Tag Archives: political correctness

Comedian Jackie Mason Sounds Off on Political Correctness

Mason: Telling it like it is...

Mason: Telling it like it is…

THR: Legendary 84-year-old comedian Jackie Mason is weighing in on a controversy about political correctness that much-younger comedian Jerry Seinfeld ignited a couple of weeks earlier when he said he won’t play colleges because “they’re so PC.”

Fittingly, Mason’s commentary strays far from politically correct norms, especially regarding race and sexual preferences.

“If I’m a busboy in Philadelphia, then I have to be careful about what I say. But if I’m a public tycoon like Jerry Seinfeld, and I got a billion dollars in my pocket, he’s got to be nuts to wonder or worry about what people are going to think,” Mason says in a taped interview with radio host Aaron Klein that will air on Sunday.

Before, you couldn’t pick on homosexuals because it was bad taste, because homosexuals were a persecuted minority. Now, it’s exactly the opposite,” says Mason in audio obtained by The Hollywood Reporter. “Homosexuals can attack you and abuse you. And people who are in favor of same-sex marriage could abuse you, but you can’t say a word against same-sex marriage.

He says that gay couples are a “sensation” while heterosexual couples are suspect, and heads of companies who oppose same-sex marriage “are out of business.”

Joking about skin color is also problematic nowadays, Mason says.

“It used to be you couldn’t say the N-word,” he says. “Then the word ‘black’ went out of business because you had to say ‘Negro.’ Then ‘Negro’ went out of business, you had to say ‘African American.’ Now, everyday, you have to buy a paper to find out what a black person is called today … A black person can call you anything he wants. Free speech today is only for black people.”

Later, he amends his assessment: “There is only free speech now in this country for black people and homosexuals and any other minority … But if you are a white Protestant American gentile, you can’t say a word.”

Seinfeld set off a debate in Hollywood — in particular among comedians — when he said during an ESPN interview that college kids were too quick to brand comedians “sexists” and “racists” if they were to tell jokes perceived as insensitive. Colleagues like Dave Chappelle and Bill Maher have agreed with Seinfeld while others, notably Whoopi Goldberg, have been less supportive.

DCG

You can’t celebrate America, school says. UPDATE: Principal responds to FOTM

The Principal has responded to an email from FOTM:

Thank you for your email. We regret that you feel our recent decision regarding My Country Monday was not patriotic. This could not be further from the truth. The original intent of Spirit Week at Fort Collins High School was to unify the student body.

When students first proposed Merica Monday, we felt that it was against this unifying theme and disrespectful to our country. Merica is a slang term that is often used in a negative stereotypical way to describe life in the United States.  This is what led us to discuss alternatives with students.

We were surprised that our community interpreted our actions as anti-American. We are a proud public school in America and support many activities to celebrate our great nation. Due to this outpouring of sentiment and misinterpretation of our intentions, we have decided to rename the first day of our Spirit Week America Day as opposed to Merica Day.

We look forward to enjoying the creativity and energy of our students as they celebrate their patriotism next week.

Sincerely,

Mark Eversole
Principal

Excellent news!

Todd Starnes: Fox News: Students and parents at a Colorado high school are outraged after administrators turned down their request for a spirit week day honoring America because it might offend non-Americans.

“They said they didn’t want to offend anyone from other countries or immigrants,” a 16-year-old member of the student council told me. “They just really did not want to make anyone feel uncomfortable.”

The student council at Fort Collins High School had proposed having a day to celebrate the United States during next week’s Winter Spirit Week. The young people pitched “’Merica Monday” – and invited their classmates to dress in patriotic colors. Their proposal was promptly shot down by administrators.

They said they didn’t want to be exclusive to any other country,” a 17-year-old member of the student council told me.

The students and parents who talked to me about this incident have asked to remain anonymous. The parents feared their children might face reprisals from liberal educators.

“It’s bizarre and idiotic that we’ve come to this crossroads in our society that we are having to sacrifice our own culture and belief system,” one of the parents told me. “I can’t even tell you how it got our blood boiling.”

