Tag Archives: breast cancer

Unborn baby saves mother’s life by dissolving her cancer tumor

A baby at 4 months. Does this look like a tumor to you?

Pro-aborts refer to the baby growing inside a woman’s womb as a “parasite” and “tumor.”

In the case of a woman in England named Nicola Weller, the baby “tumor” in her womb actually dissolved her real cancerous tumor.

Steven Ertelt reports for LifeNews, Dec. 4, 2013, that Nicola Weller went to the hospital for surgery to remove a cancerous tumor from her womb.

There, a scan showed she was pregnant even though she had been fitted with the IUD contraceptive coil. But the scan also showed her pregnancy hormones had caused the tumor to disintegrate. 

In other words, Weller’s unborn baby saved her life.

Weller decided to carry the baby to full term and gave birth to a healthy baby boy named Brandon (see pic below) in September 2010.

Her cancer has not returned.

Brandon and Nicola Weller

The UK’s Daily Mail has more:

This is the miracle baby who saved his mother’s life – by destroying a cancerous tumour that was growing in her womb.

Doctors feared for Nicola Weller’s life when they discovered a tumour in her womb after she had complained about a swelling under her ribs.

Mrs Weller first discovered the swelling under her rib in September 2009. She went to see her GP who referred her to Bridport Community Hospital in Dorset for a scan.

Doctors told her there was a tumour growing around her womb and she needed an operation to remove it.

She was referred for a hospital scan 12 weeks later prior to an operation to remove it, but when they carried out the scan, doctors made the most startling discovery.

Weller, 29, was unknowingly seven weeks pregnant – despite using the contraceptive coil – and the pregnancy hormones had caused the tumour to disintegrate.

Mrs Weller, a recruitment specialist, said: ‘It was absolutely unbelievable. I hadn’t planned to get pregnant and I’d had the contraceptive coil fitted.

‘So getting pregnant was a miracle in itself – but to find that my unborn baby had caused this tumour to disappear was a further miracle. All that was left on the scan was a few blobs of blood floating around. There was no other sign of it. My baby ended up saving my life. Without him I may not have been here today.’

Nicola Weller’s experience is not so unusual.

In fact, there is stunning new scientific evidence that, far from being a  “tumor,” the human “fetus” actually is a symbiote — the exact opposite of a parasite.

The baby growing inside a woman’s womb passes his/her fetal cells — embryonic stem cells! — to the mother, and those cells protect the mother from breast cancer and other diseases.

More than that, the protective effect endures for the rest of the woman’s life — even if the woman had aborted killed her baby. [Sob...]

Read more about this in my post, “Baby in womb protects mom from disease,” Jan. 15, 2012.

~Eowyn

Miss May needs your prayers

Update (July 16):

Just got an email from Miss May. The surgery yesterday took longer than expected because of repeated problems with a “nuclear medicine” that must be “massaged” into her body. She is in good spirits: “I feel great.  Went across to the water, watched a turtle swim by, saw clouds building in the west, and the resident ducks.  I hadn’t seen them in a while and I was worried. Didn’t take pain pills this morning and made my scrambled eggs and jalapenos with toast. I am determined that I will survive.”

She thanks all of you for your prayers and positive thoughts, and sends you her love.

~Eowyn

prayer warrior

9 days ago, I did a post asking that you pray for a good friend of FOTM, Miss May, who had just been given a diagnosis of Stage 1 breast cancer.

I’m now asking that you pray even more fervently for her.

Since the initial diagnosis, May had had a biopsy. The news is not so good: Her cancer is Stage 2, and of the aggressive variety.

Tomorrow, she will undergo a lumpectomy. If all goes well, she will be released from the hospital the same day.

Please, please, say a prayer for May — a bold blogger who is “in the trenches” every day, fearlessly exposing the lies and machinations of the Obama regime and the powerful. We need this fierce political warrior healthy and vital!

Please, God, make her whole.

Thank you,

~Eowyn

Calling on FOTM’s Prayer Warriors!

prayer warrior

A good friend of FOTM needs your prayers.

She is Miss May, whom you have seen countless times being h/t (hat-tipped) at the end of many of our posts, for being the source of that news tip. She occasionally comments on FOTM as maziel.

Miss May is also a very talented writer of children’s books, photographer, and blogger. (Check out her blog Life On Sleepy Creek Today.)

Two days ago, May was diagnosed with Stage 1 cancer in one of her breasts. While that is bad news, it is manageable. Stage 1 means the tumor is smaller than ¾” in diameter and, since her lymph nodes are clear, doesn’t appear to have metastasized — that is, spread beyond the breast.

