Category Archives: Health Care

Pattern of Misconduct: Woman Suffers Abortion-Related Medical Emergency

The good "doctor"...

The good “doctor”…

Operation Rescue:  An African-American patient of the notorious late-term abortionist LeRoy Carhart, 72, was transported to the hospital after suffering a medical emergency at Germantown Reproductive Health Services in Germantown, Maryland, on Wednesday, July 2, 2014.

This represents the EIGHTH known medical emergency for which Carhart has been responsible since March, 2012. The recently injured women include Jennifer Morbelli, who died on Feb. 7, 2013.

“Medical emergencies at Carhart’s two abortion locations are becoming more frequent. His age and grueling travel schedule compound the risks to women, who are paying for his mistakes with their health and sometimes their lives,” said Troy Newman, President of Operation Rescue. “Our complaints in Maryland are falling on deaf ears while woman after woman is transported to emergency rooms where Carhart isn’t even allowed to enter. The public safety emergency created by Carhart’s shoddy practices has reached crisis proportions.”

In addition to the Germantown office, Carhart also conducts abortions at his run-down abortion facility in Bellevue, Nebraska. Operation Rescue has documented the following incidents involving life-threatening complications suffered by Carhart’s abortion patients.

• July 2, 2014, Germantown, MD: African-American abortion patient transported to hospital.
March 4, 2014, Germantown, MD: Patient hemorrhaged after 2nd trimester abortion complications.
November 30, 2013, Bellevue, NE: Patient suffered 2nd trimester abortion complications.
November 26, 2013, Germantown, MD: Patient required emergency surgery. (Video with 911 recording)
July 9, 2013, Germantown, MD: Patient hemorrhaged. (Video with 911 recording)
February 7, 2013, Germantown, MD: Patient Jennifer Morbelli died of 3rd trimester abortion complications. (Autopsy Report)
March 31, 2012, Bellevue, NE: Patient heard moaning and screaming during 911 call (Video with 911 recording.)

Multiple complaints have been filed with the Maryland Board of Physicians. The most recent asked the MDBP to take a fresh look at Carhart in light of the previous seven medical emergencies. Nearly identical complaints were filed simultaneously with medical boards in Nebraska and Indiana, where he also has operated.

Nebraska and Indiana responded with letters confirming that they are investigating or considering investigating Carhart. Maryland responded with a letter as well, closing the complaint without investigation.

DCG

The 10 Plagues of America

“By this you will know I am the Lord.” -Exodus 7:17

Plague #1: Mayflies in mississippi river valley

Meghan DeMaria reports for TheWeek that every year mayflies leave the Mississippi River after one or two years of incubation, living for up to 36 hours before they return to the water, lay a new crop of eggs, and die.

However, this year’s mayfly hatch in the Mississippi River reached Biblical proportions and caused a bow echo on the National Weather Service (NWS) radar.

The La Crosse, Wisconsin branch of the NWS reports that the mayflies caused a three-vehicle car crash as they descended over the town. Two people were injured in the crash, and one was treated at a local hospital.

Below are two horrifying pics taken by Wisconsin residents of the millions and millions of flies:

Mayflies plagueMayfly plague

Plague #2: Antibiotics-resistant Superbugs

Mark Koba reports for CNBC, July 24, 2014, that cases of the contagious and deadly “superbug” known as CRE or Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae increased five-fold in community hospitals from 2008 to 2012 in the Southeastern U.S., according to a new study published in the August issue of the medical journal, Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

CRE is known as a “superbug” because the bacterium has a high mortality rate of 50% and because its various strains are mostly resistant to antibiotics. CRE usually strikes people in hospitals, nursing homes and other health centers, transferred from a patient to the hands of a care provider like a doctor or nurse, and from their hands to another patient. An estimated 9,300 people in the U.S. are infected by CRE every year, resulting in around 600 deaths.

Adding to the concern is a recent report by the University of Washington School of Public Health that another antibiotic-resistant superbug, MRSA or Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, had been found in firehouses in Washington state.