After the administrators rejected the day to celebrate America, the teenagers offered a compromise – “My Country Monday.”

“We opened it up to everyone – no matter what country you are from,” the 17-year-old student told me. “That got declined, too.”

The school’s decision left students frustrated, confused and angry.

“It’s shocking,” the 16-year-old said. “There are men and women fighting for our country and we should be able to celebrate that and be proud that we live in a country where we are allowed to vote – the right to free speech. They won’t even let us celebrate it.”

The irony, said the students, is that they are required to participate in Cinco de Mayo celebrations. One member of the student council pointed out the hypocrisy – and noted that students were not being forced to dress in red, white and blue for “’Merica Day.”

“We were confused why we couldn’t do one day that was for America,” the student told me. The parents said they are “so tired” of political correctness.

The principal at Fort Collins High School did not return my phone calls and neither did the assistant principal. A spokesperson for the Poudre School District sent me a statement acknowledging they rejected the “’Merica Day” celebration.

“Building administration met with the students to discuss the inconsistency of this day versus the other planned theme days including PJ day and Twin day,” the statement read. “The students then suggested changing the first day to My Country Monday and administration agreed. This theme day allows students to showcase their pride in America and for international students, their country of origin.

However, parents and students said that’s not accurate. They said My Country Monday was originally rejected last week and was only reinstated midday Monday – shortly after I called the school district and began making inquiries (a coincidence, I’m sure.)

I asked the district spokesperson to clarify their statement. The spokesperson did not return my message.

“They said they didn’t feel comfortable having a day celebrated where students might feel uncomfortable with the patriotism that students are showing,” one of the students told me.

Unbelievable. This is the United States of America. We welcome the huddled masses yearning to be free with arms wide open. But if you come to our land and take offense at our values and traditions, then don’t let the door hit you on the way out.

And shame on the administrators at Fort Collins High School for treating American school children like second-class citizens.

To the young patriots at Fort Collins High School, I offer these words: America, America, God shed His grace on Thee. Don’t let your teachers tell you otherwise.

DCG

VA hospitals ban cards that say “Merry Christmas”

Todd Starnes reports for FoxNews, Dec. 25, 2013, that fourth-grader Gracie Brown was among the boys and girls at Grace Academy in Prosper, Tex., who had spent most of last Friday making homemade Christmas cards for bedridden veterans at the VA hospital in Dallas.

Little Gracie drew an American flag on her card, together with the words “Merry Christmas. Thank you for your service.”

VA banned this Merry Christmas card

Gracie was proud of her card. She told MyFoxDFW.com that she had hoped it would make the day of a sick veteran at the hospital “because their family might live far away, and they might not have somebody to celebrate Christmas with. I’d like them to know they’ve not been forgotten and somebody wanted to say thank you.”

But the bedridden veterans at the VA hospital will never get to see Gracie’s card. Nor will they see the cards made by 51 other students. That’s because the Christmas cards violate VA policy.

On Monday morning the boys and girls were planning on hand delivering the cards to the wounded veterans. Susan Chapman, a math teacher at the academy who’s married to a veteran and volunteers with the American Legion and other veterans’ organizations, called the hospital to make final arrangements and that’s when she learned there was a problem.

Chapman said, “I told him [an official at the VA hospital] my students made cards, we’d like to bring them down for the veterans. And he said, ‘That’s great. We’re thrilled to have them, except the only thing is, we can’t accept anything that says ‘Merry Christmas’ or ‘God bless you’ or any scriptural references because of all the red tape.'”

A VA official quoted the policy which is in the Veterans Health Administration handbook:

“In order to be respectful of our veterans’ religious beliefs, all donated holiday cards are reviewed by a multi-disciplinary team of staff led by chaplaincy services and determined if they are appropriate (non-religious) to freely distribute to patients. We regret this process was not fully explained to this group and apologize for any misunderstanding.”

