Tag Archives: sacrifice

We Will Never Forget You

In honor of all the brave men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for us…

And their families…

Design by BKeyser, an ex Marine.

Freedom Is Not Free

Author Unknown

I watched the flag pass by one day.
It fluttered in the breeze.
A young Marine saluted it,
And then he stood at ease.
I looked at him in uniform
So young, so tall, so proud,
He’d stand out in a crowd.

I thought how many men like him
had fallen through the years.
How many had died on foreign soil?
How many mothers’ tears?
How many pilots’ planes shot down?Patriotic - Flag at sunset
How many died at sea?
How many foxholes were soldiers’ graves?
No, freedom is not free.

I heard the sound of Taps one night,
when everything was still
I listened to the bugler play
And felt a sudden chill.
I wondered just how many times
That Taps had meant “Amen”
When a flag had draped a coffin
Of brother or a friend.
I thought of all the children,
Of mothers and the wives,Patriotic - Fallen but not forgotten
Of fathers, sons and husbands
with interrupted lives.

I thought about a graveyard
At the bottom of the sea
Of unmarked graves in Arlington…
No, freedom is not free.

The meaning of the U.S. Flag ceremony

The first fold of our flag is a symbol of life.

The second fold is a symbol of our belief the eternal life.

The third fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veteran departing our ranks who gave a portion of life for the defense of our country to attain a peace throughout the world.

The fourth fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in time of war for His divine guidance.

The fifth fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our Country, in dealing with other countries may she always be right; but it is still our country, right or wrong.”

The sixth fold is for where our hearts lie. It is with our heart that we pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States Of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, Indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

The seventh fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

The eighth fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day, and to honor mother, for whom it flies on Mother’s Day.

The ninth fold is a tribute to womanhood; for it has been through their faith, love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great have been molded.

The tenth fold is a tribute to the father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for the defense of our country since they were first born.

The eleventh fold, in the eyes of a Hebrew citizen represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon, and glorifies in their eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

The twelfth fold, in the eyes of a Christian citizen, represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in their eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost.

When the flag is completely folded, thirteenth fold, the stars are uppermost reminding us of our national motto, “In God We Trust”.

After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, ever reminding us of the Soldiers who served under General George Washington and the Sailors and Marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for us the rights, privileges, and freedoms we enjoy today.

The next time you see a flag ceremony honoring someone who has served our country, either in the Armed Forces or in our civilian services such as the Police force or Fire Department, keep in mind all the important reasons behind each and every movement. For the flag ceremony is America’s tribute to those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice for all of us.

H/t beloved Wendy, a vet.

~Eowyn

We Can’t All Be Heroes

The Honor Flight Network (HFN) is a non-profit organization created solely to honor America’s veterans for all their sacrifices. HFN provides free round-trip flights for our aging veterans to Washington, D.C. to visit their memorials. (Read about how HFN began in 2005, here.)

Terminally ill veterans and World War II veterans are TOP PRIORITY. Of all of the wars in recent memory, it was World War II that truly threatened our very existence as a nation—and as a culturally diverse, free society. Now, with over one thousand World War II veterans dying each day, our time to express our thanks to these brave men and women is running out.

Now, other groups are stepping up, including Wisconsin’s Stars and Stripes Honor Flight. The group is trying to get 50,000 viewer hits on this documentary trailer by Memorial Day. Please help them to achieve that goal.

Honor Flight Network can do this only because of our donations. Please go HERE to donate.

If you’re a veteran and would like to visit your war memorial in Washington, DC, here’s the application form on HFN.

“We can’t all be heroes. Some of us have to stand on the curb and clap as they go by.” -Will Rogers

H/t PatriotActionNetwork

~Eowyn

You Took My Place!

YOU TOOK MY PARKING SPACE AT CHURCH

One day, a man went to visit a church. 

He got there early, parked his car and got out. Another car pulled up near the driver got out and said, “I always park there! You took my place!”

The visitor went inside for Sunday School, found an empty seat and sat down. A young lady from the church approached him and stated, “That’s my seat! You took my place!” The visitor was somewhat distressed by this rude welcome, but said nothing.

After Sunday School, the visitor went into the sanctuary and sat down. Another member walked up to him and said, ” That’s where I always sit! You took my place!” The visitor was even more troubled by this treatment, but still he said nothing.

Later as the congregation was praying for Christ to dwell among them, the visitor stood up, and his appearance began to change….

Horrible scars became visible on his hands and on his sandaled feet.

Someone from the congregation noticed him and called out, “What happened to you?”

The visitor replied, as his hat became a crown of thorns, and a tear fell from his eye, “I took your place.”

A big h/t to beloved fellow Doc’s Wife.

~Eowyn

True Love

True Love

For God so loVed the world

       That He gAve

              His onLy

              BegottEn

                     SoN

                          That whosoever

        Believeth In Him

            Should Not perish

         But have Everlasting life.”

                                   ~John 3:16

H/t beloved fellow PatriotAngel

Who was Saint Valentine?

At least three different Saint Valentines, all of them martyrs, are mentioned in the early martyrologies under date of 14 February. One is described as a priest at Rome, another as bishop of Interamna (modern Terni), and these two seem both to have suffered in the second half of the third century and to have been buried on the Flaminian Way, but at different distances from the city. In William of Malmesbury’s time what was known to the ancients as the Flaminian Gate of Rome and is now the Porta del Popolo, was called the Gate of St. Valentine. The name seems to have been taken from a small church dedicated to the saint which was in the immediate neighborhood. Of both these St. Valentines some sort of Acta are preserved but they are of relatively late date and of no historical value. Of the third Saint Valentine, who suffered in Africa with a number of companions, nothing further is known.

Saint Valentine’s Day

The popular customs associated with Saint Valentine’s Day undoubtedly had their origin in a conventional belief generally received in England and France during the Middle Ages, that on 14 February, i.e. half way through the second month of the year, the birds began to pair. Thus in Chaucer’s Parliament of Foules we read:

For this was sent on Seynt Valentyne’s day
Whan every foul cometh ther to choose his mate.

For this reason the day was looked upon as specially consecrated to lovers and as a proper occasion for writing love letters and sending lovers’ tokens.

[Source: Catholic Encyclopedia]

~Eowyn