Researchers /tested 33 firehouses for the presence of MRSA. The bug was found at 19 of those firehouses on ambulances, trucks and on kitchen surfaces. Twelve crews reported having at least one member who had gotten an infection requiring medical care. No deaths have been reported.

MRSA causes a range of illnesses, from skin and wound infections to pneumonia and bloodstream infections that can cause sepsis and death.
Anyone can get MRSA through direct contact with an infected wound or by sharing personal items such as towels or razors that have touched infected skin.

There are more than 80,000 cases of MRSA detected each year in the U.S., with a reported 11,285 deaths.

All in all, there are at least 2 million illnesses reported each year from the various superbugs, resulting in more than 23,000 deaths, according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Medical experts say that the overuse of antibiotics in humans and animals has led to the spread of superbugs. Antibiotics are often used in livestock as a preventive measure. 80% of all the antibiotics sold in the United States are used in livestock production.

Perversely, that overuse is likely to continue in animals after a panel of the U.S. Second Court of Appeals ruled on July 24 that the Food and Drug Administration does not have to consider banning the practice of feeding antibiotics to animals that are not sick.

There are calls for stronger antibiotics to deal with the superbug spread. But Dr. Joshua Thaden, a Boston-based specialist in infectious disease, says that’s likely to just continue the vicious cycle of drug resistance because “the bacteria could end up resisting them as well.”

Plague #3: airborne pneumonic plague in Colorado

There are three main types of plague:

  1. Septicemic plague occurs when the bacteria proliferates in the bloodstream.
  2. Bubonic plague takes hold underneath the skin.
  3. Pneumonic plague, the most serious, is airborne and can be spread through coughing and sneezing when the bacteria enters the lungs.

Plague in all of its forms usually infects an average of seven people yearly in the U.S., and is found mostly in the western states of Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado, according to the CDC.

Sonali Basak and Jennifer Oldham report for Bloomberg, July 18, 2014, that a week after a Colorado man was found on July 11 to be infected with the deadly pneumonic plague, three more cases were found — the deadliest form of the disease reported in Colorado in a decade. 

All four cases may be linked to the original man’s dog, which died from the illness. Health officials suspect the dog might have been exposed to plague-infected fleas from a prairie dog or rabbit, said Jennifer House, a spokeswoman for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment department.

While the first victim is still hospitalized, the three subsequent cases were treated with antibiotics, recovered, and are no longer contagious.

Plague #4: Mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus

Meredith Engel reports for the New York Daily News, July 23, 2014, that Chikungunya is a painful virus spread by mosquitoes, for which there is no vaccine or treatment.

The recent Chikungunya epidemic began late last year in the Caribbean, then spread to Florida, then across the United States, with nearly 600 people reported to be infected.

The virus seldom kills its victims. Those infected often come down with a fever and significant joint pain, but heal in about a week.

Chikungunya, discovered in Africa 60 years ago, can’t spread human to human. The best way to ward off the disease is to take precautions against mosquito bites by using repellent with DEET, wearing light-colored clothing with long sleeves and pants when venturing outdoors, draining any standing water around the house, and staying indoors at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most plentiful.

Plague #5: Worst Drought in a Century in California

The nightmarish multi-year drought in the state of California continues to get even worse.

This week it was reported that 81% of California is now experiencing “extreme drought” or worse. Three months ago, that number was just 68%. Downtown Los Angeles is now the driest it has been since rain records began in 1877.

For more, please see Michael Snyder’s article, “20 Signs The Epic Drought In The Western United States Is Starting To Become Apocalyptic” and FOTM’s “California to have state-wide mandatory water restrictions Aug. 1.”

Plague #6: Wildfires in Western USA

Massive wildfires in Washington, Oregon and western Canada have spread clouds of smoke over vast areas of the northwest United States in recent days.

CNN reports, July 20, 2014, that four wildfires spanning almost 170,000 acres are driving hundreds of people from their homes in Washington state and across the border in Canada. The flames have encroached on towns. An estimated 80 homes were destroyed and cell phone service was knocked out

Plague #7: Swine Virus Killing Millions Of U.S. Pigs

The New York Times reports (via CNBC) that a deadly virus, porcine epidemic diarrhea or PEDv, is estimated to have killed more than 100,000 piglets and young hogs each week since it first showed up in Iowa in May 2013, wreaking havoc on the U.S. pork industry.

