

~Eowyn

The Triple Threat

While sitting here tonight I started thinking about the repercussions of the recent events that have taken place in Libya. From a strategic viewpoint, having a radical Islamic regime backed by Iran in Libya presents a whole new threat to Europe and the U.S..

If Iranian missiles are shipped to Libya and if you combine that with the missile bases being constructed in Venezuela and on top of that the missiles in North Korea. Four unstable countries, three radical homicidal leaders, one of which is dying of cancer and all three with the desire to destroy the U.S. and it’s allies.

Of the three leaders, I consider Hugo Chavez the most dangerous at the moment. He knows he is dying, and a man in his position has nothing to lose and I’m sure he would like nothing more to leave a legacy of being the  first man to launch a nuclear missile on a U.S. city.

Kim Jong-il, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Hugo Chavez, three men who have formed an alliance that is hell bent on our destruction. I’m under no delusion that Obama will do anything to prevent an attack and probably would not take any significant retaliation if said attack took place. All we really need to understand is that while Obama is destroying our economy and is stoking class warfare across the country, our enemies are amassing strategically around and in our country and when we are weakened enough, have no doubt…THEY WILL STRIKE!

All we can do is pray and prepare, pray for the best and prepare for the worst. MAY GOD BLESS US ALL!

Tom in NC

After Egypt, 11 Dominoes May Fall

The overnight news from Egypt is that, despite President Hosni Mubarak’s concession to the rioters revolutionaries that he would step down, the unrest and violence are worsening. It appears pro-Mubarak people have been unleashed against the revolt and they are targeting western media. CNN’s Anderson Cooper was punched in the head yesterday and ABC’s Christiane Amanpour was surrounded by an angry mob who screamed “We hate Americans!”

The Egyptian unrest itself was inspired by what happened a week earlier in Tunisia where huge mobs, enraged by their political leaders’ corrupt lavish lifestyle, succeeded in overthrowing the regime.

Both Egypt and Tunisia share the same trigger factors of social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.), rising food prices, and high unemployment, especially among the college educated. In political science literature, the latter is a classic feature of Third World revolutions.

Wall Street Cheatsheet has identified 11 countries that have the same trigger factors as Egypt and may be the next dominoes to fall.

H/t beloved Fellowship co-founder Steve.

~Eowyn

 

violence escalates in Egypt

 

From “Your Cheat Sheet to the 11 Countries Which Could Follow Egypt’s Lead,” by Business Insider, Wall Street Cheatsheet, Feb 1, 2011:

1. MOROCCO:

  • Style of government: Constitutional Monarchy
  • Inflation: 2.6% year-over-year in December
  • Unemployment: Among graduates, 25%, Total rate at 9.1%
  • Social media: Very much a serious part of youth culture
  • Conclusion: Morocco’s government has already undergone democratic reforms, so any political pressure would likely be responded to in a similar manner, with more reforms. Those very reforms have been suggested by a government commission, so Morocco seems pretty safe at the moment, prepared to adjust if things get out of hand. 

2. JORDAN:

  • Style of government: Constitutional monarchy, incorporating limited democracy
  • Inflation: Jordanian inflation up 6.1% year-over-year in December, 1.2% month-over-month
  • Unemployment: Around 14%
  • Social media: 38-39% of Jordanians have internet access
  • Conclusion: Jordan is already experiencing protests related to these factors. The government is responding by providing food and fuel subsidies. King Abdullah just sacked his government and appointed a new one with reforms priority number one. Whether the government moves fast enough to implement these reforms will be the deciding factor in the future size of protests and threat to the regime.

3. SYRIA:

  • Style of government: Single party authoritarian, President Bashar al-Assad
  • Inflation: Government intends to take action to lower prices
  • Unemployment: 8.1% in 2009
  • Social media: Facebook still openly used by the public, searches for Egypt on computers, however, crash them.
  • Conclusion: The economic situation is not as dire in Syria as in other countries. The regime is, arguably, more ruthless than its Egyptian counterpart. The President believes his partnership with Iran and support for the Palestinian cause will keep him safe, and he’s already pushing for reforms. Syria’s state may be too powerful for the little protest movement developing to flourish.

4. SAUDI ARABIA:

  • Style of government: Absolute Monarchy
  • Inflation: Inflation at 5.4% in December, down from November
  • Unemployment: 10% in 2010
  • Social media: 3 million Saudi Arabians are on Facebook, with Twitter usage increasing quickly
  • Conclusion: Saudi Arabia has seen some small protests, but over the government response to flooding, not rising costs and unemployment. There are concerns on the streets that the country doesn’t have proper infrastructure and is recklessly spending its oil riches. The repressive regime is unlikely to fall under these smaller concerns, but its youth unemployment problem (42%) and religious minority (Shia) could eventually exert real pressure.

5. IRAN:

  • Style of government: Islamic Republic, with democratically elected representatives. Less than certain how “democratic” elections truly are. Ruled by Supreme Leader, who is a both religious and political leader.
  • Inflation: Inflation at 13.5% in early 2010, may be more than double that level
  • Unemployment: 14.6% as of August 
  • Social media: Significant penetration of both Twitter and Facebook. Government showed willingness to crackdown on use during previous protest movement.
  • Conclusion: Iran crushed its most recent protest movement. If inflation continues to rise, the sentiment may become more popular, and Egypt’s revolution could inspire Iranians back to the streets.

