Tag Archives: New Orleans

Police going door-to-door in Zimmerman trial town in prep for riot

Sanford, FL — where George Zimmerman is on trial for murder for the death of teenager Trayvon Martin — has become another Watertown, Massachusetts.

Recall that on April 19, 2013, Watertown became an armed police state. Police in riot gear blanketed the small suburb of Boston, going door-to-door in search of the remaining bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, by bursting into homes with guns drawn, and marching residents out with their hands raised above their heads like criminals. (See “Boston Bombing: Getting the sheeple used to the police state,” April 23, 2013.)

Now cops are doing that again, in Sanford, FL.

Sanford FL policeSanford police chief Cecil Smith (l)

As WND reports, July 1, 2013, only this time at least they are knocking on doors instead of knocking them down.

While the media has portrayed Zimmerman as white, he actually has a Hispanic heritage.

Police say they fear a violent backlash from the community when the Zimmerman jury verdict is delivered. Los Angeles had days of rioting when the Rodney King verdict came down.

So Sanford Police Chief Cecile Smith sent cops to go door-to-door talking to people. Smith said, “Our worst fear is that we’d have people from outside the community coming in and stirring up … violence.”

Authorities are seeking help from local pastors in their campaign, too.

What police did in New Orleans during hurricane Katrina was even worse than in Watertown, MA. There, officers simply went into homes and confiscated weapons they uncovered.

Thousands of weapons – legally obtained and owned – were simply grabbed from citizens after New Orleans Police Superintendent P. Edwin Compass III announced, “Only law enforcement are allowed to have weapons.”

One man at a post-Katrina meeting assembled in conjunction with the National Rifle Association said, “The bottom line is this. Once they did it, they set a precedent. And what we’ve got to be sure [of] is that the precedent stops here.”

In a series of videos, the National Rifle Association has documented the stunning weapons grab by police in New Orleans, assembling videos that show them physically taking weapons from individuals, including one woman who was stunned when officers threw her against her kitchen wall because she had a small handgun for self-defense.

Go to the WND article for the videos. Here’s one I found on YouTube:

~Eowyn

Man refuses to be a victim; grabs gun from robber

This will make your day, I promise!

It was 5 a.m., Saturday, April 27, 2013.

Day had not yet broken and Burgundy Street in New Orleans was still dark and empty — except for a man walking, his attention on his cellphone.

But a robber was behind the man — with a shotgun.

The robber pointed the gun into his face, took his cellphone and demanded money.

The victim batted the weapon away from his face and grabbed it with his right hand — sending the attacker running in the other direction.

Joe Bonda, whose home security camera recorded the holdup, told local station WVUE: “”After he took the shotgun away, he chased the guy down the street. The guy ran right by his car, he didn’t even stop to get in his car and drive away.”

The Times-Picayune reports that the New Orleans Police Department said the attacker and an accomplice got into a black sedan and circled the block several times before pulling up to the victim to propose a trade. “Give me my gun back and I’ll give you your phone that you dropped,” the driver said.

No deal. Instead, the victim smashed the car’s rear windshield!

Bonda said, “I hope they can get the license plate off of one of the cameras. If the police can improve the video enough to get the number off the plate, then that would be great.”

A similar incident occurred the night before around 12:30 a.m. a block away from the other incident. Two young men tried to rob another person at gunpoint on Touro Street, hitting him three times, before the victim escaped without turning over anything.

Anyone with information about these two incidents is encouraged to contact NOPD.

[Source: New York Daily News]

Here’s the contact info for the New Orleans Police Dept:

Det. Michael Flores:
Ph: (504) 658-6707
Email: MFLORES@NOLA.GOV
or call CrimeStoppers: (504) 822-1111

I want to know who the non-victim is!!! Don’t you? :D

~Eowyn

Alabama city backs off on disarming citizens in a “disaster”

Here’s an example of the power of the New Media of bloggers.