PEDv causes acute diarrhea that is virtually 100% lethal for piglets two to three weeks old. Paul Sundberg, vice president for science and technology at the National Pork Board, said, “I’ve been a vet since 1981, and there is no precedent for this. It is devastatingly virulent.”

The swine virus appeared in the United States last spring in Ohio and in weeks had spread to four more states. How it entered the U.S. is unknown, but the suspicion is that the virus came from China.

As a result of the deadly swine virus, the U.S. Agriculture Department says the number of hogs slaughtered this year is down 4.2% to roughly 50 million from more than 52 million in the same period in 2013. That, in turn, drove up the price of bacon by more than 15% and center-cut pork chops by almost 13% in May, compared with the same period a year ago, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Precisely how many pigs have died from the virus is unknown. The Agriculture Department did not require reporting of the disease until June 5, and it does not collect data on how many pigs the virus has killed, instead referring the question to the hog industry — which does not like to talk about it. The National Pork Producers Council does not have a figure of its own but said it had heard that about 8 million pigs had died of PEDv so far and approximately 100,000 more are dying each week.

Plague #8: Citrus Greening

Citrus greeningCitrus greening or huanglongbing is a disease spread by an invasive pest, the Asian citrus psyllid, which is sweeping across the citrus-producing regions of the world.

Kevin Loria reports for Business Insider, July 18, 2014, that at least 70% of Florida’s citrus trees are already infected by the disease, resulting in Florida’s citrus crop this year being the lowest it’s been in 30 years. Orange-juice prices are up nearly 20% this year alone and will continue to rise. The disease was a major factor in the lime shortage that made the price of a box of Persian limes jump from $18 to $85 last December. Researchers and growers say that if a cure isn’t found, the entire $9 billion Florida citrus industry could be destroyed.

Plague #9: Bananas may go extinct from virulent Fungus

Mark Koba reports for CNBC, April 21, 2014, that the world’s supply of bananas is under attack from a fungus called Panama disease or Fusarium wilt that could wipe out the popular variety that Americans eat.

Randy Ploetz, a professor of plant pathology at the University of Florida who in 1989 originally discovered a strain of the Panama disease called TR4, said “It’s a very serious situation” that may be growing into a serious threat to U.S. and Latin American banana growers. “There’s nothing at this point that really keeps the fungus from spreading.”

Bananas are the 8th most important food crop in the world and the 4th most important food crop among the world’s poorest countries. Through trade and supply, bananas make up a global $8.9 billion trade industry. Bananas are grown in more than 150 countries, which produce 105 million tons of fruit per year, while employing hundreds of thousands pf people. The U.S. is the top importer of bananas in the world at nearly 4 million tons a year. The largest exporters of the fruit are Ecuador, the Philippines, Costa Rica, Guatemala and Colombia.

Plague #10: Fukushima radioactive water in Pacific ocean

Japan’s Fukushima nuclear disaster that began in 2011 is continuing.

Hundreds of tons of radioactive water are being released into the Pacific on a continual basis, and this could potentially affect our oceans and our food chain for generations to come. There is a lot of evidence that it should be taken very seriously in the U.S., but it isn’t. In fact, former MSNBC host Cenk Uygur has admitted that while he was at MSNBC he was instructed not to warn the public about the radiation coming from Fukushima. (See “36 Signs the Media is Lying to You About How Radiation From Fukushima is Affecting the West Coast.”)

Japanese physician Dr. Shigeru Mita says residents of Tokyo, especially children, are displaying disturbing signs of radiation sickness:

Since December 2011, I have conducted thyroid ultrasound examinations, thyroid function tests, general blood tests and biochemical tests on about 2000 people, mostly families in the Tokyo metropolitan area expressing concerns on the effects of radiation. I have observed that white blood cells, especially neutrophils, are decreasing among children under the age of 10. There are cases of significant decline in the number of neutrophils in 0-1 year-olds born after the earthquake (<1000). In both cases, conditions tend to improve by moving to Western Japan (Neutrophils 0–>4500). Patients report nosebleed, hair loss, lack of energy, subcutaneous bleeding, visible urinary hemorrhage, skin inflammations, coughs and various other non-specific symptoms.

