Tag Archives: CDC

Antibiotic resistant superbug has gone beyond hospitals into our homes

Bacteria increasingly are becoming resistant to antibiotics as a result of indiscriminate over-prescription of antibiotics as well as the misuse of antibiotics in the food given to corporate food animal factories. (Note: Antibiotics are useless against viral infection like the common cold.)

Already, there is a strain of bacteria that is resistant to the strongest antibiotics which appeared in hospitals. Now, this bacteria has moved beyond the hospital environment to U.S. homes.

nightmare bacteriaBenjamin Fearnow reports for CBS Atlanta, April 22, 2014, that the anti-biotic resistant “superbug,” Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is resistant to many of the strongest antibiotics.

Although recent prevalence has been limited to hospitals and nursing homes, a new study of 161 New York City residents who contracted the MRSA infections finds that the these people’s homes were “major reservoirs” for the bacteria strains, HealthDay reports.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) notes that in communities outside of health care settings, most MRSA strains are skin infections that are spread by physical contact, such as the sharing of towels or razors. Athletes, military barracks, prisons and other close-quarter living areas are at an increased risk of contracting and spreading the bug.

In medical facilities, MRSA causes life-threatening bloodstream infections, pneumonia and surgical infections.

But the new study shows that the MRSA has spread into average U.S. homes.

“What our findings show is it’s also endemic in households,” lead researcher Dr. Anne-Catrin Uhlemann, of Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, tells HealthDay, from the study published in the Proceedings for the National Academy of Sciences.

According to a report released by the CDC last September, more than 2 million Americans get drug-resistant infections each year. And about 23,000 die from these diseases that are increasingly resistant to the strongest antibiotics that doctors use to fight the infections.

Uhlemann and fellow researchers took samples from those affected by MRSA strains along with samples of a comparison group of people who had not fallen ill. The researchers then took samples from these patients’ household surfaces and other social contacts to see if the bacteria had spread.

Ultimately, the research showed that many homes outside of just those affected by MRSA were “major reservoirs” for the MRSA strain, USA300, which HealthDay notes is the primary cause of MRSA infections in communities throughout the country.

Bedding, clothes and other everyday surfaces used by someone affected by MRSA are suggested to be cleaned by bleach and hot water, although Uhlemann says the role of surfaces in transmitting the disease is not “well delineated.”

We can’t just treat the person with the infection,” Uhlemann told HealthDay. “We have to attempt to remove the (MRSA) colonization from the home,” and another MRSA expert not involved in the study added that the new study “confirms what we’ve suspected all along.”

Correct bandaging, protection of wounds, and hand-washing were suggested by experts as the best ways to protect family members and others whom one may come in physical contact with regularly, thereby spreading the bacteria to others.

The CDC has estimated that nearly one-in-three people carry staph bacteria in their nose, and typically feel no symptoms of sickness. About 2 percent of people carry MRSA.

The World Health Organization has previously stated that the overuse of antibiotics has become so common that even normal infections may become deadly in the future, due to the evolution of these bacteria strains.

“It is not too late,” CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden said to CBSNews.com during a press conference. “If we’re not careful, the medicine chest will be empty when we go there to look for a lifesaving antibiotic for someone with a deadly infection. If we act now, we can preserve these medications while we continue to work on lifesaving medications.”

Dr. Henry Chambers, chair of the antimicrobial resistance committee for the Infectious Diseases Society of America, told HealthDay he agreed, and that “about half of antibiotics prescribed aren’t needed.” 

A report earlier this month found that the drug-resistant bacteria caused a fatal blood infection in a Brazilian patient, according to Live Science. His body had developed a resistance to the powerful antibiotic vancomycin – used widely to treat the infection – during the course of his stay at the hospital.

See also “Alarming: Outbreak of antibiotics-resistant “nightmare bacteria” in Chicago,” Jan. 28, 2014.

