Tag Archives: science

Watch Instant Vapor Forms in Siberia. Really KULE!!!

Now This is KULE!!!!!!

It’s a popular experiment in very cold places. “Winter fun in Siberia!” Dmitry Klimensky, a Russian in Siberia, declared on Twitter, with a link to a video of him throwing a boiling pot of water into the freezing air.
The video went viral, spreading across the globe.

~Steve~

Archeologists find evidence of the obliteration of Sodom-Gomorrah

Since God created the world, and since science is all about studying the natural world, there is no intrinsic reason why science and religion, specifically Christianity, should be at loggerheads. Indeed, as science becomes more advanced, more and more it is confirming biblical accounts.

Several months ago, geologists found confirmation that, just as Matthew 27:50-52 recounted (“But Jesus cried out again in a loud voice, and gave up his spirit. And behold, the veil of the sanctuary was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth quaked, rocks were split, tombs were opened….”), an earthquake did take place at or around the time of Jesus’ death on the cross. The geologists gave a precise date for His death: Friday, April 3, 33 A.D.

Now, a team of archeologists have discovered evidence of a catastrophic “heat event” that wiped out ancient Sodom and Gomorrah — just as the Old Testament had chronicled:

Genesis 19

17 And it came to pass, when they had brought them forth abroad, that he said, Escape for thy life; look not behind thee, neither stay thou in all the plain; escape to the mountain, lest thou be consumed.

24 Then the Lord rained upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the Lord out of heaven;

25 And he overthrew those cities, and all the plain, and all the inhabitants of the cities, and that which grew upon the ground.

The Destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, by John Martin, 1852

John Bergsma writes for The Sacred Page, Dec. 7, 2011:

By far the most interesting session at the recent Society of Biblical Literature Congress in San Francisco was one I wandered into by chance.  I am always curious about what is going on in biblical archeology, so one afternoon I decided to … go hear about the excavations at a certain site called “Tall-el-Hammam.”

I had no idea what I was in for. 

After about five minutes into the session, I realized that the archeological team assigned to this dig was convinced that they had found the biblical Sodom and Gomorrah. After another half-hour, it seemed they had most of the participants convinced as well. The sites fit the geographical and temporal context into which Sodom and Gomorrah are placed in the biblical texts. The cities at the site were suddenly and completely wiped out in the Late Bronze Age, which makes a reasonably good fit with the biblical accounts of Abraham and Lot. 

The entire presentation was very convincing, but never once did they deal with the “elephant in the room”: what caused the sites to be suddenly abandoned?  As soon as the session was over, I was the first to raise my hand.  “Did you find any arrow heads?  Signs of invasion?  What happened to them?” 

The lead archeologist paused for a moment.  “I didn’t want to go there,” he said.  Another pause. “I’m preparing material for publication.”  Pause.  “All I want to say ‘on camera’ is, they appear to have been wiped out in a ‘heat event’.”

A “heat event”!?  What?!

“If you want to know more, I’ll talk after the session off the record.”

I wish I could divulge what he said to a small group of us clustered around the podium after the session was over, but it would break confidence. We’ll have to wait for the official peer-reviewed publications.

Here’s a link to the dig’s main website: http://www.tallelhammam.com/

One of the archeologists, Dr. Steven Collins, was more forthcoming in a comment he wrote on Bergsma’s article. This is what Dr. Collins wrote:

“On our terminal MB2 event, what I can say is that multiple lines of evidence continue to confirm that not only massive Tall el-Hammam, but also its many satellite towns and villages on the eastern Kikkar, suffered some sort of fiery, civilization-ending cataclysm toward the end of the Middle Bronze Age, with the selfsame, well-watered-in-abundance area remaining devoid of settlements for the next 600 years or so [...] The entirety of Tall el-Hammam’s MB2 footprint is covered in heavy ash (from .5m-1m thick), ash filled destruction debris, and other conflagratory indicators that will be published in appropriate venues. [...] Is Tall el-Hammam biblical Sodom? Well, if it isn’t (and I say this with complete confidence in what I know to be the facts of the case), there are going to be a lot of people with a lot of ‘splainin’ to do, Lucy!”