Dr. Mita concludes that “It is clear that Eastern Japan and Metropolitan Tokyo have been contaminated with radiation” and recommends that the entire city of Tokyo be evacuated.

As if the above 10 plagues aren’t enough, given the ease of global travel and  porous national borders (see “Illegals bring pneumonia and swine flu to Calif-Texas Navy bases” and “Obama’s Brown Shirts threaten health workers who divulge infectious diseases brought by tidal wave of illegals into America”), the following 3 horrific plagues may sooner or later spread to the United States:

Plague #11: MERS mutates into airborne pathogen

Meghan DeMaria reports for TheWeek, July 22, 2014, that the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) has claimed at least 288 lives since its appearance in 2012.

Now, researchers at Saudi Arabia’s King Fahd Medical Research Center have evidence MERS may be airborne, after air samples from an infected camel barn tested positive for a strain of the viral genome MERS RNA. Reports also found that some infected people had close contacts with other MERS patients.

Plague #12: Bubonic plague

Rachel Rettner reports for Fox News, July 23, 2014, that after a man died last week from bubonic plague, Chinese officials have sealed off an entire city, Yumen, in northwest China, preventing about 30,000 residents from leaving the city.

The man became ill after he handled a dead marmot (a large wild rodent), and died last week from bubonic plague. No other cases of the plague have been reported, according to the Guardian. About 150 people who had contact with the plague victim have been placed under quarantine.

Bubonic plague is an infectious disease known for killing millions of people in Europe in the 1300s, in a pandemic called the Black Death. It is caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis that is carried by rodents, and can be transmitted to people through flea bites or by direct contact with the tissues or fluids of an animal with plague, according to the CDC.

Bubonic plague causes swelling of the lymph nodes, and it cannot be spread from person to person. However, if the disease spreads to the lungs, the person can develop pneumonic plague (see Plague #3), which can be transmitted from person to person if a sick individual coughs droplets into the air, and another person inhales the droplets. But person-to-person transmission is rare, and usually requires close contact with the infected individual.

Today, bubonic plague is treatable with antibiotics, the CDC says. (See, however, Plague #2: Antibiotics-Resistant Superbugs!) Now there are fewer than 5,000 cases of plague per year worldwide, with most cases occurring in Africa, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Plague #13: Ebola

Ebola is one of the world’s deadliest viruses with a high fatality rate of 60% to 90%. There is no vaccine. There is no cure.

First identified in 1976 in the sub-Saharan jungles of Zaire and the Sudan, Ebola was transmitted to humans via the blood or bodily fluids of an infected fruit bat or monkey.

Symptoms typical of an Ebola infection begin 2 days to 3 weeks after contacting the virus — those of fever, throat and muscle pains, and headaches. Then it gets worse, with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and decreased functioning of the liver and kidneys. Then it gets even worse. The infected starts hemorrhaging or bleeding from the body’s mucous membranes — mouth (gums), nose, gastrointestinal tract, and vagina.

In June 2014, I posted on how the Ebola virus had made the jump from the jungles to West Africa’s urban centers. At that time, Dr. Bart Janssens of the charity group Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) had said the Ebola epidemic is now “out of control” in West Africa and warned that the epidemic would spread to more countries, unless there’s a stronger international response — which there wasn’t.

The latest: Sierra Leone’s chief Ebola doctor has himself contracted Ebola.

Reuters reports that 39-year-old Sheik Umar Khan, hailed as a “national hero” by Sierra Leone’s health ministry, had led the fight to control the Ebola outbreak that has killed 206 people in his country but now has caught the deadline disease that kills up to 90% of those infected and there is no cure or vaccine.

Even worse, yesterday Nigeria’s ministry of health said Ebola may have hit Lagos, Nigeria’s capital and the most populous city in Africa.