The good news is that she is in the hands of a very capable doctor, whom she respects and trusts. She must now decide whether she’ll have a lumpectomy or a mastectomy.

With recent advances in medical science and treatment, breast cancer is no longer a death knell, but very survivable, especially at Stage One.

Please say a prayer for our beloved Miss May — that our merciful and all-loving Lord, Jesus the Christ, sends His angelic hosts to assist her surgeon to remove the cancer — expeditiously and thoroughly — and help her on the road to full recovery.

Thank you.

~Eowyn

10 signs of cancer women shouldn’t ignore

From WebMD:

Beth Y. Karlan, MD, director of the Women’s Cancer Research Program at Cedars-Sinai’s Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute in Los Angeles, says warning signs do not mean cancer, even if you have all of them. But if your symptoms are “persistent and progressive, meaning you wake up every morning and feel something and it has you worried — even for two weeks in a row — it really is worth calling your physician and having it checked out.”

Regular checkups and screenings such as Pap smears and mammograms, as well as knowing your own body, are all crucial for good health.

Which changes are worth bringing to your doctor’s attention? Here are ten signs experts think you should keep on your radar screen.

1. Breast Changes

If you feel a lump, you shouldn’t ignore it, even if your mammogram is normal. If your nipple develops scaliness or flaking, that could indicate Paget’s disease of the nipple, which is associated with an underlying cancer in about 95% of cases. Any milky or bloody nipple discharge should also be checked out. Dimpling of the skin over the breast, particularly if it looks like the skin on an orange, is something to be worried about. Such dimpling is most often associated with inflammatory breast cancer, a rare, usually aggressive cancer characterized also by swollen, hot, red breasts.

2. Irregular Bleeding 

Once you hit menopause (defined as 12 months without a period), any postmenopausal bleeding is a warning sign. Any bleeding, staining, little drops on your underwear, or big clots are abnormal and should be immediately investigated. Such bleeding could indicate something as benign as an endometrial polyp or something more serious like endometrial or cervical cancer.

Bleeding that is uncharacteristic for you — spotting outside of your normal menstrual cycle or heavier periods. Around menopause, abnormal bleeding is often attributed to hormonal shifts, though more serious problems could be the cause, which is why all abnormal vaginal bleeding should be evaluated. Expect to receive a transvaginal sonogram and perhaps a biopsy.

3. Rectal Bleeding 

Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in women. One of the hallmarks is rectal bleeding, which many people attribute to hemorrhoids, the most common cause. But it’s not always that. Red or dark blood in your stool warrants a visit to your doctor. Your doctor will likely do a rectal exam and order a colonoscopy if you’re 50 or older and perhaps even if you’re younger.

4. Discharge 

A foul or smelly vaginal discharge could be a sign of cervical cancer. The discharge may contain blood and may occur between periods or after menopause. It’s best not to self-treat a discharge with over-the-counter medications. An exam is necessary to determine if the discharge is due to an infection or something more serious.

5. Bloating 

Ovarian cancer is the No. 1 killer of all the reproductive-organ cancers.  The four most frequent symptoms are bloating; feeling that you’re getting full earlier than you typically would when eating; changing bowel or bladder habits, such as urinating more frequently; and low back or pelvic pain. Pay attention if you have two or more symptoms occurring daily for more than two weeks. If they’re persistent and progressive, call your physician. Expect a pelvic exam, transvaginal sonogram, and perhaps a CA-125 blood test to check for cancerous cells.

6. Unexplained Weight Gain or Loss 

Gaining excess weight month to month — especially if you usually maintain a normal weight and watch what you eat — can be due to an accumulation of fluid in the belly related to ovarian cancer and warrants seeing your doctor. Unexplained weight loss of 10 pounds or more may be the first sign of cancer, according to the American Cancer Society, and is most often associated with pancreatic, stomach, esophagus, or lung cancer. But weight loss in women is often caused by a hyperactive thyroid. Expect your doctor to order a thyroid test first to check for this common disease.

lungs

7. Persistent Cough 

Any persistent cough — one that lasts more than two or three weeks and is not due to an allergy or upper respiratory infection or one that produces blood in the sputum– needs to be checked by your doctor. If your cough may be caused by smoking or being exposed to second-hand smoke, get it checked out. Smoking is the number one cancer killer of women, but you don’t have to be a smoker to be at risk. Expect your doctor to order a chest X-ray and perhaps a CT scan.

