Tag Archives: Google

Know where to spend your money: Companies celebrate U.S. Supreme Court ruling to legalize homosexual marriage

Daily Mail: Companies have thrown their support behind the Supreme Court’s decision to legalize homosexual marriage nationwide by announcing a host of commemorative products and gimmicks. Several businesses marked the landmark decision to allow homosexual marriage in all 50 states across America with tweets of support, snazzy marketing gimmicks and new products.

Among the most creative ideas was Ben and Jerry’s ice cream, which announced it would temporarily rename its chocolate chip cookie dough to ‘I Dough, I Dough.’ The ice cream flavor will be available in a commemorative pint sleeve at participate ice cream shops for a limited time.

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Another high profile firm – Google – changed the logo on its building in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan to one that featured a rainbow flag. The company’s office is the second-largest after the company’s headquarters in Mountain View.

Meanwhile, Facebook commemorated the big day by allowing its social media users to put a rainbow overlay on their profile picture by clicking on a link, according to ABC News. CEO Mark Zukerberg led the way by changing his profile page to one that featured the bright colors.

Passengers who used car-service Uber took screen shots of the moving icons of vehicles in the app as they had rainbow flags trailing behind them.

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The Maytag Man’s official Twitter account displayed two Maytag men as matching washer and dryer appliances. The slogan ‘perfect together’ was splashed across the image. And the tweet read: ‘Here’s to finding the one who completes you. #SCOTUSMarriage.’

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American Airlines tweeted an image of a plane’s television screens decked out in the colors of the rainbow. It tweeted the message: ‘We’re on board. Diversity strengthens us all & today we celebrate #Marriage equality & the landmark #SCOTUSMarriage decision.

Twitter users like Airbnb used the hashtag ‘#LoveWins’ and tweeted ‘Dear Supreme Court, We hope it’s not too soon to ask, but will you marry us? Love Airbnb

Hoards of official Twitter accounts including American Airlines, The White House and Hillary Clinton changed their profile images to include rainbow colors.  Snapchat users were offered two filters with rainbow themes to celebrate the historic ruling.

The Supreme Court ruled on Friday that the U.S. Constitution provides homosexual couples the right to marry, handing a historic triumph to the American homosexual rights movement.

The court ruled 5-4 that the Constitution’s guarantees of due process and equal protection under the law mean that states cannot ban homosexual marriages. With the landmark ruling, homosexual marriage becomes legal in all 50 states.

As for me? I celebrated homosexual marriage by going to Chick-fil-A for dinner Saturday night!

See also:

DCG

5M Gmail accounts hacked. Change your password *now*!

 

Fidel Martinez for Fusion.net, Sept. 10, 2014:

Time to change your password again. A database containing nearly 5 million Gmail user accounts and passwords was leaked on Bitcoin Security, a popular Russian website devoted to the cryptocurrency.

The text file was published on Tuesday night by user tvskit, according to CNews, the Russian news outlet that first broke the story. The leaker claimed that the majority of the accounts belong to users who speak English, Russian, or Spanish, and that approximately 60 percent are active. The passwords not only give access to Gmail, but a slew of other Google services such as Drive and the mobile payment system Google Wallet.

Svetlana Anurova, a Google representative, told CNews that the tech giant is aware of the breach and encouraged users to select a stronger password and enable two-step verification, a security measure where users are required to provide a passcode sent to their mobile devices before any changes can be made to their account.

The Gmail leak comes on the heels of two other major security breaches leaked on the same Bitcoin forum, which targeted Russian email service prodiver Mail.ru and search engine Yandex. Those two breaches affected nearly 6 million Internet users.

Find out if your account was compromised

You can verify whether your account was affected by clicking here and entering your gmail address. It’s that simple. You can also enable Google’s 2-step verification by following the company’s easy steps.

UPDATE 3:01 PM Google issued the following statement to Fusion:

“The security of our users’ information is a top priority for us. We have no evidence that our systems have been compromised, but whenever we become aware that accounts may have been, we take steps to help those users secure their accounts.”

Screw The NSA, New Search Engine Claims To Have The Solution.

before we get any further, let me just say there is no way at the moment you will be able to access the web site. It’s been OVERLOADed all day. Or under attack.  LOL

—————————————————————————————————

NEW SEARCH ENGINE PROTECTS YOU FROM NSA

No data collected, so nothing to give feds if they ask

 

WND EXCLUSIVE        BOB UNRUH

 

Zeekly

Zeekly

Trust Google? The National Security Agency, which routinely collects its data, does.

After all, it’s one of the companies from which Washington apparently routinely pulls data about what Americans are reading, doing, seeing, researching, hunting and contemplating.