A Liberian man, who had worked and lived in Liberia where Ebola is prevalent, had collapsed at Lagos’s airport displaying symptoms of the disease. The Nigeria government has sent the man’s blood samples to the World Health Organization to be tested.

H/t ZeroHedge and FOTM’s swampygirl, josephbc69, and pnordman.

~Eowyn

New diet aid! Guaranteed to help you eat less, lose weight!

New diet aid

H/t FOTM’s Wild Bill Alaska

~Eowyn

A.A.A.D.D.- KNOW THE SYMPTOMS! This Is Good. HeHeHe

Thank goodness there’s a name for this disorder.
Age-Activated Attention Deficit Disorder.

This is how it manifests:

I decide to water my garden.
As I turn on the hose in the driveway,
I look over at my car and decide it needs washing.

As I start toward the garage,
I notice mail on the porch table that
I brought up from the mail box earlier.

I decide to go through the mail before I wash the car.

I lay my car keys on the table,
Put the junk mail in the garbage can under the table,
And notice that the can is full.

So, I decide to put the bills back
On the table and take out the garbage first…

But then I think,
Since I’m going to be near the mailbox
When I take out the garbage anyway,
I may as well pay the bills first.

I take my cheque book off the table,
And see that there is only one cheque left.

My extra cheques are in my desk in the study, So I go inside the house to my desk where
I find the can of Pepsi I’d been drinking.

I’m going to look for my checks,
But first I need to push the Pepsi aside
So that I don’t accidentally knock it over.

The Pepsi is getting warm,
And I decide to put it in the refrigerator to keep it cold.

As I head toward the kitchen with the Pepsi,
A vase of flowers on the counter
Catches my eye–they need water.

I put the Pepsi on the counter and
Discover my reading glasses that
I’ve been searching for all morning.
I decide I better put them back on my desk,
But first I’m going to water the flowers.

I set the glasses back down on the counter ,
Fill a container with water and suddenly spot the TV remote.
Someone left it on the kitchen table.

I realize that tonight when we go to watch TV,
I’ll be looking for the remote,
But I won’t remember that it’s on the kitchen table,
So I decide to put it back in the den where it belongs,
But first I’ll water the flowers.

I pour some water in the flowers,
But quite a bit of it spills on the floor.

So, I set the remote back on the table,
Get some towels and wipe up the spill.

Then, I head down the hall trying to
Remember what I was planning to do.

At the end of the day:
The car isn’t washed,
The bills aren’t paid,
There is a warm can of
Pepsi sitting on the counter,
The flowers don’t have enough water,
There is still only 1 cheque in my cheque book,
I can’t find the remote,
I can’t find my glasses,
And I don’t remember what I did with the car keys.
Then, when I try to figure out why nothing got done today,
I’m really baffled because I know I was busy all day,
And I’m really tired.

I realize this is a serious problem,
And I’ll try to get some help for it, but first I’ll check my e-mail….

Do me a favor.
Forward this message to everyone you know,
Because I don’t remember who I’ve sent it to.

Don’t laugh — if this isn’t you yet, your day is coming!
P.S. I don’t remember who sent it to me, so if it was you, I’m sorry

~Steve~                                    H/T Hujonwi

Outrage as ‘Dr. Death’ offers euthanasia tours of ‘inspiring’ Auschwitz

The evil doctor...

The evil doctor…

DailyMail: A controversial doctor who practices euthanasia has sparked outrage by organizing a tour to Auschwitz because he says the Nazi death damp is “inspiring”.

Belgian doctor Wim Distelmans, who has been dubbed “Dr. Death” for administering lethal injections, claims the visit will “clarify confusion” about dying as well as addressing the issue of euthanasia.

But Jewish and anti-euthanasia campaigners have reacted with horror, saying the trip, billed as a study tour, is “offensive and shocking”.

Labour MP Sir Gerald Kaufman said: “To make the notorious Nazi concentration camp of Auschwitz the centre for a congenial study-trip is preposterous, if not obscene.”

“Whatever one’s views on euthanasia – and I am against it – it is abominable to describe Auschwitz as an “inspiring venue”. What went on at Auschwitz and the other death camps was mass murder of innocents – children, women, and men.”