8. Change in Lymph Nodes 

If you feel hard lymph nodes in your neck or under your arm, you should be seen by a doctor. Swollen, firm lymph nodes are often the result of an infection. However, lymphoma or lung, breast, head, or neck cancer that has spread can also show up as an enlarged lymph node. Expect a physical exam and possibly a biopsy.

9. Fatigue 

Although fatigue can be hard to quantify, the American Cancer Society defines it as “extreme tiredness that does not get better with rest.” If you’re persistently fatigued, see your doctor. Leukemia, colon, or stomach cancer — which can cause blood loss — can result in fatigue. Fatigue can be a serious problem and it’s easy to ignore. Your doctor will most likely do a physical exam and order blood tests to evaluate your thyroid and rule out a thyroid condition.

10. Skin Changes

Keep an eye on any changes you notice on your skin all over your body, and call your doctor right away if anything concerns you. Sores in the mouth that don’t heal — especially if you smoke or drink alcohol – may be a sign of oral cancer and should be examined by your physician. In particular, note any sores or irritated skin in the vaginal area. A nonhealing vulvar lesion could be a sign of vulvar cancer. Changes in moles or pigmented lesions on the vulva can also signify cancer. Vulvar melanoma can frequently be overlooked and can have a very aggressive course. A simple biopsy can be done in your doctor’s office if necessary.

~Eowyn

5 surprising signs of cancer

Charlotte Libov reports for NewsMax Health, Dec. 18, 2012, that a top cancer surgeon says we mistakenly focus on pain as a sign of cancer. Instead, tip-offs to common types of cancer are generally not pain, but other signs, such as a new cough or a new lump on the body. Sometimes, pain occurs only after the cancer has spread.

Vadim Gushchin, M.D., a cancer surgeon at Baltimore’s Mercy Medical Center’s Institute for Cancer Care, says to watch out for symptoms like the five listed below. If you are experiencing one or more of these symptoms, but you’ve never experienced them before, although the likelihood is that you don’t cancer, you should get checked out by a doctor as soon as possible.

1. Sudden Shortness of Breath

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, responsible for nearly 158,700 deaths a year. Sudden shortness of breath, wheezing, fatigue, and trouble swallowing are sometimes signs of early lung cancer. Coughing up blood-tinged phlegm is a symptom that should get immediate attention. While coughing is the number one symptom of lung cancer, the problem is that nearly all smokers cough. And, although they are in the minority, people who have never smoked, especially those exposed to second-hand smoke or radon, can get lung cancer as well.  Smokers should undergo regular low-dose lung CT screening to catch any possible cancers as early as possible.

2. Unexplained Tiredness

Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer deaths, kills 50,000 people a year, or one person every 9.3 minutes, and it kills men and women equally. Symptoms include changes in the stool and bathroom habits, and fatigue. Because tumors bleed, the loss of blood can cause weakness and tiredness. People who smoke, drink alcohol excessively, and those who eat a diet high in red meat and low in fruits, vegetables, and whole grain are at a higher risk.

3. Sudden Waist Size Gain

Difficulty fastening clothing over a waistline that’s suddenly expanded may not be a sign of overindulgence, but bloating, which can be an early symptom of ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer kills more women each year than any other reproductive cancer, in part because early symptoms tend to be vague. However, bloating of a swollen belly, along with difficulty eating, feeling full quickly, abnormal menstrual cycles, gas, or pelvic or lower abdominal pain can be signals of the disease.

4. Yellowing of the Skin

Pancreatic cancer, a particularly deadly cancer, typically spreads with few symptoms. This is why, although fewer than 44,000 develop it each year, pancreatic cancer ranks as the nation’s fourth leading cancer killer. One signal is a yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes. As pancreatic cancer grows, it may block the bile duct that carries bile from the liver to the duodenum. This causes jaundice, which in turn leads to skin yellowing. Other symptoms include loss of appetite, weight loss, and abdominal pain.

5. Itchy Breasts

Most women dread finding a lump in their breast because it is the classic sign of breast cancer. But the first symptom of inflammatory breast cancer, a less common form of the disease, is an irritated, itchy breast.

~Eowyn

Father John Responds to Planned Parenthood

Our Young People are Hungry for the Truth!   here comes the catholic church

H/T  Kelleigh

~LTG

Baby in womb protects mom from disease

“Ultimately though, to have a ‘right to life’ requires that one be an individual capable of living an independent existence. One must ‘get a life’ before one has a ‘right to life.’ A fetus is not a separate individual – it lives inside a pregnant woman and depends on her for its growth. In fact, the biological definition of ‘parasite’ fits the fetal mode of growth precisely, especially since pregnancy causes a major upset to a woman’s body, just like a parasite does to its host.” -Joyce Arthur, “The Fetus Focus Fallacy,” Pro-Choice Press, Spring 2005.