So an entrepreneur says he has started an alternative service, which offers encryption services to keep your details, well, your details. Out of Google’s files. And away from the NSA.

The website is called Zeekly.com and founder Jeffrey Sisk explains it doesn’t retain search history, and also runs on 2048-bit SSL encryption to keep private what Internet users don’t want public.

On his blog, he explains that there are a number of steps a consumer can take to make the options for the government to access personal information a lot harder.

One of those is an encrypted search function.

“Like millions of Americans, I was frustrated when The Guardian broke the story on June 6th that the NSA has a top secret program called Prism that collects personal data on American citizens from all of the most well known and trusted technology companies. This included tech giants such as Google, Yahoo, Microsoft/Bing, Facebook, Youtube & Twitter,” he said.

“What made this story especially heinous as it unfolded is that each of these companies is prevented by the actual FISA court orders they were served from disclosing to the public their information is being intercepted by the government. These trusted companies all have privacy policies and tell their users ‘we take privacy matters seriously,’ yet we now find out millions of records are being secretly turned over to the NSA every single day. From the documents leaked to The Guardian by the NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, the government literally has unfettered ‘back door access’ to these vast databases.”

He said Americans now depend on the Internet.

“We find information, solve problems, pursue our interests, read news, make purchase[s], and socially connect with like minded people around the world. Granting access to American spy agencies to this level of information on American citizens is the most egregious assault on our constitutional rights regarding illegal search and seizure in the history of our country. As one of the original authors of the Patriot Act recently put it, they never intended the law to be used to snarf up mass amounts of data on unsuspecting American citizens. I think most of us already knew this was going on to some extent, but clearly this has far exceeded the original boundaries set forth by Congress.”

He continued, “I don’t think companies such as Google, Microsoft, Facebook or Yahoo are inherently bad. They collect this data to provide a higher level of targeted advertising and services for their users. Unfortunately, because of minimal oversight, the government is bending the rules to secretly obtain their data.”

And that’s the genesis for his Zeekly.com project.

It pulls information from all major search engines, but doesn’t store a users personal data, he said.

“This means that even if a court order [to obtain information] was presented, there’s no data.”

He said there are other steps that consumers also can take.

“Currently there are four main browsers that are popular in the market: Internet Explorer (owned by Microsoft), Chrome (owned by Google), Safari (owned by Apple), Firefox (open source owned by Mozilla).”

“Of these four browsers, the first three are owned by companies who are listed in the leaked NSA documents to be under FISA court order to turn over your search data. The last one Firefox seems to be exempt. This is because Firefox is an open source project (any software engineer/programmer from around the world can write code to improve the browser and then Mozilla coordinates what makes it into each new version of the software). Surely it is not impossible, but it is highly unlikely that Firefox has a mechanism to record your Internet searches. To me, this makes it currently the best choice,” he explained.

( I’ll Be resetting To Mozilla)

He also recommended the use of a Virtual Private Network. They are easy to install, he explained, and “it basically acts as your proxy when you are on the Internet. In other words, to the websites you are visiting, your requests are coming from the VPN’s server…. not your personal computer or cellphone/tablet.”

~Steve~
Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2013/08/new-search-engine-protects-you-from-nsa/#PmxOT0cKyWK45b0p.99

 

 

 

Have You Heard Of The Latest And Greatest? Of Course I’m Speaking Of Google Glasses.

A must have to make our lives so much more complete. here watch this vid  and just see how it will help.  LOL

Also just happened to see this on Drudge. Kinda amusing the implications.  LOL

‘CRACKED’ GOOGLE GLASS COULD MEAN HACKED ‘EYESIGHT’

http://www.carbonblack.com/cracked-google-glass-could-mean-hacked-eyesight/

~Steve~                                    H/T    My Newly Minted Teenage Son

 

5 tools to protect your privacy online

privacy

Every day it seems we hear more news about our online privacy being compromised and violated.

More than 2 years ago, we already were warned that companies and governments are gathering unprecedented amounts of data about every click, link, and status update you make. Google, for example, builds an online profile on its users, keeping track of our searches and the sites we visit.

Some very useful tips from Simon Black of SovereignMan.com, Feburary 15, 2013:

Online privacy is becoming more important by the day. And nobody is going to give it to you, you have to take steps yourself to secure it.

Below are five different tools and services that will get you started. You can set up most of the tools below in 5 minutes. Each of them will go a long way in securing your privacy online.

1. Tor Browser

Tor is a great weapon in the fight for online anonymity as it allows you to surf the web without giving up your location and other personal data to the websites you visit.