Andrea Brown, Gracie’s mom, was dumbfounded by the news. She told MyFoxDFW.com, “This wasn’t the country I grew up in, when you couldn’t say ‘Merry Christmas,’ you couldn’t say ‘God bless you’ or reference any scripture.” She said the boys and girls were heartbroken that the military personnel would not be able to receive their cards: “They couldn’t believe that these people they wanted to honor weren’t going to get the chance to see what they had done.”

Hiram Sasser, director of litigation for Liberty Institute, said it was a new low “even for the Scrooges and Grinches at the VA. Does the VA have no shame? Targeting the benevolent work of little children for censorship is disgusting. Do the Grinches in the administration of the VA really believe our bravest warriors need protection from the heartfelt well wishes of small children saying Merry Christmas?”

See also:

H/t Don Hank

~Eowyn

Leftwing Lunacy: White paper is racist!

In many ways, the Brits are way worse than America in their socialism and politically-correct multicultural tyranny.

According to Anne O’Connor, an “early years education consultant” who advises local schools in the UK on “equality and diversity,” children should be provided paper in all colors to draw on, instead of the standard white paper because white paper is racist.

And witches in fiction and movies should not be depicted in black hats because that’s racist also.

Anne O'Connor Anne O’Connor looks like a witch even without a raaacist black hat

From The Telegraph:

From the Wicked Witch of the West in the Wizard of Oz to Meg, the good witch from the Meg and Mog children’s books, witches have always dressed in black.

But their traditional attire has now come in for criticism from equality experts who claim it could send a negative message to toddlers in nursery and lead to racism.

Instead, teachers should censor the toy box and replace the pointy black hat with a pink one, while dressing fairies, generally resplendent in pale pastels, in darker shades.

Another staple of the classroom – white paper – has also been questioned by Anne O’Connor, an early years consultant who advises local authorities on equality and diversity.

Children should be provided with paper other than white to drawn on and paints and crayons should come in “the full range of flesh tones”, reflecting the diversity of the human race, according to the former teacher.

Finally, staff should be prepared to be economical with the truth when asked by pupils what their favourite colour is and, in the interests of good race relations, answer “black” or “brown”.

The measures, outlined in a series of guides in Nursery World magazine, are aimed at avoiding racial bias in toddlers as young as two.

According to the guides, very young children may begin to express negative and discriminatory views about skin colour and appearance that nursery staff must help them “unlearn”.

If children develop positive associations with dark colours, the greater the likelihood that the attitude will be generalised to people, it says.

The advice is based on an “anti-bias” approach to education which developed in the United States as part of multiculturalism.

It challenges prejudices such as racism, sexism and ageism through the whole curriculum and teaches children about tolerance and respect and to critically analyse what they are taught and think.

Ms O’Connor, who has worked with Newham and Tower Hamlets local authorities and recently devised equality material for Lancashire council’s Sure Start, early years and childcare service, said the approach developed children’s empathy and helped early years teachers to explore their own conditioning and possible prejudices.

“This is an incredibly complex subject that can easily become simplified and inaccurately portrayed. There is a tendency in education to say ‘here are normal people and here are different people and we have to be kind to those different people’, whether it’s race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age or faith.

“What we hope to do is help practitioners put themselves in the shoes of the child or the parents who is considered different. What we want for future generations is a sense of self that does not deny everyone else’s sense of self.

She added that helping to develop empathy in children should be central to the curriculum and not an add on or tick box exercise.

“People who are feeling defensive can say ‘well there’s nothing wrong with white paper’, but in reality there could be if you don’t see yourself reflected in the things around you,” she said.

“As an early years teacher, the minute you start thinking, ‘well actually, if I give everyone green paper, what happens’, you have a teaching potential.

“People might criticise this as political correctness gone mad. But it is because of political correctness we have moved on enormously. If you think that we now take it for granted that our buildings and public highways are adapted so people in wheelchairs and with pushchairs can move around. Years ago if you were in a wheelchair, then tough luck. We have completely moved and we wouldn’t have done that without the equality movement.”