In a comment responding to Dr. Collins, Bergsma asks a follow up question: “Is there any associated destruction layer at Jericho from this same time period?”

Dr. Collins’ answer:

“Yes, John, there is. The terminal MB destruction at Jericho seems to be of similar date (17th/16th century BCE). Still needs a lot of study. Our ceramic assemblage is very similar, perhaps identical. It seems reasonable that Hammam and Jericho, along with the rest of the towns in the Kikkar, went down together. Jericho was re-occupied by around 1400 for a brief period. The eastern Kikkar didn’t recover at all until about 1000 BCE when a few Iron 2 walled towns sprang up.”

A cataclysmic “civilization-ending” “conflagratory” (fiery) “heat event” that reduced Sodom and Gomorrah to ashes, making the area uninhabitable for 600 years. That’s no ordinary fire. Not even a volcanic eruption would do that.

As an example, the ecology of Mount St. Helens in Washington state quickly recovered after the devastating eruptions of May 18, 1980. One account chronicles:

“within weeks, an exotic mammal started meandering through the devastation…. A few burrowing animals survived in zones of complete devastation. Volcanic ash is sterile and lifeless, but in parts of the blast area … [Virginia Dale, an ecologist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, says,] ‘Pocket gophers came up through the ash, and because of their habits, succeeded in mixing the soil with the ash layer, and with seeds and parts of plants.’ In areas with less than, say, 25 centimeters of ash, gophers ‘were really important to the recovery.’ Credit the gophers for mixing essential fungi that help plant roots to absorb soil nutrients. … Overall, Dale says, the recovery has been ‘highly variable but rapid in some disturbance types,’ and quite different from what ecologists would have predicted.”

The archeological evidence of what happened to Sodom and Gomorrah is sobering….

~Eowyn

Extreme Weather Is Another Global Warming Lie

A year ago, someone hacked into and leaked the e-mails of the University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (CRU), thereby exposing to the world the underhanded and downright anti-science acts of the Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW) cabal. The cabal had suppressed data contrary to AGW and blackballed skeptical scientists by preventing their work from being published in peer-reviewed journals.

After Climategate broke into the news, CRU Director Dr. Phil Jones made the following startling admissions

  • He had “misplaced” much of the raw data on which he based his AGW claims, although the data are absolutely essential for other scientists to verify and replicate his claims.
  • There’s been no global warming since 1995.
  • There really was a Medieval Warm Period, which Jones had denied and conveniently left out of his famous “hockey stick” graph on which he rests his AGW claims.

Despite those admissions, Jones and other Warmists such as Al Gore still insist that AGW ManBearPig is real! The only difference is that they now call ManBearPig by another name: It’s not Global Warming, it’s Climate Change!!!

And to get around the inconvenient truths that not only has there been no global warming since 1995, but the globe had a Medieval Warm Period before industrialization brought those warming-causing CO2 emissions, the Warmists now switch to weather extremes as evidence of climate change/global warming. Summers are getting hotter! Winters are getting colder and snowier! There’ll be more storms, hurricanes, cyclones, and tornados!

Alas, as the following article shows, like its predecessor Global Warming, the purported phenomenon of Extreme Weather is also not true. Global atmospheric data from 1871 to the present show no evidence that our weather is getting more extreme. Given the testimony of the empirical data, the claim of extreme weather is yet another lie of the Global Warming cabal.

~Eowyn

The Weather Isn’t Getting Weirder

The latest research belies the idea that storms are getting more extreme.

By Anne Jolis – Wall St. Journal – Feb 10, 2011

Last week a severe storm froze Dallas under a sheet of ice, just in time to disrupt the plans of the tens of thousands of (American) football fans descending on the city for the Super Bowl. On the other side of the globe, Cyclone Yasi slammed northeastern Australia, destroying homes and crops and displacing hundreds of thousands of people.