The baby growing inside a woman’s womb is a nuisance, just a piece of tissue, a parasite. That’s what the pro-choice pro-abortion crowd want us to think.

The dictionary defines “parasite” as “An organism that grows, feeds, and is sheltered on or in a different organism while contributing nothing to the survival of its host.” Just like a tapeworm.

Tapeworm

But stunning new scientific evidence is showing that, far from being a nuisance, the “fetus” actually is a symbiote — the exact opposite of a parasite.

The baby growing inside a woman’s womb passes his fetal cells — embryonic stem cells! — to the mother, and those cells protect the mother from breast cancer and other diseases. More than that, the protective effect endures for the rest of the woman’s life — even if the woman had aborted killed the baby.

A baby at 4 months. Does this look like a tapeworm to you?

Peter Baklinski reports for LifeSiteNews, Jan. 4, 2012:

A standard pro-abortion argument hinges on the premise that a baby inside his mom’s womb attacks her bodily integrity. The developing baby is seen in this light as an intruder, a parasite, a threat to the woman’s autonomy. From this perspective the pregnant woman is viewed as being occupied. The only way she can continue to exercise her interest in bodily integrity, the argument goes, is to be liberated through the termination and expulsion of the invader.

But science paints a vastly different picture about the actual relationship between a baby in utero and his or her mother, showing that, far from being a parasite, the unborn child can help heal his mother for the rest of her life, as beneficial cells from the child pass into the mother’s body during pregnancy.

Science writer Jena Pinctott explores this relationship in her October 2011 book “Do Chocolate Lovers Have Sweeter Babies?: The Surprising Science of Pregnancy.”

Science has been studying the phenomena of fetal cell microchimerism for more than 30 years, after researchers at Stanford University were shocked in 1979 to discover a pregnant mother’s blood containing cells with Y sex chromosomes. Since women only have X chromosomes, they concluded that the cells must have entered into her body from the male baby she carried within her.

Drawing on studies in biology, reproductive genetics, and epigenetics, Pincott outlined in her book what science has learned since the Stanford discovery.

“During pregnancy,” she wrote, “cells sneak across the placenta in both directions. The fetus’s cells enter his mother, and the mother’s cells enter the fetus.” Scientists have discovered, she said, that a baby’s fetal cells show up more often in a mother’s healthy breast tissue and less often in a woman who has breast cancer (43% versus 14%).

Pinctott pointed out that as the quantity of fetal cells in a mother’s body increase the activity of autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis decreases. She called the evidence “tantalizing” that fetal cells may offer the mother increased resistance to certain diseases.

One kind of fetal cells that enter into the mother’s body is the baby’s stem cells. Stem cells have what Pinctott calls “magical properties” in that they can “morph” into other types of cells through a process called differentiation. The baby’s fetal stem cells can actually become the mother’s own cells that make up her liver, heart, or brain.

In what any ethicist might declare to be legitimate ‘embryonic stem cell therapy,’ the baby’s fetal stem cells migrate to the mother’s injured sites and offer themselves as a healing remedy, becoming part of the mother’s very body. Pinctott writes that such cells have been found in “diseased thyroid and liver tissue and have turned themselves into thyroid and liver cells respectively.”

Pinctott calls the evidence “striking” that a baby’s fetal cells “repair and rejuvenate moms.”

Genetics specialist Dr. Kirby Johnson of Tufts Medical Center, Boston, and professor Carol Artlett, a researcher at Philadelphia’s Thomas Jefferson University, back up Pinctott’s ideas. Their research shows that when a woman becomes pregnant she acquires an army of protective cells – what might be called a gift from her child – that remains with her for decades, perhaps till the end of her life.

Johnson and Artlett spoke to NPR’s Robert Krulwich in a 2006 interview.  In their research, Johnson found that a teaspoon of blood from a pregnant mother contained “dozens, perhaps even hundreds of cells… from the baby.” Science has shown that at the end of a mother’s pregnancy, up to 6 percent of the DNA in her blood plasma comes from her baby.

“One would expect them [the fetal cells in the mother’s body] to be attacked fairly rapidly. You would expect them to be cleared within hours, if not days. What we found is that that is not the case, not anywhere near the case,” Johnson said.