Margaret Morrissey, a spokeswoman for the Parents Outloud campaigning group disagrees. She said: “I’m sure these early years experts know their field but they seem to be obsessed about colour and determined to make everyone else obsessed about it too. Not allowing toy witches to wear black seems to me nonsense and in the same vein as those people who have a problem with ‘Bar Bar Black Sheep’ or ‘The Three Little Pigs’. Children just see a sheep in a field, whether it be black, grey, white or beige. I have worked with children for 41 years and I don’t believe I have ever met a two year old who was in any way racist or prejudice.”

However, recent research by Professor Lord Winston provides evidence that children as young as four can hold racist views. In an experiment carried out for the BBC’s Child of our Time series, children were presented with a series of images of faces of men, women, boys or girls. Only one of the faces in each sequence was white.

Children were asked to pick out the face of the person they wanted as their friend and the person they thought would be most likely to get in to trouble.

Almost all white children in the survey associated positive qualities exclusively with photographs of white children or adults. More than half of the black children made the same associations.

In contrast, people with darker faces were viewed as troublemakers.

************

The above Telegraph article provoked 655 comments from readers. I just love this one by Alex J. Napier Holland:

Sadly I’m struggling to read your comments, as I have just painted my iMac’s screen in brown paint because the Telegraph’s white background was making me think about killing black people. I can’t read anything anymore, but am sure I will sleep well tonight because I’m – now – such a great, tolerant guy!

H/t Clash Daily

~Eowyn

Pottery Barn apologizes, pulls ‘offensive’ Halloween costumes

shushi

Seattle Times: Pottery Barn apologized for selling a Halloween costume of a sushi chef and a kimono that an Asian civil-rights group had complained were culturally offensive.

The retailer confirmed late Monday that the items had been removed from its website.

“We did not intend to offend anyone with our Halloween costumes and we apologize,” said Leigh Oshirak, vice president of public relations and marketing for Williams-Sonoma, parent company of Pottery Barn. “Thank you for bringing this to our attention.”

Asian civil-rights activists spoke out after the store began selling the products, a kimono and a sushi-chef outfit featuring the Rising Sun of the Japanese flag. The group demanded “immediate removal” of the clothing and requested an apology.

Our problem is not with the attire itself; it is with the fact that Pottery Barn is marketing these outfits as costumes,” wrote Ling Woo Liu, director of strategic communications for Asian Americans Advancing Justice.

She cited a student-led campaign launched at Ohio University several years ago, using the mantra “We’re a culture, not a costume,” and urging youths to think deeper when it comes to Halloween clothing.

The poster campaign sprung up on other campuses and includes phrases such as “You wear the costume for one night. I wear the stigma for life.”

She called Pottery Barn’s apology via email to the Los Angeles Times “very passive.” “It would help to show they have learned a lesson,” she said.

kimono

“Like other minorities, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are real people who cannot and should not be commodified as Halloween costumes,” Liu said.

“We were surprised, quite frankly, to see these costumes being sold by a retailer based in San Francisco, a progressive city where more than one-third of residents are of Asian American descent,” Liu wrote in the letter, speaking for multiple groups, including the Asian Law Caucus, which has its headquarters in the San Francisco Bay Area.

No cowboys, no Indians, no sombreros, no Rasta Man, etc., etc. While we’re at it, let’s get rid of all these costumes that “may offend” real people: dumb blondes, Geishas, a sheriff, policemen, firemen, Mariachis, babies, soldiers, princesses, and the Village People.

Political correctness strikes again.

DCG

Political correctness: ‘Brown bag,’ ‘citizens’ are out at Seattle City Hall

liberal

Seattle PI: Public affairs officers at Seattle city agencies were advised in a recent memo that use of the phrases “brown bag” and “citizens” are potentially offensive, and that the words must be chosen.

“Luckily, we’ve got options,” Elliott Bronstein of the Office for Civil Rights wrote in a missive entitled “On ‘brown bags, ‘citizens’ and language”.