~Eowyn

Pastors and bankers committing suicide

Nearly a year ago, Gabriela Segura, M.D. sounded the alarm that stress and depression have reached pandemic levels in America. She cited data from an article by David Kupelian that:

  • Fully one-third of U.S. employees suffer chronic debilitating stress, and more than half of all “millennials” (18 to 33 year olds) experience a level of stress that keeps them awake at night, including large numbers diagnosed with depression or anxiety disorder.
  • The CDC reported that antidepressant use in the U.S. has increased nearly 400% in the last two decades, making antidepressants the most frequently used class of medications by Americans aged 18-44. As many as 11% of all Americans aged 12 and older are currently taking SSRI antidepressants — highly controversial, mood-altering psychiatric drugs with the FDA’s “suicidality” warning label and alarming correlation with school shooters. Women are especially prone to depression, with almost 1 in 4 (23%) of U.S. women in their 40s and 50s now taking antidepressants.
  • Suicide has surpassed car crashes as the leading cause of injury death for Americans. More U.S. soldiers died last year by suicide than in combat.

A recent rash of suicides by pastors and bankers is symptomatic of the pandemic stress and depression.

PASTORS

1. Teddy Parker

Teddy Parker

Teddy Parker

On Nov. 10, 2013, Teddy Parker, 42, senior pastor of Bibb Mount Zion Baptist Church in Georgia, shot himself in the head outside his home while his 800 member congregation waited for him to conduct the Sunday service.

International Business Times reports that just days before, Parker had told his congregation that he felt disconnected from God. His body was discovered by his wife, Larrinecia, in the driveway of their house. Houston County Sheriff confirmed that he died from a “self-inflicted gunshot.”

2. Ed Montgomery

Jackie & Ed Montgomery

Jackie & Ed Montgomery

On Dec. 7, 2013, Ed Montgomery, a pastor at the Full Gospel Christian Assemblies International Church in Hazel Crest, Illinois, who was grieving the death of his wife a year ago, reportedly shot himself inside his Matteson home in front of his pleading son.

The Christian Post reports that Montgomery had said he was hearing the voice and footsteps of his late wife, Prophetess Jackie Montgomery. He later died from the gunshot wound.

3. Isaac Hunter

Isaac Hunter

Isaac Hunter

On Dec. 10, 2013, Isaac Hunter, former pastor of Summit Church in Orlando, Fla. and the son of Obama’s “spiritual adviser” — Northland Church Senior Pastor Joel Hunter – died from an apparent suicide.

Hunter founded Summit Church in 2002. It has since become one of the fastest-growing churches in Central Florida, with five locations and an estimated 5,000 worshippers. The church grew out of a ministry the younger Hunter started at his father’s megachurch. In 2012, Isaac Hunter resigned after admitting to an affair with a former staffer.

BANKERS

1. William Broeksmit

William Broeksmit

William Broeksmit

Bloomberg reports that on Jan. 26, 2014, William Broeksmit, 58, a recently retired executive at Deutsche Bank AG (DBK) who worked at Merrill Lynch in the 1990s, was found hanging in his home on Evelyn Gardens in London. Deutsche Bank spokesman Michael Golden didn’t give a cause for Broeksmit’s death and authorities aren’t treating the death as suspicious.

Broeksmit had built a reputation in “interest rate swaps” at Continental Bank in Chicago, which led Merrill Lynch to recruit him to be head of global equity derivatives. He was risk manager at Deutsche Bank AG. Interest rate swaps are contracts to exchange fixed-rate payments for floating-rate ones over a period of years.

2. Gabriel Magee

The offices of JP Morgan in the Canary Wharf district of LondonTwo days later, on Jan. 28, 2014, Gabriel Magee, 39, a JPMorgan vice president in technology operations, fell to his death from the 33 stories-high JPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM)’s London headquarters at 25 Bank Street in the Canary Wharf area onto a 9th-floor roof.

Magee was not a trader or a banker but had worked since 2004 in JPMorgan’s technology support department; he had previously worked as an application developer for Intel. Described by a source as “a respected employee, well thought of by managers,” Magee was pronounced dead at the scene by paramedics.

3. Mike Dueker

Mike Dueker

Mike Dueker

Two days later, on Jan. 30, 2014, Mike Dueker, 50, the chief economist at Russell Investments, was found dead at the side of a highway that leads to the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in Washington state.

