Category Archives: Religion

St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen (1577-1622)

St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen

Today, the Universal Church celebrates St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, the “poor man’s attorney,” who was also a courageous martyr for Our Lord Jesus Christ and His Church.

Fidelis was consistently generous and kind to the poor and the needy. If he saw someone who needed clothes, he would see to it that they received them. He practiced the spiritual and corporal works of mercy, pleasing Our Lord, who is Love and Mercy Itself!

He was born in 1577, given the name of “Mark Rey,” with his religious name being “Fidelis”. He became a lawyer, and in this vocation, he upheld the oppressed by taking their cases and litigating them, being given the nickname, “the poor man’s lawyer.” Fidelis had no use for the injustice, hypocrisy and corruption exhibited by those in the legal profession. Accordingly, he decided to become a priest, to give himself totally to Our Lord and His Church, wherein he entered the Capuchin Order joining his brother, George.

Fidelis became a guardian of a friary, and in this capacity, he continued to serve the needy and the vulnerable; he cared for many soldiers who were sick and wounded.

Fidelis was appointed to be in charge of a group of Capuchins who preached against the Calvinists and Zwinglians in Switzerland. He was successful in his preaching, but was accused of opposing the independence of the peasants from Austria. Fidelis planned to go to Seewis to preach, but was advised by his friends and colleagues not to do so as it would be too dangerous. Fidelis went anyway, but on his way back he was caught by a group of armed men and was murdered.

St. Fidelis was canonized in 1746 and was the first martyr to be recognized by the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith established in 1622.

Our Lord told us that he would vomit the lukewarm out of his mouth, as souls who are lukewarm He finds most repugnant. Clearly, St. Fidelis’ very life showed his intense love of the Triune God. He said: “Woe to me if I should prove myself but a halfhearted soldier in the service of my thorn-crowned Captain.”

We thank you dear St. Fidelis for your wonderful example of bravery, love, persistence and fidelity, whilst all the while making sure that you served God with all of your heart, mind, body and soul.

St. Fidelis, pray and intercede for us!

With love and respect,

Joan

Sources of research: Vatican website; EWTN website; Franciscan media

Please pray for Air Force veteran with lymphoma

praying hands2FOTM has powerful prayer warriors and you are needed!

Patriot USA, a good friend of FOTM, is asking us to please pray for a veteran of the U.S. Air Force who blogs as Findalis on “Monkey in the Middle.”

Findalis has just been diagnosed with lymphoma, a type of blood cancer.

From Patriot USA’s post, “Helping a friend in crisis“:

Here is a bit about Findalis from her blog:

“I’m in my 50′s, Female, Widowed, Mother of 2 grown children. I was born in Queens, NY, raised in Brooklyn and have the accent to prove it. I’m a veteran of the US Air Force. I worked as a Translator and Analyst. My theater of expertise was the Middle East. Just an NCO here. No need to salute me. I’m currently in semi-retirement, been outsourced once too often. I’m neither a conservative nor liberal. I am liberal on some issues and conservative on others. I vote my conscience. But on one issue I am very outspoken: The threat of Islamic Fascism and the security of the State of Israel!”

Please PRAY for Findalis and she is currently in the hospital in the Midwest. I am asking everyone who reads this to share this post, pray and if you can, help Findalis out. 

Findalis does not know that I am doing this and if anyone gets mad at me for doing this, I do not care. This person lives alone with a couple of cats and she does not have much in the way of financial security and barely gets by. She served in United States Air Force. Many people have assisted me at times the past couple of years and I really believe in paying it forward and just stepping in when a person needs a hand. She has been a really good friend to me from far away. If we can ease her burden a bit, I KNOW she would be extremely grateful and want to thank each of you.

Findalis, I’m offering my day to you — that our Lord Jesus the Christ envelopes you in a warm blanket of His mercy, grace, and love.

~Eowyn

Which Biblical character are you?

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Take this 10-question quiz to find out!

Click here!

P.S. I’m Noah:

You are a righteous man in a time of evil and corruption! You may not be perfect, but you have a heart of gold and remain loyal to the ones you love. Like Noah your strengths are your creativity, persistence and faithfulness

H/t FOTM’s CSM (who’s also Noah)

~Eowyn

How to Become a Millionaire (Part One)

Money

How to Become A Millionaire (Part One)

The following story comes from pages 100-103 of the book “Self-Made in America” by John McCormack with David R. Legge. The entire book is excellent and this story has always stuck in my head.