6. LIBYA:

  • Style of government: Authoritarian, led by Muammar al-Gaddafi
  • Inflation: CPI up 2.654% in 2009
  • Unemployment: Highest unemployment rate in North Africa
  • Social media: The Muslim Brotherhood has a Facebook page. Unknown levels of internet penetration.
  • Conclusion: Libya would seem a good bet. It’s stuck between revolutionary Tunisia and Egypt. Its leader is regarded as an international eccentric. He wants his son to take over, and the public’s not pleased. Financial squalor is probably worse than estimated. Whether or not social media could assist is unknown, but Libya is a likely future front in the spillover.

7. YEMEN:

  • Style of government: Presidential democracy, elections not entirely free
  • Inflation: No data of note, though likely higher that the 5.4% projection
  • Unemployment: 40%
  • Social media: 2.2 million internet users, population 23.4 million
  • Conclusion: Yemen has the deepest unemployment problem in the region, and likely a serious inflation problem too. There’s a large terrorist group in the country, as it is a headquarters for Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Protests are already significant. There is a sincere liklihood of change here, or, and this might be worse, further radicalisation of the population.

8. PAKISTAN:

  • Style of government: Democratic republic
  • Inflation: Over 15%
  • Unemployment: 14% in 2010 (estimate)
  • Social media: Heavy use, government has banned use over the depiction of Mohamed before.
  • Conclusion: Pakistan has a serious economic crisis, a weakness of state shown in recent flooding, confused positions over the U.S. and Taliban, as well as large anti-government, pro-Muslim fundamentalist forces. The potential for change is there. The biggest power source remains the military, however, and another coup, similar to the one that brought Musharaf to power, could occur.

9. VIETNAM:

  • Style of government: Authoritarian capitalism
  • Inflation: High inflation, including rising food costs
  • Unemployment: 6.5%
  • Social media: Blogs, Facebook, and other social media venues are prevalent
  • Conclusion: In Asia, Vietnam looks a likely candidate for protests, particularly if the economy slows down and unemployment increases. The economic trigger for a downturn would need to be pulled, however, before any change would take place.

10. VENEZUELA:

  • Style of government: Authoritarian republic
  • Inflation: 27.2% in 2010
  • Unemployment: 8.1% in the first 10 months of 2010
  • Social media: It exists, and Chavez has a Twitter account.
  • Conclusion: The economic numbers scream change, but there’s no way to know whether or not Chavez has outstayed his welcome. The country hasn’t had the same, long-term oppressive experience as a country like Egypt. And its leadership still appeals to the anti-American sentiment held by the populace.
  •  

11. CHINA:

  • Style of government: Authoritarian
  • Inflation: China has a serious inflation problem, with food prices at the forefront.
  • Unemployment: 4.2% [official figure; real unofficial unemployment is much higher. -Eowyn]
  • Social media: Significant penetration, but government aggressively censors
  • Conclusion: China has all the ingredients except the big one: unemployment. Now, there’s no guarantee rural China won’t see an uprising related to soaring prices and high unemployment there, but it’s unlikely to be passed on to the country’s cities. It would take a massive economic downturn, like one created by a liquidity crisis leading to a banking crisis leading to a recession, to trigger an unemployment surge that would threaten the regime.

Iran is Stationing Missiles in Venezuela

Cuban Missile Crisis redux.

This is ominous news: Iran (not America’s friend) is stockpiling missiles in Venezuela (not America’s friend) with a reach to the U.S. mainland.

I first saw a report on this 3 days ago but held off on posting this until I get additional confirmation.

Does America still hold to the Monroe Doctrine?

H/t beloved fellow Anon.

~Eowyn


An Iranian Shahab 3 missile. (UPI)

German Media: Iran Is Stockpiling Shahab 3 Missiles in Venezuela That Can Reach US

By Jim Hoft – Gateway Pundit – December 9, 2010

While Obama has been focusing his attention on the Republican hostage takers and bomb throwers the Iranian regime has been stockpiling Shahab 3 missiles in Venezuela that can reach the United States.
Hudson New York reported, via Israel Matsav:

According to Die Welt, Venezuela has agreed to allow Iran to establish a military base manned by Iranian missile officers, soldiers of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard and Venezuelan missile officers. In addition, Iran has given permission for the missiles to be used in case of an “emergency”. In return, the agreement states that Venezuela can use these facilities for “national needs” – radically increasing the threat to neighbors like Colombia. The German daily claims that according to the agreement, Iranian Shahab 3 (range 1300-1500 km), Scud-B (285-330 km) and Scud-C (300, 500 and 700 km) will be deployed in the proposed base. It says that Iran also pledged to help Venezuela in rocket technology expertise, including intensive training of officers

Venezuela has also become the country through which Iran intends to bypass UN sanctions. Following a new round of UN sanctions against the Islamic Republic, for example, Russia decided not to sell five battalions of S-300PMU-1 air defence systems to Iran. These weapons, along with a number of other weapons, were part of a deal, signed in 2007, worth $800 million. Now that these weapons cannot be delivered to Iran, Russia is looking for new customers; according to the Russian press agency Novosti[2], it found one: Venezuela.