Bloomberg reports that police said Dueker might have jumped over a 4-foot fence before falling down a 40- to 50-foot embankment, and that his death appeared to be a suicide.

Dueker was reported missing on Jan. 29, and a group of friends and law enforcement had been searching for him. Reportedly the economist was having problems at work, but Russell Investments spokeswoman Jennifer Tice said Dueker was in good standing and declined further comments.

Dueker had worked at Seattle-based Russell for five years, and developed a business-cycle index that forecast economic performance. He was previously an assistant vice president and research economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, where he published dozens of research papers over the past two decades, many on monetary policy. St. Louis Fed’s website ranks him among the top 5% of economists by number of works published.

4. Richard Talley

Richard Talley

Richard Talley

David Migoya reports for The Denver Post that on Feb. 4, 2014, Richard Talley, 57, founder and CEO of American Title, was found dead in his home from 7-8 self-inflicted wounds from a nail-gun fired into his torso and head.

Both Talley and the company he’d founded in 2001 were under investigation by state insurance regulators at the time of his death. It’s unclear whether Talley’s suicide was related to the investigation by the Colorado Division of Insurance, which regulates title companies.

Before coming to Colorado, Talley was a former regional financial officer at Drexel Burnham Lambert in Chicago, where he met his wife, Cheryl, a vice president at the company. When the two married in 1989, their wedding announcement in the Chicago Tribune described Talley as “a member of the 1980 U.S. Olympic swimming team.” But a spokeswoman for USA Swimming said Talley was not on the team.

H/t Charisma News; Zero Hedge; and FOTM’s swampygirl & josephbc69.

~Eowyn

Alarming: Outbreak of antibiotics-resistant “nightmare bacteria” in Chicago

nightmare bacteria

Here’s a little-known and little-publicized important piece of news.

Jason M. Breslow reports for PBS’s Frontline, Jan. 8, 2014:

The largest U.S. outbreak on record of one particular strain of a so-called “nightmare bacteria” is fueling alarm among public health officials about the spread of potentially lethal drug-resistant infections.

The outbreak, which has been traced to Advocate Lutheran General Hospital in suburban Chicago [Park Ridge], has so far infected 44 people, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since 2009, just 96 cases of the infection have been reported to the agency.

The bacteria strain, known as carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE), is a form of superbug that lives in the gut and can carry a gene called NDM-1 that is resistant to practically all antibiotics on the market today. Perhaps more alarming, the gene can jump from bacteria to bacteria, making treatable infections untreatable.

Before the Illinois outbreak, the largest spread of NDM-producing CRE that officials had seen was eight cases at a Denver hospital in 2012. When signs of the infection surfaced in Illinois, officials contacted 243 patients they believed came into contact with the bug during an endoscopic procedure. Of the 114 who returned for testing, 28 screened positive as carriers but did not have any symptoms. Ten others showed symptoms. The CDC also found six additional cases at a separate Illinois facility.

The bug at the center of the Illinois outbreak is among those detailed in a 2013 report by the CDC warning of “potentially catastrophic consequences” if action isn’t taken against the threat of antibiotic-resistant infections. That threat, which kills an estimated 23,000 Americans each year, was the focus of the recent FRONTLINE investigation Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria

From the Wall St. Journal (via Fox News):

“This is a huge cluster,” said Alex Kallen, a medical officer with the CDC and supervisor for the Illinois outbreak investigation, noting that only 97 cases of the infection have been reported to the agency since 2009.

The superbug, which typically lives in the intestines and is part of a large family of bacteria, can be spread via fecal matter. It isn’t typically transmitted by casual contact outside hospitals.

Carbapenems are one of the antibiotics of last resort for many bacterial infections. Enterobacteriaceae or enterobacteria refers to bacteria that live in animal intestines.

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) says CRE (carbapenems-resistant enterobacteriaceae) are “lethal bacteria that pose a triple threat”:

  • Resistance: CRE are resistant to all, or nearly all, the antibiotics we have – even our most powerful drugs of last-resort.
  • Death: CRE have high mortality rates – CRE germs kill 1 in 2 patients who get bloodstream infections from them.
  • Spread of disease:  CRE easily transfer their antibiotic resistance to other bacteria.  For example, carbapenem-resistant klebsiella can spread its drug-destroying weapons to a normal E. coli bacteria, which makes the E.coli resistant to antibiotics also. That could create a nightmare scenario since E. coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infections in healthy people.