Compare the attitude and actions of the couple described below to that of so many Americans today – hundreds of millions, actually – who belittle the rich, while they moan and cry about their “right” to food stamps, section 8, welfare, “free” health care, etc. I think this story will provide excellent food for thought and many revelations on How to Become a Millionaire.

When Maryanne and I were building our Greenspoint Mall salon thirteen years ago, a Vietnamese fellow would stop by each day to sell us doughnuts. He spoke hardly any English, but he was always friendly, and through smiles and sign language, we got to know each other. His name was Le Van Vu.

During the day, Le worked in a bakery, and at night he and his wife listened to audiotapes to learn English. I later learned that they slept on sacks full of sawdust on the floor of the back room of the bakery.

In Vietnam, the Van Vu family was one of the wealthiest in Southeast Asia. They owned almost one third of North Vietnam, including holdings in industry and real estate. However, after his father was brutally murdered, Le moved to South Vietnam with his mother, where he went to school and eventually became a lawyer.

Like his father before him, Le prospered. He saw an opportunity to construct buildings to accommodate the ever-expanding American presence in Vietnam and soon became one of the most successful builders in the country.

On a trip to North Vietnam, however, Le was captured by the North Vietnamese and thrown into prison for three years. He escaped by killing five soldiers and made his way back to South Vietnam where again he was arrested. The South Vietnamese government had assumed he was a “plant” from the North.

After serving time in prison, Le got out and started a fishing company, eventually becoming the largest canner in South Vietnam.

However, when Le learned that the U.S. troops and embassy personnel were about to pull out of his country, he made a life-changing decision.

He took all of the gold he had hoarded, loaded it aboard one of his fishing vessels, and sailed with his wife out to the American ships in the harbor. He then exchanged all of his riches for safe passage out of Vietnam to the Philippines, where he and his wife were taken into a refugee camp. After gaining access to the president of the Philippines, Le convinced him to make one of his boats available for fishing and, again, Le was back in business. Before he left the Philippines two years later en route to America (his ultimate dream), Le had successfully developed the entire fishing industry in the Philippines.

Nevertheless, en route to America, Le became distraught and depressed about having to start over once again with nothing. His wife tells of how she found him near the railing of the ship, about to jump overboard. “Le,” she told him, “if you do jump, what ever will become of me? We’ve been together for so long and through so much. We can do this together.”

It was all the encouragement that Le Van Vu needed. He decided to fight one more time.

When he and his wife arrived in Houston in the 1970′s, they were flat broke and spoke no English. In Vietnam, however, family takes care of family, and Le and his wife found themselves ensconced in the back room of his cousin’s bakery in the Greenspoint Mall. We were building our salon just a couple hundred feet away.

Le’s cousin offered both Le and his wife jobs in the bakery. After taxes, Le would take home $175 a week, his wife $125. Their total annual income, in other words, was $15,000. Further, his cousin offered to sell them the bakery whenever they could come up with a $30,000 down payment. The cousin would finance the remainder with a note for $90,000.

Here’s what Le and his wife did:

Even with a weekly income of $300, they decided to continue living in the back room. They kept clean by taking sponge baths for two years in the mall’s restrooms. For two years their diet consisted almost entirely of bakery goods. Each year, for two years, they lived on a total of $600, saving $30,000 for the down payment.

Le later explained to me his reasoning: “If we got ourselves an apartment, which we could afford on $300 a week, we’d have to pay the rent. Then, of course, we’d have to buy furniture. Then we’d have to have transportation to and from work, so that meant we’d have to buy a car. Then we’d have to buy gasoline for the car as well as insurance. Then we’d probably want to go places in the car, so that meant we’d need to buy clothes and toiletries. So I knew that if we got that apartment, we’d never get our $30,000 together.”

Now, if you think you’ve heard everything about Le, let me tell you, there’s more. After he and his wife had saved the $30,000 and bought the bakery, Le once again sat down with his wife for a serious chat. They still owed $90,000 to his cousin, he said, and as difficult as the past two years had been, they had to remain living in that back room for one more year.

I’m proud to tell you that in one year, my friend and mentor Le Van Vu and his wife, saving virtually every nickel of profit from the business, paid off the $90,000 note, and in just three years, owned an extremely profitable business free and clear.

Then, and only then, the Van Vu’s went out and got their first apartment. To this day, they continue to save on a regular basis, live on an extremely small percentage of their income, and, of course, always pay cash for any of their purchases.

Do you think that Le Van Vu is a millionaire today? I am happy to tell you, many times over.

