Tag Archives: starvation

Killing Us Softly – Part 2

USELESS EATERS 

KILLING US SOFTLY Part 2

by Kelleigh Nelson

“A total world population of 250-300 million people, a 95% decline from present levels, would be ideal.”  Audubon magazine, interview with Ted Turner, 1996

“”This is a terrible thing to say. In order to stabilize world population, we must eliminate 350,000 people per day. It is a horrible thing to say, but it’s just as bad not to say it.”” Jacques Cousteau in an interview with the UNESCO Courier for November 1991

In 1982, I lived in Ellettsville, Indiana, a suburb of Bloomington. At that time I was working as a receptionist for a dermatologist. Across the street from the doctor’s office was the hospital where “Baby Doe” was born with Down’s syndrome. The baby also had an obstruction in the esophagus that prevented normal eating. The tracheo-esophageal fistula was easily treated, but both the parents and the physician agreed to allow the baby to die of starvation. The courts granted the parents and physician the “blessing” of doing this to the infant. Public outrage ensued. Health and Human Services under President Reagan drew up guidelines against federally-funded health care facilities allowing handicapped infants to die. Other organizations fought this ruling and the courts struck it down as the government being too invasive into the medical profession. Oh, but they should see the invasiveness today with ObamaCare! Continue reading

The End of Japan as We Knew It

Heroic rescue workers march into damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant

The End of Japan as We Knew It

by Joseph E Fasciani, a regular commenter on Fellowship of the Minds

We must understand what’s about to happen in Japan. I’ve searched the Internet, and as best I can tell, no one has brought this ultimate reality to light.

And no, it’s not the looming nuclear explosions that I’m writing about, not at all. Let’s set aside the radiation issue per se, as a planetary fear-monger. We need to focus on what this event means to the people of Nippon, and, by extension, to the rest of the herd here on planet Earth.

Folks, look at a map: Japan’s the size of California, but with a population of 127,360,000, nearly half that of the USA, and four times that of Canada, my home. Its rugged landscape means that agricultural opportunities are limited. Japan exports very little food; it must import a great deal of what it wants or needs. Which it could do and did, until now.

The problem is that the recent nuclear disaster occurred in what is Japan’s single largest agricultural area, now likely contaminated with radiation, perhaps for lifetimes to come. It’s difficult for this writer to see how Japan can increase its remaining productivity to replace such a large loss. In my original May 23, 2004 article at Axis of Logic, “It’s Time to Again Ask: Who Will Feed China?,” I wrote that:

“To feed its 1.3 billion people, China may soon have to import so much grain that this could trigger unprecedented rises in grain prices. When Japan, a nation of just 125 million, began to import food, world grain markets rejoiced. But China’s market s ten times greater, so there may not be enough easily available grain in the world to meet that market. And here’s where it gets really sticky.”

Today, seven years later, it’s a far stickier problem, as we will now have to feed both China and Japan. And just how will this happen? Shall “free markets” dictate that only the highest bidders will eat and live? How about lotteries, each draw good for ten million bushels of wheat or rice? Just how, and by whom, will these crucial, life-saving decisions be made?

Look at it this way: Do you trust your political leaders to make the right decision if it were you and your family who were to be fed? Would you accept your luck of the draw in the lottery of food for life? If you didn’t get a winning ticket, what do you do next? Is this when Johnny gets his gun? Ask yourself honestly, then tell me.

The world awaits your answer.

This Is North Korea

A public execution:

A country that’s a huge prison camp: the barbed wire is not to keep outsiders away, but to keep the North Korean people from leaving:

The real North Korea that Dear Leader Kim Jong Il doesn’t want the world to see:

~Eowyn