CDC

That the antibiotics-resistant enterobacteria are spread via fecal matter suggests to me that this “nightmare bacteria” is transmitted via not just anal sex, but certain perverse sexual practices favored by homosexuals called “rimming” (oral-anal contact) and “brown shower” (copraphilia: oral ingestion of feces).

Both practices result in the “gay bowel syndrome” — of diseases such as Hepatitis A, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Epstein-Barr virus, Neisseria meningitides, Shigellosis, Salmonellosis, Pediculosis, scabies, Campylobacter, and typhoid. (See my post of July 3, 2013, “Medical consequences of homosexual sexual behaviors.”)

Now we can add to the above diseases the nightmare superbug enterobacteriaceae that not only is antibiotics-resistant, it actually breaks down antibiotics and easily transfers its antibiotic resistance to other bacteria.

God help us.

~Eowyn

The hypocrisy of Pres. Lucifer’s government shutdown

This morning, when I was writing the “America’s future: College students know all about twerking, but clueless about world leaders” post, I needed a piece of information — the percentage of Americans who are college students.

So I went on the federal government website National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), which is part of the U.S. Department of Education, but discovered that the entire website is blackened out, except for this message:

nces.edu.gov

.

So is the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

.

CDC.

So is the Department of Defense website:

.

DOD

Clash Daily discovered that Pres. Lucifer even shut down the Amber Alert website. When you try to go on that website, you’ll get this message:

amberalertwebsite_unavailable

So too with other federal government websites, except this one.

It’s Mooch’s Let’s Move website:

let's moveI took the above screenshot of Let’s Move with the date (10/7/2013) and time (2:56 PM) when I accessed it, as evidence.

President Lucifer has closed America’s national monuments, parks and even the Atlantic Ocean, threatened military priests with arrest if they dare to celebrate Mass voluntarily without pay, forced elderly and other Americans from their privately-owned homes, and closed down the websites of the U.S. Department of Education, CDC, DOD, and Ambert Alert — all because of the so-called government shutdown.

But Mooch’s Let’s Move website is open for business!

Because, you know, a website about kids exercising and eating healthy meals is just so much more important than the Vietnam Memorial, or our soldiers attending Mass, or the Ambert Alert, or . . . .

You self-serving hypocritical POS in the White House. You make me ill. svomit_100-121

~Eowyn

NH man who died of human Mad Cow Disease may have infected others

This tissue slide shows sponge-like lesions in the brain tissue of a classic CJD patient. This lesion is typical of many prion diseases.This tissue slide shows sponge-like lesions in the brain tissue of a classic CJD patient. This lesion is typical of many prion diseases.

A case of the human form of mad cow disease –  the always fatal  Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease – has just been confirmed in New Hampshire.

Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), commonly known as mad cow disease, is a fatal transmissible neurodegenerative disease in cows that causes a spongy degeneration in the brain and spinal cord. BSE has a long incubation period, about 30 months to 8 years.

Mad cow disease’s infectious agent is neither a bacterium nor a virus. Instead, the infectious agent is a protein called prion that cannot be destroyed even if the beef or material containing the prions is cooked or heat-treated. Prions remain viable even in high temperatures of over 600 degrees Celsius!

BSE is caused by cattle, which are normally herbivores, being fed the remains of other cattle in the form of infected meat and bone meal. Another contributory factor was the feeding of infected protein supplements to very young calves. The origin of the disease itself remains unknown.

When humans ingest BSE-infected meat — especially brain, spinal cord, and digestive tract tissue, although the infectious agent can be found in virtually all tissues, including blood — what results is Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

Before controls on high-risk offal were introduced in 1989, between 460,000 and 482,000 BSE-infected animals had entered the human food chain. By October 2009, CJD had killed 166 people in the United Kingdom — the country most affected — and 44 elsewhere.

mad cow disease

Greg Botelho reports for CNN, Sept. 21, 2013, that health officials have confirmed that a patient who underwent neurosurgery at a New Hampshire hospital earlier this year had Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease — a rare, rapidly progressing and always-fatal degenerative brain disease.