As I write these words, Le is in the process of starting or acquiring six substantial companies. Newspapers and magazines have written articles on the “miracle” of Le Van Vu. Recently, he met with the deans of several major business schools at my house, and they were in awe of what Le has been able to accomplish with his life – again and again.

Mike

St. Adalbert of Prague, Martyr (956-997)

St. Adalbert of PragueAdalbert was born to a prestigious family in 956 in Bohemia. At the age of 27, he was chosen as the Bishop of Prague in Czechoslovakia. As Bishop, he instituted a program of reform as to the clerics of his day, which was opposed by those clerics. As a result of his action, Bishop Adalbert was exiled for approximately eight years.

Because the people of Prague loved Bishop Adalbert, they requested that his exile end and that he would be returned to the important position of being their Bishop. Adalbert, again, enforced the Gospel by excommunicating those individuals who violated the right of sanctuary in a Church, because they had dragged a woman accused of adultery from the Church and murdered her. What immediately comes to mind is Our Lord Jesus Christ’s protection of a similar woman who was also accused of adultery, inviting the Pharisees and other accusers to cast the first stone if they had not sinned. As we recall, they all walked away. Accordingly, Bishop Adalbert was once again exiled because he exercised excommunication against these self-righteous criminals.

Bishop Adalbert ministered to the people in Hungary, and then went in 997 with two companions to preach the Gospel to people who lived near the Baltic Sea. All three of them were martyred by pagan priests from that area. Bishop Adalbert’s body was ransomed and then buried in Gniezno Cathedral in Poland.

It is never easy to stand up for what is right against the people you love or the people of your Faith. St. Adalbert of Prague was exiled on two occasions because of his reform of clerics and his upholding of the right of sanctuary wherein he excommunicated those people who violated that right and who murdered a woman as set out above. That is the mark of true love of God and His Gospel, that we always put Our Lord first, and conduct our behavior accordingly. Our Lord told us, “Take up your cross and follow me.”

And finally, St. Adalbert of Prague spread the Gospel to the people of the Baltic Sea, with his companions, which cost them their lives at the hands of the pagans. Clearly, St. Adalbert and his companions stored up their treasures in heaven as a result of their fearless preaching and their love of Jesus.

Let us follow the example of this wonderful Saint, Adalbert, putting God and His Gospel first above anyone and anything. Pursuant to the Roman Missal, Common of a Martyr in the Easter Season:

O God, you bestowed the crown of martyrdom on the Bishop St. Adalbert, as he burned with zeal for souls. Grant, we pray, by his prayers, that the obedience of his flock may never fail the shephered, nor the care of the shepherd be ever lacking to the flock.

St. Adalbert of Prague, pray for us and help us!

Respectfully,

Joan

Source: Franciscan Media; EWTN website

Painting the Resurrection

The Resurrection by Ron DiCianniFrom “The Resurrection” wall mural, by Ron DiCianni

Ron DiCianni is a Christian artist who dedicates his talents solely to the task of proclaiming the good news of the Gospel. His artwork has won him national recognition with  ABC, NBC, the  Smithsonian, and McDonalds, leading to a commission as official artist of the U.S. Olympic Committee for the Moscow  Olympic Games.

Ron DiCianniRon DiCianni

Given his accomplishments, one would think that DiCianni would merit an entry in Wikipedia. Not so.

Here’s a video of DiCianni describing and explaining his wall mural depicting our Lord’s resurrection from the dead.

H/t FOTM’s swampygirl

~Eowyn

Monday Morning Quickie!

HOW CATHOLICS KNOW THEY’RE DRIVING TOO FAST .

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~Steve~                                              H/T   Hujonwi

 

Easter toons!

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H/t FOTM’s Wild Bill Alaska

~Eowyn

The Empty Tomb

It was very early on the first day of the week and still dark, when Mary of Magdala came to the tomb. She saw that the stone had been moved away from the tomb and came running to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved. “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb,” she said, “and we don’t know where they have put him.” So Peter set out with the other disciple to go to the tomb. They…saw the linen cloths lying on the ground…and…believed. Till this moment they had still not understood the scripture, that he must rise from the dead. -John 20:1-9

Here’s a reconstruction of what happened from the book The Truth About the Shroud of Turin (Regnery, 2010), pp. 189-191, by my friend Robert K. Wilcox. No matter how many times I read this, it never fails to move me to tears.

The tomb, a rocky chamber carved out of a hillside, a stone rolled against the door, is dark and silent. Lying on a slab is a long, rectangular cocoon, the hills and valleys of which are clearly the contours of a human body. The body of Jesus lies there, face up, a ribbon around the head and chin to keep the mouth closed, packed on all sides with bags of spices.