The Tor Browser Bundle is the easiest and most secure way to get started; simply download it, and start surfing the web with the Tor Browser. It’s available for Windows, Mac, and Linux.

Learn more about and download the Tor Browser Bundle here

2. Duck Duck Go

If you want privacy, don’t search with Google.

Google store all of your searches to customize ads for you, but even worse, they can hand over the whole list of searches to any government agency that are curious about what you’ve been looking at for the last couple years.

A better alternative is Duck Duck Go, a completely anonymous search engine that does not store any information about you or your searches. The search results are essentially identical to Google’s, so there’s no loss of quality.

Search with Duck Duck Go here

3. HTTPS Everywhere

HTTPS Everywhere (S is for security) is a plug-in for Firefox and Google Chrome that tries to force a website to connect in secure mode, thus encrypting your traffic with the website you are visiting. This makes your browsing more secure because it prevents eavesdropping thieves or state-mafia from intercepting your unencrypted Internet traffic.

Download HTTPS Everywhere here

4. Cryptocat

Cryptocat is an encrypted chat that beats Facebook and Skype when it comes to security and privacy. If you want to chat in private then this is one simple solution. It’s also open source, which means you can see the full code and be sure there are no government “backdoors” built in.

Read more about and download Cryptocat here

5. Silent Circle

Silent Circle is a new player on the market, but it is founded by “old” players in the security and encryption industry. One of the founders, Phil Zimmerman, is also the creator of PGP, one of the most-used encryption platforms in the world.

Silent Circle is a suite of products offering:

  • Encrypted email
  • Encrypted video chat
  • Encrypted phone calls
  • Encrypted text messaging

Silent Circle is the only service on this list that is not free. But having the gold standard of encryption may be worth it for you.

Read more about Silent Circle here

I’ve already started using Duck Duck Go as a search engine. Alas, Silent Circle does not yet offer encrypted e-mail service, but the site does say it’s “coming soon”.

~Eowyn

Warning: Your ZTE smart phone has a security hole

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Do you own a ZTE smart phone?

If so, you should know that there’s a security hole in your phone that could allow others to control it!

Employees of ZTE chat on the roof of its headquarters in Shenzhen, Guangdong provinceZTE headquarters in Shenzhen, China. (Photo by Reuters’ Tyrone Siu)

Jeremy Wagstaff and Lee Chyen Yee report for Reuters:

ZTE Corp, the world’s No.4 handset vendor and one of two Chinese companies under U.S. scrutiny over security concerns, said one of its mobile phone models sold in the United States contains a vulnerability that researchers say could allow others to control the device.

The hole affects ZTE’s Score model that runs on Google Inc’s Android operating system and was described by one researcher as “highly unusual.”

“I’ve never seen it before,” said Dmitri Alperovitch, co-founder of cybersecurity firm, CrowdStrike. The hole, usually called a backdoor, allows anyone with the hardwired password to access the affected phone, he added.

ZTE and fellow Chinese telecommunications equipment manufacturer, Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, have been stymied in their attempts to expand in the United States over concerns they are linked to the Chinese government, though both companies have denied this.

Most such concerns have centered on the fear of backdoors or other security vulnerabilities in telecommunications infrastructure equipment rather than in consumer devices.

[In April 2012] a U.S. congressional panel singled out Huawei and ZTE by approving a measure designed to search and clear the U.S. nuclear-weapons complex of any technology produced by the two companies.

Reports of the ZTE vulnerability first surfaced … in an anonymous posting on the code-sharing website, pastebin.com. Others have since alleged that other ZTE models, including the Skate, also contain the vulnerability. The password is readily available online.

ZTE said it had confirmed the vulnerability on the Score phone, but denied it affected other models. “ZTE is actively working on a security patch and expects to send the update over-the-air to affected users in the very near future,” ZTE said in an emailed statement. “We strongly urge affected users to download and install the patch as soon as it is rolled out to their devices.”

Alperovitch said his team had researched the vulnerability and found that the backdoor was deliberate because it was being used as a way for ZTE to update the phone’s software. It is a question, he said, of whether the purpose was malicious or just sloppy programming. “It could very well be that they’re not very good developers or they could be doing this for nefarious purposes,” he said.

While security researchers have highlighted security holes in Android and other mobile operating systems, it is rare to find a vulnerability apparently inserted by the hardware manufacturer. “I have never seen this before. There are rumors about backdoors in Chinese equipment floating around,” Alperovitch said. “That’s why it’s so shocking to see it blatantly on a device.”

A Google spokesman declined to comment.

~Eowyn