The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was confirmed by the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center, which reported its conclusion to New Hampshire’s health department and Catholic Medical Center on Friday.

The now-deceased patient had undergone neurosurgery at Catholic Medical Center in Manchester. But by the time CJD was suspected, equipment used in the patient’s surgery had been used several other operations. This raised the possibility that the equipment might have been contaminated — especially since normal sterilization procedures are not enough to get rid of the prions — thus potentially exposing the other patients to infection. So authorities in two states issued a warning that as many as 13 patients may have been exposed to surgical equipment used during the patient’s surgery, thus to the same disease.

People with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease typically show signs of rapidly progressing dementia, impaired vision and personality changes, among other symptoms, according to the National Institutes of Health. Yet while it can be suspected, the only way the disease can be confirmed is through tests conducted after a person’s death.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has a long incubation period before symptoms appear — sometimes up to 50 years – according the National Institutes of Health. There’s no test, so it may take many years before these patients would know if they were infected.

About 300 people a year in the United States come down with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC has said that no cases of the disease linked to the use of contaminated medical equipment have been reported in the United States since 1976.

Most medical devices are sterilized by heat, but the World Health Organization recommends the use of a caustic chemical like sodium hydroxide to disinfect equipment that may have come in contact with tissues that could cause Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

That’s just one reason — a minor reason — why I don’t eat meat.

~Eowyn

Brain-eating amoeba in metro New Orleans tap water

My husband and I have a morbid joke about the United States becoming a Third World country. Alas, the joke is getting less and less funny, as it becomes more and more real.

blood worms

First it was an Oklahoma town’s drinking water being infested with worms – icky blood worms, the larvae of small flies, up to half an inch long. (See photo above). Town officials have no idea how the worms got through the water filtering system.

Now we are told the tap water in New Orleans is infected with brain-eating bacteria.

Yikes!

The CDC says it's found Naegleria fowleri, an almost always deadly amoeba, in drinking water supplies for the first time in the United States.Naegleria fowleri, an almost always deadly brain-eating amoeba

Maggie Fox reports for NBC News, Sept. 16, 2013, that officials said a deadly brain amoeba that’s killed two boys this year has been found in a U.S. drinking water supply system for the first time — in metropolitan  New Orleans.

The Naegleria fowleri parasite killed a 4-year-old boy who likely got it playing on a back yard Slip ‘N Slide, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officials say. Tests show the bacteria is present throughout the water supply system in St. Bernard Parish, directly southeast of New Orleans.

Dr. Michael Beach, head of water safety for the CDC, said: “We have never seen Naegleria colonizing a treated water supply before. From a U.S. perspective this is a unique situation.”

N. fowleri is a heat-loving amoeba that’s usually harmless, unless it gets up someone’s nose. It’s not entirely clear how or why, but in rare instances it can attach to one of the nerves that takes smell signals to the brain. There, the amoeba reproduces and the brain swelling and infection that follows is almost always deadly.

It killed a Miami-area boy last month — 12-year-old Zachary Reyna — and a 12-year-old Arkansas girl, Kali Hardig, is recovering slowly after an unusual experimental treatment.

N. fowleri is usually found in warm, fresh waters all over the world. It’s been seen in hot springs and swimming holes, freshwater lakes and even in neti pots used to clean out sinuses. Incomplete disinfection probably allowed it to thrive in St. Bernard, which has its own independent water system.

“The key to this is understanding that this amoeba is kind of a heat-loving bug,” Beach said in a telephone interview. “If water temperatures start going up, you really need to be extremely careful about maintaining the disinfectant. The farther you go from a plant, the more likely you are for the disinfectant levels to get low.”

N. fowleri has only been reported in about 130 people in the U.S. since 1962, making it extremely rare. Kali Hardig is only the third person known to have survived infection. It was formally identified in 1965, in Australia, where it did contaminate drinking water systems for a while, says Beach.