Artlett pointed out that even if a woman miscarries or deliberately aborts her child, the cells of the unborn child nonetheless remain with the mother, even for decades.

Both Johnson and Artlett defend the hypothesis that the baby’s fetal cells have a beneficent purpose, not to hurt the mother, but to protect, defend, and repair her for the rest of her life, especially when she becomes seriously ill. “There’s a lot of evidence now starting to come out that these cells may actually be repairing tissue,” said Artlett.

During the interview, Johnson told the story of one woman who was admitted into a Boston hospital with symptoms of hepatitis. She was an intravenous drug user with five pregnancies on record: one birth, two miscarriages, and two abortions. Johnson speculated that she would be carrying a lot of fetal cells.

In the process of examining her, the medical team performed a liver biopsy. A sample of her liver was sent to a lab to see if any fetal cells had congregated in the diseased area of her liver. What they found surprised them. “We found hundreds… and hundreds of fetal cells,” said Johnson, adding that they saw “literally sheets of cells, whole areas that seemed to be normal.”

Scientists are still trying to determine what causes the baby’s cells to work with the mother’s body in such a synergetic fashion.

Pinctott wonders how many people have left their DNA in a mother’s body. “Any baby we’ve ever conceived,” she concludes. Pinctott sees something “beautiful” in this. “Long post postpartum, we mothers continue to carry our children, at least in a sense. Our babies become part of us, just as we are a part of them. The barriers have broken down; the lines are no longer fixed.”

Perhaps it is not at all poetic to say along with Pinctott that a baby lives a lifetime in a mother’s heart and mind.

+++

Tears streamed down my face as I read this article….

Far from being a parasite on the woman’s body, from the moment of conception, the baby offers a precious gift to his mom — the gift of his own cells that heal and protect her from diseases for the rest of her life.

I’ll leave you with a quotable quote on abortion for all the Ayn Rand acolytes out there:

“One method of destroying a concept is by diluting its meaning. Observe that by ascribing rights to the unborn, i.e., the nonliving, the anti-abortionists obliterate the rights of the living.” – Ayn Rand, The Ayn Rand Lexicon.

Still think she’s wonderful?

~Eowyn

Risk of Breast Cancer Among Young Women: Relationship To Induced Abortion

Below is an abstract from a 1994 study done by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and University of Washington Dept of Epidemiology in Seattle. The complete study is available from the link.

~LowTechGrannie

Design by BKeyser

Background: Certain events of reproductive life, especially completed pregnancies, have been found to influence a woman’s risk of breast cancer. Prior studies of the relationship between breast cancer and a history of incomplete pregnancies have provided inconsistent results. Most of these studies included women beyond the early part of their reproductive years at the time induced abortion became legal in the United States. Purpose: We conducted a case-control study of breast cancer in young women born recently enough so that some or most of their reproductive years were after the legalization of induced abortion to determine if certain aspects of a woman’s experience with abortion might be associated with risk of breast cancer.

Methods: Female residents of three counties in western Washington State, who were diagnosed with breast cancer (n = 845) from January 1983 through April 1990, and who were born after 1944, were interviewed in detail about their reproductive histories, including the occurrence of induced abortion. Case patients were obtained through our population-based tumor registry (part of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of the National Cancer Institute). Similar information was obtained from 961 control women idenified through random digit dialing within these same counties. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios and confidence intervals (CIs).

Results: Among women who had been pregnant at least once, the risk of breast cancer in those who had experienced an induced abortion was 50% higher than among other women (95% CI = 1.2-1.9). While this increased risk did not vary by the number of induced abortions or by the history of a completed pregnancy, it did vary according to the age at which the abortion occurred and the duration of that pregnancy. Highest risks were observed when the abortion was done at ages younger than 18 years—particularly if it took place after 8 weeks’ gestation—or at 30 years of age or older. No increased risk of breast cancer was associated with a spontaneous abortion (RR = 0.9; 95% CI = 0.7-1.2).

Conclusion: Our data support the hypothesis that an induced abortion can adversely influence a woman’s subsequent risk of breast cancer. However, the results across all epidemiologic studies of this premise are inconsistent—both overall and within specific subgroups. The risk of breast cancer should be re-examined in future studies of women who have had legal abortion available to them throughout the majority of their reproductive years, with particular attention to the potential influence of induced abortion early in life. [J NatI Cancer Inst 86:1584-1592, 1994]
http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/content/86/21/1584.abstract?ijkey=c2ba7197c27b0a06a26cd85d26b079b0aed9bce2&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha