Category Archives: Republican Party

A revolution in politics is coming

Technology drives social and political change.

Just as newspapers and magazines are going out of business because of the Internet, and brick-and-mortar store sales increasingly are eclipsed by online shops, the day will soon come when how Americans do politics will also be up-ended.

That’s what long-time journalist Ron Fournier predicts in “The Era of Political Disruption,” in National Journal, Oct. 21, 2014. Below is his article:

From time to time in this column, I predict that the United States is entering an era of great political disruption, a bottom-up revolution on the scale of what upended the music, television, movie, media, and retail industries. Fueled by the radical connectivity of the Internet, abrupt new actors in those fields dismantled the status quo, shifted power downward, and created an explosion of options for consumers.

Consider what just one change wrought. You can now choose any musician’s song from any album, download it instantly and from virtually anywhere on earth for less than the price of a candy bar, and store it on a device with thousands of other tracks from just as many different singers. That’s power.

I ask you, how long until Americans recognized they’re no less equipped to disrupt politics and government? How soon before we stop settling for an inferior product in Washington and at statehouses? When do we demand more and better from the Democratic and Republican parties—or create new political organizations that usurp the old?

I don’t know the answers. I do believe it’s a matter of when, not if. Because, while we may be a presidential cycle or two away from the Great Disruption, you can already spot green shoots of populism emerging from an otherwise bleak midterm landscape.

Unsatisfied consumers: Disruption thrives when the status quo is not serving the needs of a changing public. Netflix, Amazon, and Buzzfeed wouldn’t exist if people had been satisfied with the way the entertainment, retail, and media industries were operating. The same American public that forced change on those industries is equally, if not more, annoyed with the political system.

A majority of Americans hold a negative view of the GOP, according to an NBC/Wall Street Journal survey. The Democratic Party’s image is underwater, meaning that more people disapprove than approve of the party. The percentage of Americans identifying themselves as independents is rising steadily, from 31 percent in 2004 to 44 percent in September, according to a Gallup study cited by Democratic consultant Doug Sosnik.

“Americans’ long-brewing discontent shows clear signs of reaching a boiling point,” Sosnik wrote a year ago. “And when it happens, the country will judge its politicians through a new filter—one that asks, ‘Which side of the barricade are you on?’ “

While many independents will vote Democratic or Republican, they’re doing so out of a lack of choice. Last year, NBC/Esquire commissioned a nonpartisan analysis of the electorate and determined that a full majority, 51 percent, make up a “New American Center,” voters whose attitudes and ideologies leave them without a natural home inside either the GOP or the Democratic Party. These voters share common values that run counter to the polarized, zero-sum ways of the two major parties.

Exacerbating this disconnect between the parties and the people is the public’s sour mood. Huge majorities of Americans say the country is on the wrong track. They see a grim future for themselves, their children, and their country. They believe their political leaders are selfish, greedy, and short-sighted—unable and/or unwilling to shield most people from wrenching economic and social change.

Ambitious disruptors: A handful of politicians are looking over the horizon and offering themselves as an alternative to the GOP and the Democratic Party. Independent candidate Greg Orman threatens to unseat GOP Sen. Pat Roberts in heavily Republican Kansas. Republican-turned-independent Larry Pressler has put the South Dakota race into play. A libertarian pizza delivery man may gobble up enough voters to determine the Senate race in North Carolina. In Alaska, Democrats are backing an independent Republican for governor.

In governor’s races, nearly a dozen incumbents are in various levels of danger; their challengers seizing the mantle of change.

Still, this year’s elections won’t result in a wave of newly elected independents, nor will a record number of incumbents lose their jobs. The Old Guard will conclude that the status quo is safe. But the Old Guard is a ship of fools, living on borrowed time. They remind me of smug newspaper publishers, music moguls, and bookstore-chain operators who were abruptly disrupted out of business.

“Look beneath the surface, and you’ll see this is more of an anti-incumbent, anti-establishment year than people realize,” said Joe Trippi, who helped bring modern technology to the political system while running a 2004 Democratic presidential campaign for Howard Dean. “Change is coming. Big change.”

Young disruptors: The ranks of the congressional candidates include a dozen or so millennials, people who came of age after 9/11. They include Elise Stefanik, 30, a Republican who helped me research a 2006 book about leadership when she was a Harvard undergraduate. Nick Troiano, 25, is running as an independent in Pennsylvania. “If I win, it will send a signal to Washington that you’d better watch out, that there’s a huge generation of millennials poised to disrupt politics as usual,” Troiano told me in April.

Even if the Old Guard defeats Stefanik, Troiano, and every other young candidate in November, they can’t stop the changes millennials would make to the system. This generation of Americans is relatively civic-minded, pragmatic, tolerant, diverse, and less interested in ideology than results. The only thing that can stop millennials from disrupting the system is the generation itself; young Americans are deeply disillusioned with politics and government, and their inclination to solve problems outside of traditional institutions could create a severe brain drain in Washington.

Conventional wisdom argues against even the remote possibility of an independent presidential bid; against the dismantling of old party structures and the creation of new ones; and against any structural reform to government. I get it. There are thousands of reasons why you might place your bets on the status quo.

I’ll put my money on the people. Trippi is right. Change is coming.

~End of Fournier article

the-powers-that-be-copy

The question, of course, is how this political revolution will come about. We haven’t yet figured out the way.

I propose that we begin by each of us going independent, i.e., registering as Independents unaffiliated with either of the two main parties. I did that 10 years ago.

For conservatives, the Democrats are demon rats. Voting for any Democrat is completely out of the question.

But if you think the Republican Party is the answer, think again. Please acquaint yourself with a curious legal agreement that the GOP entered into with the Dems — the 1982 Consent Decree — in which the Republican Party agreed to neither contest nor combat voter fraud. See my post, Why the GOP won’t challenge vote fraud.”

See also “America’s Bipartisan Ruling Class vs. the People.

~Eowyn

The demon is coming out of Obama again

Four years ago in mid-October, less than 3 weeks before the mid-term elections of 2010, it wasn’t looking good for the Democrats. Indeed, that was the election in which the Republicans wrestled a House majority away from Nancy Pelosi and her fellow Demonrats.

In campaign rallies during the weekend of Oct. 15-16, 2010, Obama was angry.

More than angry, he was frightening looking — which was noted by Drudge Report as well as Rush Limbaugh, who said, “An American president has never had facial expressions like this. At least we’ve never seen photos of an American president with facial expressions like this.”

These were some of the pics taken of Obama in those 2010 rallies. Trust what your instincts tell you.

Flash forward four years to another mid-term election campaign rally.

As in the midterm elections of 2010, once again it’s not looking good for the Demonrats.

The pic below was taken of Obama when he spoke at a rally for Gov. Pat Quinn, D-Ill., at Chicago State University on Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, in Chicago.

Look at his eyes!!! Trust what your instincts tell you.

evil angry ObamaAP Photo/Evan Vucci (Source: WOKV)

Here’s a close-up of those eyes.

evil angry Obama eyes Oct. 2014

I see anger, desperation, madness….

And behind those eyes, there’s nobody there.

Just emptiness. A vacuum.

Earlier that day, Obama was at a campaign rally in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, for the gubernatorial campaign of Maryland lieutenant governor Anthony G. Brown, in which members of the audience walked out while the president of the United States of America was still speaking. (See “Mainly black crowd walks out on Obama at Democratic campaign rally“)

As in 2010, once again Obama’s mask — the narcissistic psychopath’s charming social mask — is slipping and what emerges sure ain’t pretty.

It’s unholy and demonic.

See also:

~Eowyn

Dwindling Evangelicals will affect 2014 (and future) elections in Southern States

Robert P. Jones writes for The Atlantic, Oct. 17, 2014:

Over the last few decades, there have been few more reliable voters for Republicans than white evangelical Protestants. This year, however, GOP candidates may be getting less help from this group—not because white evangelical Protestants are becoming less supportive or less motivated, but simply because they are declining as a proportion of the population, even in Southern states. 

White evangelical Protestants have remained a steadfast Republican constituency in both presidential and midterm congressional elections ever since the Reagan presidency, which marked what political scientists Merle and Earl Black dubbed “the great white switch.” In 2008 and 2012, roughly three-quarters of white born-again Christians supported GOP nominees John McCain (73 percent) and Mitt Romney (78 percent).  In the 2010 midterm election, similar numbers of white born-again Christians (77 percent) supported the GOP House candidate in their districts.

[...] In recent years, for example, the Southern Baptist Convention, the largest evangelical denomination in the country, has reported steady declines in membership and new baptisms. Since 2007, the number of white evangelical Protestants nationwide has slipped from 22 percent in 2007 to 18 percent today.

A look at generational differences demonstrates that this is only the beginnings of a major shift away from a robust white evangelical presence and influence in the country. While white evangelical Protestants constitute roughly three in 10 (29 percent) seniors (age 65 and older), they account for only one in 10 (10 percent) members of the Millennial generation (age 18-29). In the last few national elections, however, because of high levels of voter turnout, white evangelical Protestants have managed to maintain an outsized presence at the ballot box according to national exit polls, representing roughly one-quarter of voters.

[...] there are currently five Southern states—Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, and North Carolina— where polling shows that the Senate race margins are less than five percentage points indicates that 2014 may be the year that the underlying demographic trends finally exert enough force to make themselves felt. These changes are evident in analysis based on the American Values Atlas, a massive interactive online map of demographic and religious diversity in America based on 45,000 interviews conducted throughout 2013, created by the Public Religion Research Institute in partnership with Social Science Research Solutions.

Evangelicals in 5 southern states

[...] Two forces account for the declining proportions of white evangelical and mainline Protestants: the growth of non-black ethnic minorities and, perhaps surprisingly, the growth of the religiously unaffiliated across the South. Notably, each of these growing constituencies leans decidedly toward Democratic candidates.

[...] So what does this mean for the 2014 elections? Certainly, events on the ground are still paramount; the campaign machines and peculiarities of candidates matter. And in low-turnout elections such as the midterms, the real weight of these demographic and religious shifts will not yet be fully felt at the ballot box. White evangelical Protestants have a strong turnout record, while non-black ethnic minorities and particularly the religiously unaffiliated are much less likely to vote. PRRI’s pre-election American Values Survey found that while two-thirds (65 percent) of white evangelical Protestants report that they were absolutely certain to vote in the November elections, less than half (45 percent) of the religiously unaffiliated report this kind of certainty. But the underlying trends indicate that at least one reason why there are a number of close elections across the South is the declining dominance of white evangelical Protestants, the most stalwart of GOP supporters.

Do you get the feeling that we’re losing the Culture War?  :(

~Eowyn

Actor Ben Affleck dislikes Republicans; defends Islam

ben-affleck-batmanFirst view of Affleck as the new Batman, sure to be a flop

Yesterday, actor Ben Affleck tweeted that “I do not like Republicans.”

This is conservative blogger KLSouth‘s response:

Ben Affleck

Today, Affleck’s tweet has disappeared from his Twitter account.

That means not only is Affleck intolerant, he’s also a coward.

Two Fridays ago on Bill Mayer’s show, Affleck ferociously defended Islam.

As recounted by the New York Daily News, Mayer was calling on liberals to defend liberal (i.e., freedom-loving) principles. He said, “Freedom of speech, freedom to practice any religion you want without fear of violence, freedom to leave a religion, equality for women, equality for minorities, including homosexuals, these are liberal principles that liberals applaud for. But then when you say in the Muslim world this is what’s lacking, then they get upset.”

Smugly claiming that he understands “the officially codified doctrine of Islam,” Affleck insists that radical Islamists are NOT the majority of Muslim views, and calls “gross, racist, and disgusting” any conception of Islam that is otherwise.

Hey, genius Affleck!

There is no “officially codified doctrine of Islam” because Muslims are bitterly divided between Sunnis and Shïtes. And because every 2-cent Muslim “teacher” can declare himself an imam.

Then there’s what the Quran says:

islam Religion of Terror

Affleck is out promoting his new flick, Gone Girl.

Make sure you stay away.

H/t Rebel Mouse

~Eowyn

New poll finds President Ebola and the Democrats in trouble

Pres Ebola overpass signSeen on a freeway overpass somewhere in America

Meanwhile, ABC News reports, Oct. 15, 2014, that a new ABC News/Washington Post poll finds that President Ebola and the Democrats “are heading into the midterm elections in trouble.”

The poll’s findings, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates:

  • The POS’s 40% job approval rating — STILL 40% JOB APPROVAL! — is the lowest of his career.
  • The Democratic Party’s popularity is its weakest in 30 years, with more than half of Americans (51%) seeing the party unfavorably for the first time, and just 39% see it favorably.
  • The Republican Party has a weaker 33%-56% favorable-unfavorable rating. But while the Democrats have lost 10 points in favorability just since August, the GOP has held steady – and its negative score has eased by 7 points in the past year. The GOP also benefits from its supporters’ greater likelihood of voting. All of which accounts for GOP candidates holding a 50-43% lead among likely voters for U.S. House seats in the Nov. 4 election.
  • 71% of Americans express worry about a terrorist attack.
  • 65% say they’re concerned about an Ebola epidemic.
  • Almost two-thirds say the country is headed seriously off on the wrong track.
  • Three-quarters are dissatisfied with the way the political system is working. Scorn is widely cast: Among those who are dissatisfied with the political system, two-thirds say both sides are equally to blame, with the rest dividing evenly between Obama and his party, vs. the Republicans in Congress, as the chief culprits. But as a nearly 6-year incumbent president, Obama – and by extension his party – are most at risk.
  • On which party they trust more to handle the main problems facing the country:
    • Among all Americans: it’s 39% vs. 39%.
    • Among registered voters: it’s 41% for the Republican Party vs. 38% for the Democrats.
    • But among likely voters this becomes an 8-point Republican advantage: 46% for the GOP vs. 38% for the Democrats.
  • Obama is at career lows in approval for his handling of immigration, international affairs and terrorism (long his best issue). Approval of his handling of the conflict with Islamic State insurgents in Iraq and Syria has plummeted by 15% in the last two weeks, amid questions about the progress of the air campaign now under way. (See “Obama’s ISIL strategy reexamined: air strikes ineffective; weak coalition“)
  • While Obama’s negative rating on handling the economy has eased, more Americans say they’ve gotten worse off rather than better off under his presidency:
    • 77% are worried about the economy’s future.
    • 57% say America has  been experiencing a long-term decline in living standards – all grim assessments as Election Day looms.

ABC poll on economy

Never forget that in Obama’s mind, there’s something wrong with you if you don’t think America is better off under his presidency.

See PDF of the poll with full results, charts and tables here.

~Eowyn

Romney tells a birther joke

On Sunday night (Oct. 12, 2014), while campaigning for 2014 U.S. Senate candidate Joni Ernst of Iowa, former GOP presidential nominee and Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney told a birther joke about President Ebola:

President Obama went to the bank to cash a check and he didn’t have his ID. And the teller said you’ve got to prove who you are.

He said, “How should I do that?” She said the other day Phil Mickelson came in, he didn’t have his ID but he set up a little cup on the ground, took a golf ball, putted it right into that cup so they knew it was Phil Mickelson. They cashed his check.

And then Andre Agassi came in. And Andre Agassi didn’t have his ID either. He put a little target on the wall, took a tennis ball and racquet– hit it onto that target time. We knew that was Andre Agassi so we cashed his check.

And she said to him, “Is there anything you can do to prove who you are?” And [Obama] said, “I don’t have a clue.”

And she said, “Well, Mr. President, do you want your money in small bills or large bills.”

H/t BirtherReport

Remember what the late Joan Rivers said to a reporter two months before she died, after going into a coma while undergoing a routine endoscopy?

She said, “We all know he [Obama] is gay and Michelle is a tranny.”

Just as Hollywood and the MSM “all know” we have a homosexual president and a transgender first lady, America’s political élites also “all know” about Obama’s bogus birth certificate and his constitutional ineligibility to be president of the United States.

But I do give Romney some credit for being the first nationally-known politician to bring up this subject, albeit in a joke.

See also:

~Eowyn

Did You Know That Republicans Are Responsible For Ebola?

No? Well folks I do believe the Dipwads of the Democrat party are running so scared that they just may have reached a new low in political advertising. Ebola = Death = GOP.  You know those LIV’s will put it together. Please watch it. It’s one minute. 

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The Agenda Project is a progressive non-profit political organization founded in 2010 by author Erica Payne. This ad, featuring clips of Mitch McConnell, Pat Roberts, and many other Republicans implies that austerity cuts to the Centers for Disease Control and National Institutes of Health are responsible for the 2014 Ebola outbreak. This ad with run in Kentucky and other states leading up to the election.

~Steve~