“In Australia, it was basically water being pumped from rivers and overland,” he says. The water got warm over long distances across the desert, and the amoeba thrived. Three children died after being immersed in baths and wading pools. Better disinfection has meant no cases since 1981, Australian health officials say.

Lousiana health department spokesman Ken Pastorick says officials are flushing out and decontaminating the St. Bernard Parish system, a process that may take several weeks: “They have shocked the water, so to speak. What has caused the problem here is low chlorination.” Pastorick says other Louisiana water systems are safe.

Beach says proper chlorination should take care of the amoeba contamination. He stresses that water is safe to drink and bathe in even if it’s contaminated. Stomach acid appears to kill the amoeba, and people can protect themselves by not snorting water up their noses, or not allowing it to be forced up the nose.

St. Bernard water customers are being cautioned not to fill kiddie pools with tap water, or to use other water toys such as the sliding game that the 4-year-old boy who died was playing on. Topping up swimming pools with hoses is a bad, idea, too, unless the water first goes through the disinfection system.

Louisiana state epidemiologist Dr. Raoult Ratard says the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 may ultimately be to blame. Low-lying St. Bernard Parish, badly hit by the flooding that Katrina caused, was almost completely depopulated. Ratard explains, “You have a lot of vacant lots and a lot of parts of the system where water is sitting there under the sun and not circulating.” That provided a perfect opportunity for the amoeba to multiply. Without enough chlorine to kill them, they can spread.

~Eowyn

Email from sodium cyanide supplier

Sodium cyanideOn July 9, 2013 at 10:40 pm, FOTM received this unsolicited email from katie in China <katie@chenghuachem.com>, with “reliable sodium cyanide supplier” as the email subject (Note: Spelling mistakes are in the email):

Dear Friend,

Have  a nice day, knowing that you are  looking sodium cyanide, we an supply that.  specification as follwoing :

NaCN:98%min

NaOH:0.5% max

Na2CO3:0.5%

H2O%:0.5%

insoluable materrial :0.05%

package: 50/70kg/iron drum or 1T/wodden box

We are sincerely want to corporate with your respect company
Best regards
Katie

Cangzhou Chenghua Chemical Co., Ltd
No 216 Industrial Development Zone Yunhe district Cangzhou City
Tel:0086-311-87368842

Cyanide salts are among the most rapidly acting of all known poisons. This is what the CDC website says about sodium cyanide:

Agent Characteristics:

  • APPEARANCE: White crystalline or granular powder.
  • DESCRIPTION: Sodium cyanide releases hydrogen cyanide gas, a highly toxic chemical asphyxiant that interferes with the body’s ability to use oxygen. Exposure to sodium cyanide can be rapidly fatal. It has whole-body (systemic) effects, particularly affecting those organ systems most sensitive to low oxygen levels: the central nervous system (brain), the cardiovascular system (heart and blood vessels), and the pulmonary system (lungs). Sodium cyanide is used commercially for fumigation, electroplating, extracting gold and silver from ores, and chemical manufacturing. Hydrogen cyanide gas released by sodium cyanide has a distinctive bitter almond odor (others describe a musty “old sneakers smell”), but a large proportion of people cannot detect it; the odor does not provide adequate warning of hazardous concentrations. Sodium cyanide is odorless when dry. Sodium cyanide is shipped as pellets or briquettes. It absorbs water from air (is hygroscopic or deliquescent).
  • METHODS OF DISSEMINATION:
    • Indoor Air: Sodium cyanide can be released into indoor air as fine droplets, liquid spray (aerosol), or fine particles.
    • Water: Sodium cyanide can be used to contaminate water.
    • Food: Sodium cyanide can be used to contaminate food.
    • Outdoor Air: Sodium cyanide can be released into outdoor air as fine droplets, liquid spray (aerosol), or fine particles.
    • Agricultural: If sodium cyanide is released as fine droplets, liquid spray (aerosol), or fine particles, it has the potential to contaminate agricultural products.
  • ROUTES OF EXPOSURE: Sodium cyanide can affect the body through ingestion, inhalation, skin contact, or eye contact.

Am I in a waking nightmare? Since when can Americans purchase a deadly poison via email?