We may not be successful at dislodging corruption and incompetence from the White House and Congress, but in case after case, the volunteer army of citizen bloggers are successful in countering small petty tyrants.

A recent example is the mayor and city council of Guntersville, a city in Marshall County, Alabama. Located at the southernmost point of the Tennessee River on Lake Guntersville, the population of Guntersville was 8,197, according to the 2010 census.

Mayor-Dollar

On February 26, 2013, Paul Joseph Watson of Infowars sounded the alert that Guntersville’s mayor Leigh Dollar was working with city officials to pass an ordinance that would give police the power to “disarm individuals” during a disaster.

The new rule would allow authorities to confiscate guns of “unruly” people during an extreme weather event such as the April 2011 tornadoes or any other emergency. “The ordinance states officers could disarm individuals, if necessary, reports ABC 31. “Dollar says the proposal is just way to give officers more authority to protect themselves.”

Dollar denied that the ordinance would be used to take away constitutional rights, but residents questioned why authorities would need to pass a new ordinance given that police already have the power to arrest citizens who are being “unruly,” whether armed or not.

Watson called the proposed ordinance “a chilling example of how the second amendment is being assaulted via the back door” and reminds us of what happened in New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, when the New Orleans Police, National Guard troops, and U.S. Marshals confiscated firearms and only law enforcement was allowed to have guns. The National Guard conducted warrantless house-to-house searches, targeting not just Hurricane-hit areas under the pretext of stopping violent looters, but also high and dry homes that were not even affected by the storm.

The Guntersville gun grab ordinance would be on the city council agenda at their meeting on March 4th.

Guntersville

After the story went viral, relayed by citizen blogger after blogger, Guntersville’s mayor Leigh Dollar backed down!

On February 28, 2013, four days before the city council’s meeting to consider the gun-confiscation ordinance, the City of Guntersville issued this statement on its website:

CITY OF GUNTERSVILLE

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS ORDINANCE STATEMENT

2-28-13

It was never the intent of the City of Guntersville Mayor or City Council to disarm individuals during a disaster.

As of February 27, 2013, the Emergency Preparedness Ordinance was officially withdrawn from consideration.

POW!!!

We won this one against little tyrants! :D

~Eowyn

Louisiana’s Corne sinkhole is a disaster in the making

The 2013 Super Bowl will kick off today at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, LA.

Responding to a satanic commercial that Mercedes-Benz made for the SuperBowl, A longtime reader of FOTM alerted us to a disaster in the making in the Louisiana bayou — a humongous sinkhole in Napoleonville called the Corne sinkhole that, if the salt dome collapses, will be as big as 30 football fields! The reader wrote: “In the Dark Knight, there’s a huge explosion – which begins underground – at a football game. I don’t look for prophetic events in movies, but things are really strange lately.”

As you can see in the Google map image below, Napoleonville is 75 miles west of New Orleans.

Napoleonville

I pray and hope that nothing untoward happens at the Super Bowl today (other than the usual trash at half-time like that satanic performance by Madonna last year).

Here are some pictures of the Corme Sinkhole, followed by a news account.

~Eowyn

Corne sinkholeCorne sinkhole1

La. salt dome collapse ‘sinkhole’ lake might be 30 football fields large

By – Examiner.com – Dec. 17, 2012

Louisiana Office of Conservation and Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure scientists have estimated that the Napoleonville Dome Collapse, the Bayou Corne “sinkhole,” could ultimately cover the equivalent of more than 30 football fields, or about 40 acres.

“If Highway 70 is shut down, we are shut down from the rest of the parish,” said Jamie Ponville, owner of Pierre Part-based Jamie Ponville Trucking LLC. Ponville was expressing one of many issues worrying Cajuns in the area of the collapsing 1-mile by 3-mile Napoleonville Salt Dome. Their Acadian homes balance above the dome and its ongoing leaking gas and earthquakes.

Scientists believe the “border of the maximum expansion of the sinkhole is anticipated to be well short of reaching Highway 70 and the Bayou Corne community,” says Louisiana Department of Natural Resources spokesman Patrick Courreges.

The collapsing area, filled with salt water and hydrocarbons with traces of hydrogen sulfide and radioactivity, once hidden by swamp oaks and other sub-tropical flora, can now be viewed from Hwy. 70, as this author observed and reported from the area in November.

The center of the Napoleonville Salt Dome is south of La. 70 and east of Grand Bayou, the collapsing slurry area, the “sinkhole,” and Bayou Corne.

Grand Bayou and Bayou Corne communities are both on top of the dome that stores pressurized oil- and gas-related chemicals.

From this historic event’s onset, when the collapsed area called a “sinkhole” was less than an acre, scientists and officials warned that the collapsing area consuming part of Assumption Parish was destined to continue growing.

The giant collapsing area in the swampland between Bayou Corne and Grand Bayou was reportedly found on Aug. 3 on property Texas Brine leases from Los Angeles-based Occidental Petroleum Corp., rarely in the news regarding this disaster.

Since this event’s onset, the collapsing Napoleonville Salt Dome “slurry area” has been swallowing trees, some over 100-years-old, on the western edge of the now 40-acre disaster site.

The discovery of the collapsed area followed two months of locals’ alarming reports to officials that earthquakes and gas bubbles were occurring. It was the “sinkhole,” however that prompted Gov. Bobby Jindal to declare a mandatory evacuation of approximately 150 homes.

Although the salt dome slurry area has increased four fold, the mandatory evacuation area has not, despite public outcry for the governor to expand the evacuation zone. The Louisiana governor has yet to make a public appearance at the 6-month disaster area. Such an appearance would provide national news attention that locals want, but not necessarily what the oil and gas industry want.

“Every day, the fossil fuel industry spends $167,000 on lobbying , and millions yearly on campaign contributions,” writes Adam Greenberg in partnership with GlobalPossibilities.org. “They spent $367 million on TV ads this past election alone. These lavish political expenditures ensure that politicians are more beholden to the fossil fuel industries than they are to We the People. Against the direct interest of America, they have set up a government largely of the fossil fuel industry, by the fossil fuel industry, and for the fossil fuel industry.”

In August, that industry caused a four-mile stretch of La. 70 between Bayou Corne and Pierre Part to temporarily close. The cause was attributed to “powerful forces” from an “unknown source,” as local officials had said. Those forces bent a gas pipeline up and to a right angle the day after the collapsed area in the swampland 50 miles from Baton Rouge was reported.

“You know that’s the main corridor for four parishes,” said Police Juror Henry Dupré.

Since 2003, the troubled swamp area has had three road closures due to oil and gas industry events. Those closures were noted when the Assumption Parish Police Jury adopted a an Aug. 22 resolution calling for the Louisiana Department of Transportation (DOT) to research a new “bypass” north of La. 70 to link it at the intersection of La. 69 and La. 996.

The DOT is seemingly moving at geological pace, only now announcing it will start preliminary plans for a new highway in case the new lake covers Hwy. 70.

Closures between La. 1 and La. 69 occurred in 2003 near Grand Bayou due to a gas leak at a well that pushed remaining residents, some who had been there for generations, off of their treasured land. Another closure occurred in 2010 when an oil well near Paincourtville, several miles down the road from Grand Bayou and Bayou Corne, had a blow-out.

The collapsing dome area, the so-called sinkhole, is west of La. 69 and south of Hwy. 70.

Subsidence on the perimeter of the dome has averaged about a quarter-inch annually, according to an August report, according to the Advocate. That concurs with an earlier report of a local fisherman, Harry Boudreaux, who said months ago that the dome has been sinking for a long time.