“For ‘brown bag,’ try ‘lunch-and-learn’ or ‘sack lunch,’” wrote Bronstein. “For ‘citizens,’ how about ‘residents?’ (Our Citizens Service Bureau became the Customer Service Bureau a few years ago.)  Just thought I’d bring this up.  Language matters, and the city has entrusted us with the keyboards.”

What could be the offense of using “brown bag” or “citizens,” especially having witness Mayor Mike McGinn’s special pleasure at the swearing in of new U.S. citizens at the Seattle Center on Independence Day.

“This issue came up in one of the departments and I thought I’d send it around as an fyi for your consideration.  We often use the expression ‘brown bag’ to designate a bring-your-own lunch time event.  We also use the word ‘citizens’ as a synonym for ‘residents.’

“Innocuous phrases, right?  Mm, not so much for. For some people, the phrase ‘brown bag’ calls up ugly associations with use of the expression ‘brown bag’ to determine if people’s skin color was light enough to allow admission to an event, a home, etc.

“‘Citizens’ is a different case:  We sometimes use it as another way of saying ‘members of the public’ — except for all the members of the public who aren’t actually citizens but who live and work here.”

Asked on Wednesday how the issue of ‘”brown bag” and “citizens” came up, Bronstein answered:  “Boy, I don’t remember who raised it.  It has come up now and again in the past.”

“The term ‘brown bag’ doesn’t bother everybody, but . . . there is a history behind use of it,” he added.  “It is something easy to correct because there are alternatives.”

In Bronstein’s view, there are “a lot of normal terms once used as ‘normal’ that are not used so much any more.”  He cited, as example, the term “gyp” as a synonym for an attempt to cheat someone.  “I never realized until recently that it was shorthand for ‘gypsy’.”

City government has rightfully embraced all those who live within boundaries of the Emerald City.  Indeed, the Mayor’s office has lately explored with King County the possibility of finding a way to give  “permanent residents” the right to vote in local and municipal elections.

Language DOES matter — witness the recent excesses of Rush Limbaugh and various Fox News hosts — but isn’t the Office for Civil Rights trolling the far parameters of political correctness?  With McGinn’s new emphasis on social justice as a prerequisite to right-of-way decisions, can businesses locating here expect to be asked to adopt the nomenclature of “Residents” rather than “Citizens”?

DCG

Islamic Terrorism: The Russians “Get It”

russian-tactical-unit-2

Via breitbart.com:

Russia detains 140 suspected Islamic extremists

AP  4/26/2013 4:49:39 PM

(AP) Russia detains 140 suspected Islamic extremists

MOSCOW

Russian police and security agents have detained 140 people at a mosque in Moscow on suspicion of involvement with Islamic extremism.

A statement from the Federal Security Agency reported by Russian news agencies said among those detained in the Friday action were 30 citizens of unspecified foreign countries.

The detentions come a week after the two suspects in the fatal Boston Marathon bombing were identified as originating from the Russian region of Chechnya and sympathizing with Islamic extremists.

There were no immediate reports of charges being filed. The security agency referred The Associated Press to a district office, where the telephone was not answered.

The reports cited the agency as saying the mosque previously has been visited by people who had been involved in preparing or carrying out terrorist attacks.

-End

terror_attacksClearly the Russian government, no stranger to Islamic terrorism itself, is not encumbered by the self-destructive mental illness that is political correctness, as we seem to be hopelessly afflicted with it here in America.

Even our normally docile neighbors to the north appear to be catching on, and like the Russians, are taking proactive steps to try and protect their citizens from the 7th Century primitives.

Yet here in post 9/11 America, the supposedly most powerful nation the world has ever seen – a place where five Jihadists have successfully reached their targets since January 20th, 2009, the man charged with defending us from our enemies cannot even bring himself to utter the phrase Islamic terrorism.

I hope we will not wind up eating a couple of cities before this nation, and its government, finally wake up to the reality that is Islam.

-Dave