~Eowyn

Gay Inc. indifferent to 22% rise in HIV/AIDS among young sodomites

Gay Pride Parade, Miami Beach, 2013Gay Pride Parade, Miami, FL, April 14, 2013

Behind last month’s 5-4 Supreme Court ruling against traditional marriage is an even more alarming phenomenon: The tidal-wave change in American public opinion on same-sex marriage. In a matter of a mere 3 years, public opinion as measured by Gallup shifted from 44% approval of gay marriage in 2010 to the current 53% approval — a leap of nearly 10%.

That cultural change is the work of Gay Inc. — a trio of powerful and well-financed homosexual activist groups:

  1. Human Rights Campaign (HRC), America’s largest LGBT group.
  2. Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD).
  3. National Gay and Lesbian Task Force (NGLTF).

HRC, with a total budget of more than $40 million, had thrown an enormous amount of resources behind the “fight for gay marriage.” Its “Millions for Marriage” campaign had, quite literally, raised millions.

But, revealing its priorities, Gay Inc. is indifferent to the alarming 22% increase of HIV infection among young sodomites. If HIV continues to spread at current rates, half of college-aged gay men will have the infection by the age of 50.

american-aids-patientThis is what AIDS look like. (Source: HealthAdvisors.org)

Elizabeth Flock reports for US News, July 3, 2013, that in December 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released startling new data showing a 22% increase in HIV infections in young gay men between 2008 and 2010, although new HIV infections had remained steady in the general public. Gay men represented two-thirds of new infections. Nor are HIV drugs keeping them alive: Nearly 6,000 gay men were dying of AIDS every year.

Jonathan Mermin, the director of the CDC’s division of HIV/AIDS prevention, pointedly notes that “Gay and bisexual men remain at the epicenter of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. But HIV is not always at the top of the list of priorities for LGBT organizations.”

Gonorrhea is now antibiotic resistant

I’ve had this post in draft since August of last year. At the time, the post’s provisional title was “Gonorrhea becoming antibiotic resistant.”

Fast forward five months to now.

Newsflash! It is no longer a hypothetical future scenario. Gonorrhea has become antibiotic resistant.

Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the bacteria that causes the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea - scientists in North America noted in a study released on January 8th that they have detected the first incurable strain of the diseaseJames Nye reports for The Daily Mail, Jan. 8, 2013, that what U.S. public health officials long feared is now true: The first cases of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea have been found in North America.A study released by the Journal of the American Medical Association announced it had found nine patients with a strain of the sexually transmitted disease immune to the last remaining effective oral antibiotic.

This confirms the fears of both the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization who warned last year that untreatable gonorrhea, the world’s second most common sexually transmitted disease (STD), would soon become a reality. “These are the clinical cases we’ve been waiting for,” said study leader Vanessa Allen of Public Health Ontario.

Researchers observed that 6.7% of patients with gonorrhea at one Toronto clinic still had the disease after a round of cephalosporins, which is the last antibiotic which doctors are able to use to cure the disease. Out of 133 gonorrhea-afflicted patients who returned for a follow up visit, nine remained positive with the disease, which is roughly one in 15 people.

Adding to the growing fears of health officials in the U.S., Robert Kirkcaldy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) writes in an editorial that the disease is becoming a threatening disease: “Cephalosporin treatment failures have now been documented in North America. Although this milestone was expected, its arrival is deeply troubling.”

Gonorrhea infects near to 700,000 Americans each year – producing symptoms such as painful urination, abdominal pain, genital discharge, itching and infertility in women. Women who contract both HIV and gonorrhea are more likely to pass HIV onto their children than women with only HIV.

Just one year ago, Gail Bolan, director of the CDC’s sexually transmitted disease prevention program, had said that the “threat of untreatable gonorrhea is emerging rapidly.” At that time, only 1.7% of test cultures of the disease were considered immune in laboratory environments. Vanessa Allen said it proves how fast antibiotic resistance is evolving in disease and that “the problem appears worse than we originally thought.”