Bourdreaux used to crawfish in the 1960s near the area where the collapsed dome slurry now is. He’d have to climb a fence near Hwy. 70 and then, hike 500 feet through the woods to get to the once pristine bayou filled with critter edibles. “Now the fence is underwater and water’s right up against the road,” Boudreaux had said. “I think the whole dome is sinking.”

(See: Louisiana sinkhole engulfing entire 1-mile by 3-mile salt dome, Sept. 30, 2012)

Stephen Bauer, a geologist with Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M. with extensive salt dome research under his belt, said that the official August report shows typical subsidence for a salt dome containing oil and gas industry-related storage caverns.

Subsidence happens due to man-made environmental modification (ENMOD), removing material from underground and the salt creeping and closing in the hollowed out caverns.

If the new lake covers and closes Hwy. 70, it would cut off Bayou Corne and Pierre Part from nearby highways north and south that provide a direct route toward La. 1 and Napoleonville. Drivers would otherwise need to drive all the way through Morgan City or White Castle.

At the current rate of expansion, the collapsing salt dome area will engulf Hwy. 70 before the state’s transportation department’s “preliminary study” is due for completion, unless the sinkhole grows only in one direction – away from the highway, which has not been the case thus far. That is why it is now observable from the highway and was not before November.

If the collapsed area reaches the anticipated size, fears of it being a human and environmental sacrifice zone, as Dr. Wilma Subra discussed last week, will be realized.

The collapse will join Bayou Corne and Grand Bayou, as this reporter has suggested earlier. This man-made oil and gas industry disaster is destined to destroy life in those two vital streams.

Of equal consequence, it will also destroy one of the nation’s most precious and unique cultures, South Louisiana Acadians, Cajuns who have been squarely centered on those bayous for centuries.

_____________

To help protect human rights of Assumption Parish residents, sign the petition telling Governor Jindal to do the right thing and expand the mandatory evacuation zone. See: http://www.examiner.com/article/nation-tells-jindal-to-expand-la-sinkhole-evacuation-area

Deborah Dupré is author of “Vampire of Macondo,” 450 pages of censored stories about Corexit and the BP-wrecked Macondo Prospect in the Gulf of Mexico, continuing to cause catastrophic human devastation, that also continues to be covered up.

Woman complains about her taxpayer-paid rent-free apartment

In August 2010, there was a near-riot in Atlanta, Georgia, when 30,000 people stood in long lines in the sun in 90+ degrees heat, just for a chance to obtain an application form for a Section 8 public housing voucher. Some had waited in line for two days for the applications.

Like everywhere in America, public (i.e., taxpayer-paid) housing is in great demand in New Orleans.

In the wake of the terrible Hurricane Katrina disaster that put so much of the city of New Orleans under water, the federal government labored to provide public housing for the disaster victims and the poor. According to a report by D. Weaver for Nola.com, Dec. 18, 2007, Department of Housing and Development officials assured residents that the local public housing supply greatly outstripped demand, 1,762 public housing units were occupied and nearly 300 were available or within weeks of being ready at 8 Housing Authority of New Orleans complexes and at other scattered housing authority sites. Another 802 public housing units across the city were being repaired and would be put to use in the coming year.

In addition to the units available or scheduled to open soon, federal and local housing officials said their agencies would provide a total of 3,343 public housing units in the next 4 to 5 years, including nearly 900 units in planned mixed-income developments. The “mixed-income developments” would include 900 market-rate rental units and 900 homes for sale, many of which would be reserved for first-time home buyers, with financial subsidies designed to allow former public housing families to become property owners.

But public housing advocates were not satisfied. They complained that the target of 3,343 public housing units in New Orleans is still a drop of about one-third from the 5,100 units occupied before Hurricane Katrina.

Public housing officials responded that other demands for housing can be met through use of vouchers that can be used for private apartments that are inspected by the government. Nevertheless, housing activists complained that the “poor conditions” of those private apartments “deter renters,” that is, free-loaders.

Regardless of the conditions, many former public housing residents avoid privately owned apartments because they typically face utility and deposit expenses not charged in public housing.