Dr. Distelmans, who coordinates legalized killings from his Brussels clinic, has circulated a brochure advertising the three-day tour, including visits to the Auschwitz gas chambers and a “seminar” on issues including euthanasia, which is legal in Belgium.

sick2

He said in the leaflet that Auschwitz, in Poland, where a million people were put to death, was “the pre-eminent symbol of a degrading end of life”. He added: “This site is an inspiring venue for organizing a seminar and reflecting on these issue so that we can consider and clarify confusions.”

The row coincides with controversy over attempts by the Labour peer and former Chancellor Lord Falconer to legalize assisted suicide in Britain, which critics say could prove a “slippery slope” towards widespread killing of the sick.

Under Lord Falconer’s Bill, which receives it second reading in the Lords on Friday, doctors would be able to prescribe terminally ill patients a lethal dose of drugs, but the patient would have to take the drugs themselves.

Belgium has gone a step further by allowing doctors to legally administer a fatal dose. Dr. Distelmans, 60, gained notoriety after he was shown on TV ending the life of Nathan Verhelst, 44, a transsexual who asked to die after doctors botched his sex change surgery. Last year, he performed the world’s first double euthanasia for deaf twin brothers after they learned that they were going blind.

According to a leaflet advertising the tour, the visit to Auschwitz will take place on October 9, and will include a “scientific programme”, details of which are not yet finalized.

sick3

It says they will be accompanied by documentary make Lydia Chagoll, who was imprisoned in a Japanese camp during the Second World War, and participate in a “symposium”.

However, a spokesman for Auschwitz said the group was only booked in for a routine tour led by official guides who will relate the history of the camp and show them the key  areas including the gas chambers.

The group will also visit Birkenau to see where Jews were herded off the transportation trains and selected to go straight to the gas chamber or to become prisoners.

Liberal democrat peer Lord Carlile, the son of Polish Jewish immigrants, said: “This is shocking. It will cause offence to a lot of people throughout Europe, whichever side of the argument they are on. I am all in favour of people going to Auschwitz to find out the oppression that happened there, but to describe it as an inspiring setting suggests he is either mad, stupid, or incompetent.”

Anti-euthanasia campaigner Baroness Grey-Thompson, the British Paralympian, said: “To describe Auschwitz as ‘inspiring’ is very upsetting and very disturbing. It is appalling.”

Dr. Distelmans was unavailable for comment, but he earlier told the Jewish Chronicle he had been shocked by criticisms.  He was quoted as saying: “Firstly, this is not a symposium about euthanasia. It’s a study trip focusing on human rights, suffering, and palliative care. We will mention euthanasia, but that is not the main goal of the trip. The participants are all professionals working in palliative care. They work every day with patients who suffer pain and death.”

Our main goal is to visit the death camp where all these atrocities took place. Secondly, many of the participants were not in favour of a law on euthanasia, but changed their mind after the law came into action.”

“There is obviously no link between euthanasia in Belgium and what happened in Auschwitz. The Nazis used the term ‘euthanasia’ wrongly.”

See also:

DCG

Illegals bring pneumonia and swine flu to Calif-Texas Navy bases

Bill Gertz reports for the Washington Free Beacon, July 14, 2014, that health authorities at a Navy base in Southern California took steps last weekend to curtail an outbreak of pneumonia and swine flu among illegal immigrant children housed at the facility, according to U.S. officials.

Both diseases are contagious. According to the CDC, pneumonia is caused by bacteria or viruses and can be severe. The H1N1 virus is considered less dangerous and has been detected in the United States since the 2009 pandemic. The swine flu virus jumped from pigs to humans and can be fatal in some cases.

The outbreak of disease among several of the nearly 600 immigrant children at the Naval Base Ventura County, located north of Los Angeles, initially was thought to be caused by deadly bacterial streptococcal meningitis, according to one official close to the issue.