At some unknown moment in the dead of night, the air in the tomb becomes electric.

At first the vibrations are minute, the sort that could be detected by sensitive twentieth-century instruments; then they dramatically increase until they shake the ground and blow the boulder from the door.

A glow, faint at first, emanating from the shroud suddenly intensifies until rays of light shoot through the threads, star-filled golden rays filling the tomb and pouring out the door.

For thirty seconds — no more — the blinding, pulsating movement continues.

The source of the activity is the corpse, the body, somehow being revitalized, dematerialized, its mass being converted into energy, pure energy, which in the material world is radiant white light.

The body rises from the slab through the cloth, hovers for a moment in midair, then disappears.

The cocoon collapses. Darkness returns. Shouts of “Earthquake! Earthquake!” diminish as the guards run for their lives. And in the air, the distinct odor of scorched linen.

When dawn comes, the women in Jesus’ life draw tentatively toward the tomb, look in the opening, and see the shroud unopened, still wrapped, but definitely deflated. The body is gone. At sunrise the disciples come. John enters the tomb, puts his hand on the cloth, and presses it to the slab. Jesus is there no longer. The disciples and the women quickly gather up the burial garments — the chin band is still in the shroud — and the spice bags and leave before the Romans can return.

At another time, in another place, when they have a chance to gather their wits, they will discover the figure of their master imprinted on the inside of the shroud. The images would be faint, probably not as dark as the passage of time and exposure to air have made them; and the images would be negative ones, a phenomenon that would also become clearer with the passage of time. Regardless, they would view these images as holy — imprints of their precious Lord. The disciples would pay more attention to the images on the shroud if they weren’t already waiting, with the greatest anticipation, for Jesus himself, who, before his death, had promised to visit them after he rose from the dead.

lilies

Our Lord is Risen!

A Joyous Easter to all!

~Eowyn

Saturday Morning Truisms.

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Most of my generation were HOME SCHOOLED in many ways.

1.. My mother taught me TO APPRECIATE A JOB WELL DONE
“If you’re going to kill each other, do it outside. I just finished cleaning.”

2.. My mother taught me RELIGION
“You better pray that will come out of the carpet.”

3.. My father taught me about TIME TRAVEL
“If you don’t straighten up, I’m going to knock you into the middle of next week!”

4.. My father taught me LOGIC
“Because I said so, that’s why.”

5.. My mother taught me MORE LOGIC
“If you fall out of that swing and break your neck, you’re not going to the store with me.”

6.. My mother taught me FORESIGHT .
“Make sure you wear clean underwear, in case you’re in an accident.”

7.. My father taught me IRONY
“Keep crying, and I’ll give you something to cry about.”

8.. My mother taught me about the science of OSMOSIS
“Shut your mouth and eat your supper.”

9.. My mother taught me about CONTORTIONISM
“Will you look at that dirt on the back of your neck!”

10. My mother taught me about STAMINA
“You’ll sit there until all that spinach is gone.”

11. My mother taught me about WEATHER
“This room of yours looks as if a tornado went through it.”

12. My mother taught me about HYPOCRISY
“If I told you once, I’ve told you a million times. Don’t exaggerate!”

13. My father taught me the CIRCLE OF LIFE
“I brought you into this world, and I can take you out of it.”

14.. My mother taught me about BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION
“Stop acting like your father!”

15. My mother taught me about ENVY
“There are millions of less fortunate children in this world who don’t have wonderful parents like you do.”

16. My mother taught me about ANTICIPATION
“Just wait until we get home.”

17. My mother taught me about RECEIVING
“You are going to get it from your father when you get home!”

18. My mother taught me MEDICAL SCIENCE
“If you don’t stop crossing your eyes, they are going to get stuck that way.”

19. My mother taught me ESP
“Put your sweater on; don’t you think I know when you are cold?”

20. My father taught me HUMOR
“When that lawn mower cuts off your toes, don’t come running to me.”

21. My mother taught me HOW TO BECOME AN ADULT
“If you don’t eat your vegetables, you’ll never grow up.”

22. My mother taught me GENETICS
“You’re just like your father.”

23. My mother taught me about my ROOTS
“Shut that door behind you. Do you think you were born in a barn?”

24. My mother taught me WISDOM
“When you get to be my age, you’ll understand.

25. My father taught me about JUSTICE
“One day you’ll have kids, and I hope they turn out just like you !”
*******************************
Quote of the day:  “Faith is not about everything turning out ok. It’s about being ok, no matter how things turn out.”

~Steve~                                            H/T Hujonwi