The housing activists, aka Alinsky community organizers, then trooped out a victim of the “poor conditions” of those taxpayer-subsidized private apartments.

Meet Sharon Jasper, a former St. Bernard complex resident, who bitterly complained about her subsidized private apartment, which she called a “slum.”

Sharon Jasper in her well-appointed living room of her taxpayer-subsidized apartment. Note the large-screen TV. (photo by Ted Jackson/Times-Picayune)

Although a government voucher covered her rent on a unit in an old Faubourg St. John home, she griped about having to pay several hundred dollars in deposit charges and a steep utility bill.

Jasper said: “I might be poor but I don’t like to live poor. I thank God for a place to live but it’s pitiful what people give you. I’m tired of the slum landlords, and I’m tired of the slum houses.” Pointing across the street to an encampment of homeless people at Duncan Plaza, she said, “I might do better out here with one of these tents.”

Jasper allowed a photographer to tour the subsidized apartment. She complained about missing window screens, a slow leak in a sink, and a warped back door. The reporter noted that her subsidized apartment “otherwise appeared to have been recently renovated.”

H/t beloved Wendy.

To Sharon Jasper:

I’m one of the suckers who pay for your “subsidized” rent-free apartment, being among the 53% of Americans who still pay federal income taxes. My husband and I paid for our house with decades of hard work and savings. We don’t have a 60″ HD TV!

~Eowyn

The Great Flood That Everyone Forgot

There is an anonymously-authored article that has gone viral because it perfectly articulates what many Americans think. It was posted on the Arizona Tea Party website, among other places.

The article is about the Great Flood of 2009. That spring, the Red River hit a record level of 40.8 feet and flooded wide swaths of North Dakota and Iowa.

What’s that, you say? What great flood of 2009?

I can’t blame you, because I spent more than half an hour this morning “googling” for news on the flood, but found very little — which just goes to show the article is right.

By the way, the same article can be written about the Great Floods of 2011 along the Missouri River.

H/t beloved fellow Joseph.

~Eowyn

The Great Flood That Everyone Forgot

Seems like there is a big difference in attitudes when it comes to geography

After Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, Louisiana in 2005, the media blamed the lack of response on the Bush administration’s dislike of black people. Can we then conclude that the lack of media coverage and response by the Obama administration that Obama doesn’t like white folks?

Where are the Hollywood celebrities holding telethons asking for help in restoring Iowa and North Dakota and helping the folks affected by the floods?

Where is good old Michael Moore?

Why is the media NOT asking the tough questions about why the federal government hasn’t solved this problem?

Where are the FEMA trucks and trailers and food services?


Why isn’t the Federal government moving Iowa people into free hotels in Chicago and Minneapolis?

When will Spike Lee say that the Federal government blew up the levees that failed in Des Moines?

Where are Sean Penn, Bono, and the Dixie Chicks?

Where are all the looters stealing high-end tennis shoes, cases of beer and television sets?

When will we hear Iowa Governor Chet Culver say that he wants to rebuild a ‘vanilla’ Iowa because that’s what God wants?

Where is the hysterical 24/7 media coverage complete with reports of shootings at rescuers, of rapes and murder?


Where are all the people screaming that Barack Obama hates white, rural people?

Where are Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt, Oprah, and Ray Coniff Jr?

How come you will never hear about the Iowa flooding ever again?

Where are the gov’t. bail out vouchers? The government debit cards?

There must be one hell of a big difference between the value of the people of Iowa and value of the people of Louisiana.

****

And indeed there is!

From the U.S. Census Bureau:

Iowa:

  • Total population in 2009: 3,007,856
  • 93.9% white; 2.8% black

North Dakota:

  • Total population in 2009: 646,844
  • 91.9% white; 1.2% black

New Orleans:

  • Total population in 2006: 223,388
  • 28.1% white; 67.3% black

~Eowyn