Naval Base Ventura CountyNaval Base Ventura County

The pneumonia cases and meningitis scare last weekend followed two cases of H1N1 swine flu among other child immigrants—one at the California base and another in Texas. The virus caused a global pandemic in 2009, but officials said it is considered less dangerous than the meningitis outbreak that began over the past weekend.

Naval officials, along with HHS and Centers for Disease Control (CDC) officials, sought to block the disease outbreak by quarantines and halting transfers of children into and out of the facility. The sick children were moved to local hospitals where they are being treated.

The swine flu case, discovered late last week, involved a 16-year-old Salvadoran boy who, like others at the facility, had been transferred recently from Nogales, Ariz. A U.S. official said that in addition to the Salvadoran youth treated for swine flu, another case of swine flu was detected in June at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. More than 1,000 immigrant children are being held at Lackland.

Overall Aerial View of Lackland Air Force Base San AntonioLackland Air Force Base

HHS spokesman Kenneth J. Wolfe said the illnesses “likely pose little or no risk to the general public,” and insisted that the “arriving children” youths illegally crossing the border have been screened at U.S. border stations for health problems and given medical treatment if needed. Those “children” illegals sent to Pentagon locations had been given childhood vaccinations three days prior to entering Defense Department facilities.

Wolfe said,“If it is determined that children have certain communicable diseases or have been exposed to such communicable diseases, they are placed in a program or facility that has the capacity to quarantine. Children with serious health conditions are treated at local hospitals.” The cost of this care is “fully paid” by the federal government TAX PAYERS.

Other immigrant children are being held at bases in Texas and Oklahoma. The current plan calls for releasing the “immigrant children” illegal youths to relatives prior to their court proceedings on illegal immigration charges.

It appears the flood of illegal immigrants is based on beliefs among those in the region that they can gain entry using a two-step process—first sending thousands of children on a dangerous migration northward into the United States, and then later anticipating that the U.S. government will grant entry to some or the rest of their families in a humanitarian gesture.

Obama has not dealt directly with the crisis. During a recent visit to Denver, the president was photographed drinking beer and playing pool while declining to visit the border or facilities where the children are being held in crowded, refugee-camp-like conditions.

The White House instead has asked Congress to approve $3.7 billion for dealing with the crisis. Both the House and Senate have balked at providing the funding during a time of fiscal austerity.

The thousands of immigrants currently are caught up in a government bureaucratic legal system that is delaying rapid deportation back to their home countries. Critics of the delay say the illegals should be flown back without delay to their home countries, which include Guatemala and El Salvador, on military transport aircraft.

Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R.) said on CBS’ “Face the Nation” on Sunday that the president is ultimately responsible for the border crisis. Perry said he alerted the president in May 2012 to the flood of alien children who were traveling north on trains “and we laid out exactly what we felt was going to happen if we didn’t address that. And now we’re seeing that become reality, with literally tens of thousands of these young children making this long, arduous, very dangerous trip, being separated from their parents. And it could have been stopped years ago had the administration listened.”

H/t California Political Review

See also:

UPDATE (July 18, 2014):

The MSM finally are reporting on this.

On July 17, ABC News reports that the federal government is so overwhelmed by the current tide of migrants crossing the border it can’t provide basic medical screening to all of the illegals aliens before transporting them – often by air – to longer-term holding facilities across the country.

Translated into plain English, that means Americans who travel by air or bus are being exposed to the diseases carried by the illegals, including CONTAGIOUS diseases like TB, measles, and chicken pox.

~Eowyn

Calling on FOTM’s army of prayer warriors

light in darkness

An important member of our Fellowship of the Minds needs our prayers.

He is Wild Bill Alaska, a military veteran and faithful Christian, familiar to all of you as the man whom I hat-tip (h/t) for so many of the joke posts on FOTM.

I just received an email from him, informing me that last month he was diagnosed with terminal cancer. The oncologist gives him 2 to 10 months, depending on whether he gets chemo and radiation therapy.