Although the nine patients in Canada eventually were cured with the injectable antibiotic known as ceftriaxone, Allen worries that the gonorrhea bacteria will soon develop resistance to ceftriaxone as well: “The next threat is when, not if, the same thing happens with ceftriaxone. And then what?”

To cope, the CDC recommends clinicians no longer prescribe a single antibiotic treatment for gonorrhea. Instead, doctors are advised to give patients an injection of ceftriaxone as well as a week-long course of oral azithromycin or doxycycline.

Meanwhile, the University of Toronto Student Union is merrily planning a sex orgy, oops, “an epic student sex club adventure” for next week, in the name of advancing the students’ “sex education.”

Sodom and Gomorrah, here we come! Whee!!!

~Eowyn

Do bacteria cause obesity?

Have you noticed how in old television shows from the 1960s, ’70s, and even ’80s, everyone looks thin?

Americans are too fat. Despite that, we are getting fatter.

According to Centers for Disease Control data, the obesity rate was relatively stable in the USA between 1960 and 1980, when about 15% of people fell into the category. It increased dramatically in the ’80s and ’90s and was up to 32% in 2000 and 36% in 2010. As of 2010, more than 1 of every 3 U.S. adults (about 36%) were obese, which is roughly 30 pounds over a healthy weight, and 6% were severely obese, which is 100 or more pounds over a healthy weight. Those percentages qualify as an epidemic. And it’s an epidemic afflicting all income and education levels

According to a new study led by Eric Finkelstein, a health economist with Duke University Global Health Institute, at the rate we’re going, 42% of Americans may end up obese by 2030, and 11% could be severely obese, adding billions of dollars to health care costs. That means 32 million more obese people within two decades, on top of the almost 78 million people who were already obese in 2010.

But it’s not just America. Obesity worldwide has more than doubled since 1980, according to the World Health Organization, with more than 500 million adults worldwide suffering from the condition according to 2008 statistics.

Extra weight takes a huge toll on health, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, many types of cancer, sleep apnea, senile dementia, and other debilitating and chronic illnesses. (Read more on obesity-associated morbidity here.)

This alarming increase in obesity has been attributed to Americans’ high-fat high-sugar diet, sedentary lifestyle, lack of exercise, and just plain gluttony. But new research suggests that a causal agent may be the enterobacter bacteria!

Enterobacter_aerogenes

An article in NewsMax Health, “Is Obesity Caused by Bacterial Infection?,” December 19, 2012, claims that researchers at Jiaotong University in Shanghai, China, have identified a bacteria which may cause obesity.

In a paper published in the peer-reviewed journal of the International Society for Microbial Ecology (ISME), the researchers report an experiment that found mice bred to be resistant to obesity even when fed high-fat foods became excessively overweight when injected with a kind of human bacteria and subjected to a rich diet.

The bacterium known as enterobacter had been linked with obesity after being found in high quantities in the gut of a morbidly obese human volunteer, The mice were injected with the bacterium for up to 10 weeks as part of the experiment.

The researchers conclude that the bacterium “may causatively contribute to the development of obesity” in humans, and that diets that alter the presence of microbes in humans could combat the condition.

A human patient lost over 66 pounds in nine weeks after being placed on a diet of “whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics,” which reduced the bacterium’s presence in the patient’s gut to “undetectable” levels, the paper said.

One of the report’s authors, Zhao Liping, lost 44 pounds in two years after adopting a diet of fermented probiotic foods such as bitter melon to adjust the balance of bacteria in his gut, the American magazine Science said in an article this year on his previous research.

This is what Wikipedia says about the bacterium enterobacter:

Enterobacter is a genus of common Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Several strains of these bacteria are pathogenic and cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised (usually hospitalized) hosts and in those who are on mechanical ventilation . The urinary and respiratory tracts are the most common sites of infection. It is also a fecal coliform, along with Escherichia. [...] In a recent study, over a 1/3 of gut bacteria in a morbidly obese volunteer was found to be Enterobacter. After 23 weeks, the volunteer lost almost 1/3 of his weight by virtually eliminating the bacteria via diet, while being prevented from exercising.

The “recent study” Wikipedia references is the same Chinese research that was published in The ISME Journal.

~Eowyn