Tag Archives: Thomas Edison

Be your own expert. That way, if you’re wrong, you’re wrong :D

 

“… after a few more flashes in the pan, we shall hear very little more of Edison or his electric lamp. Every claim he makes has been tested and proved impracticable.” [New York Times, January 16, 1880]

“Professor Goddard … does not know the relation of action to reaction … he only seems to lack the knowledge ladled out daily in our high schools” [New York Times, January 13, 1920]

“Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible.” [Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895]

“Airplanes are interesting toys but of no military value.” [Marechal Ferdinand Foch, Professor of Strategy, Ecole Superieure de Guerre]

“I think there is a world market for maybe five computers.” [Thomas Watson, chairman IBM, 1943]

“There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.” [Ken Olson, Chairman and founder Digital Equipment Corp., 1977]

“640K ought to be enough for anybody.” [Bill Gates, 1981]

“Fooling around with alternating current is just a waste of time. Nobody will use it, ever.” [Thomas Edison, 1889]

“There is not the slightest indication that nuclear energy will ever be obtainable. It would mean that the atom would have to be shattered at will.” [Albert Einstein, 1932]

The energy produced by the atom is a very poor kind of thing. Anyone who expects a source of power from the transformation of these atoms is talking moonshine” [Ernst Rutherford, 1933]

“We don’t like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out.” [Decca Recording Co. turning down the Beatles, 1962]

“I would sooner believe that two Yankee professors lied, than that stones fell from the sky” [Thomas Jefferson, on hearing the report of a meteorite fall]

Louis Pasteur‘s theory of germs is ridiculous fiction.” [Pierre Pachet, Professor of Physiology at Toulouse, 1872]

“[W]hen the Paris Exhibition closes electric light will close with it and no more be heard of.” – Erasmus Wilson (1878) Professor at Oxford University

“This `telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a practical form of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.” – Western Union internal memo, 1878

Radio has no future.” – Lord Kelvin (1824-1907), British mathematician and physicist, ca. 1897.

“Rail travel at high speed is not possible because passengers, unable to breathe, would die of asphyxia.” – Dr. Dionysus Lardner (1793-1859), Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy at University College, London.

~Steve~                 H/T  May