Some climate alarmists would have us believe that these storms are yet another baleful consequence of man-made CO2 emissions. In addition to the latest weather events, they also point to recent cyclones in Burma, last winter’s fatal chills in Nepal and Bangladesh, December’s blizzards in Britain, and every other drought, typhoon and unseasonable heat wave around the world.

But is it true? To answer that question, you need to understand whether recent weather trends are extreme by historical standards. The Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project is the latest attempt to find out, using super-computers to generate a dataset of global atmospheric circulation from 1871 to the present.

As it happens, the project’s initial findings, published last month, show no evidence of an intensifying weather trend. “In the climate models, the extremes get more extreme as we move into a doubled CO2 world in 100 years,” atmospheric scientist Gilbert Compo, one of the researchers on the project, tells me from his office at the University of Colorado, Boulder. “So we were surprised that none of the three major indices of climate variability that we used show a trend of increased circulation going back to 1871.”

In other words, researchers have yet to find evidence of more-extreme weather patterns over the period, contrary to what the models predict. “There’s no data-driven answer yet to the question of how human activity has affected extreme weather,” adds Roger Pielke Jr., another University of Colorado climate researcher.

We do know that carbon dioxide and other gases trap and re-radiate heat. We also know that humans have emitted ever-more of these gases since the Industrial Revolution. What we don’t know is exactly how sensitive the climate is to increases in these gases versus other possible factors—solar variability, oceanic currents, Pacific heating and cooling cycles, planets’ gravitational and magnetic oscillations, and so on.

Given the unknowns, it’s possible that even if we spend trillions of dollars, and forgo trillions more in future economic growth, to cut carbon emissions to pre-industrial levels, the climate will continue to change—as it always has.

That’s not to say we’re helpless. There is at least one climate lesson that we can draw from the recent weather: Whatever happens, prosperity and preparedness help. North Texas’s ice storm wreaked havoc and left hundreds of football fans stranded, cold, and angry. But thanks to modern infrastructure, 21st century health care, and stockpiles of magnesium chloride and snow plows, the storm caused no reported deaths and Dallas managed to host the big game on Sunday.

Compare that outcome to the 55 people who reportedly died of pneumonia, respiratory problems and other cold-related illnesses in Bangladesh and Nepal when temperatures dropped to just above freezing last winter. Even rich countries can be caught off guard: Witness the thousands stranded when Heathrow skimped on de-icing supplies and let five inches of snow ground flights for two days before Christmas. Britain’s GDP shrank by 0.5% in the fourth quarter of 2010, for which the Office of National Statistics mostly blames “the bad weather.”

Arguably, global warming was a factor in that case. Or at least the idea of global warming was. The London-based Global Warming Policy Foundation charges that British authorities are so committed to the notion that Britain’s future will be warmer that they have failed to plan for winter storms that have hit the country three years running.

A sliver of the billions that British taxpayers spend on trying to control their climes could have bought them more of the supplies that helped Dallas recover more quickly. And, with a fraction of that sliver of prosperity, more Bangladeshis and Nepalis could have acquired the antibiotics and respirators to survive their cold spell.

A comparison of cyclones Yasi and Nargis tells a similar story: As devastating as Yasi has been, Australia’s infrastructure, medicine, and emergency protocols meant the Category 5 storm has killed only one person so far. Australians are now mulling all the ways they could have better protected their property and economy.

But if they feel like counting their blessings, they need only look to the similar cyclone that hit the Irrawaddy Delta in 2008. Burma’s military regime hadn’t allowed for much of an economy before the cyclone, but Nargis destroyed nearly all the Delta had. Afterwards, the junta blocked foreign aid workers from delivering needed water purification and medical supplies. In the end, the government let Nargis kill more than 130,000 people.

Global-warming alarmists insist that economic activity is the problem, when the available evidence show it to be part of the solution. We may not be able to do anything about the weather, extreme or otherwise. But we can make sure we have the resources to deal with it when it comes.