Bill is leaving that decision to our lord, Jesus the Christ.

comfort

Here’s my prayer for our beloved Bill:

Psalm 71:1-3, 5-6, 8-9, 12, 14, 17-18, 20

In you, Lord, I take refuge;
let me never be put to shame.
In your justice rescue and deliver me;
listen to me and save me!
Be my rock of refuge,
my stronghold to give me safety;
for you are my rock and fortress….
You are my hope, Lord;
my trust, God, from my youth.
On you I have depended since birth;
from my mother’s womb you are my strength;
my hope in you never wavers….
My mouth shall be filled with your praise,
shall sing your glory every day.

Do not cast me aside in my old age;
as my strength fails, do not forsake me.
God, be not far from me;
my God, hasten to help me….
I will always hope in you
and add to all your praise….

God, you have taught me from my youth;
to this day I proclaim your wondrous deeds.
Now that I am old and gray,
do not forsake me, God….
Whatever bitter afflictions you sent me,
you would turn and revive me.
From the watery depths of the earth
once more raise me up.

~Eowyn

World Health Organization: HIV “exploding” among homosexual men

HIV HIV or human immunodeficiency virus is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS. Unlike some other viruses, the human body cannot get rid of HIV. That means that once you have HIV, you have it for life.

The virus is spread through body fluids such as blood, semen (cum), vaginal fluids, and breast milk. In the United States, HIV is most commonly passed from one person to another through unprotected anal or vaginal sex and through sharing needles or other drug equipment.

Great strides in tackling HIV/AIDS have been made across the world, with the number of new infections plunging by a third between 2001 and 2012, when 2.3 million people contracted the virus.

But the AFP reports that on July 11, 2014, the UN health agency World Health Organization (WHO) warned that HIV infections are rising among homosexual men in many parts of the world.

Gottfried Hirnschall, who heads WHO’s HIV department, calls the rise “exploding.” Infection rates are rising again among men who have sex with men – the group at the epicentre of AIDS pandemic when it first emerged 33 years ago, he told reporters in Geneva. A younger generation that has grown up among new treatments that make it possible to live with HIV are less focused on the disease. Today, this group is 19 times more likely than the general population to be infected by HIV. In Bangkok for instance, the incidence of HIV among men who have sex with men stands at 5.7%, compared to less than 1% for the overall population.

In its new recommendations for combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic, published on July 11, for the first time WHO “strongly recommends men who have sex with men consider taking antiretroviral medicines as an additional method of preventing HIV infection”.

US authorities made the same recommendation in May.

Taking pre-exposure prophylaxis medication, for instance as a single daily pill combining two antiretrovirals, in addition to using condoms, has been estimated to cut HIV incidence among such men by 20-25%, which means up to one million new infections among sodomites over 10 years can be averted.

The new guidelines also apply to other high-risk groups, such as transgender people, prisoners, people who inject drugs, and sex workers. Together with male homosexuals, these high-risk groups  account for about half of all new HIV infections worldwide.

Globally, transgender women and injecting drug users are around 50 times more likely than the general population to contract HIV, while sex workers have a 14-fold higher chance of getting infected, according to WHO.

Hirnschall said “Progress is however uneven” and warned that failing to address the still sky-high HIV incidence among certain groups was putting the overall battle against the deadly disease at risk.

Promoting condom use, wide-spread voluntary HIV testing, treating at-risk individuals with antiretrovirals, voluntary male circumcision and needle exchange programs are among WHO’s recommendations for battling the disease.

HIV symptoms

I notice abstinence, the virtues of prudence and of honesty (informing your sex partner you are infected) are not among WHO’s recommendations. [Snark]

In fact, on page 3 of the International Planned Parenthood Federation’s (IPPF) guide for young people living with HIV, “Healthy, Happy and Hot,” the IPPF actually says that those with HIV have “the right” to not disclose their HIV status to their sex partners!

It appears that like the IPPF, the be-all and end-all of WHO is an active sex life — “Do As Thou Wilt” — which is the central principle of the Church of Satan.

See also:

~Eowyn

U.S. running out of more and more prescription drugs

drug shortages box and pillKatherine Eban, “Drug Shortages: The Scary Reality of a World Without Meds,” Reader’s Digest Magazine, June 2014:

Jennifer LaCognata, 40, a booking agent for United Airlines from Safety Harbor, Florida, first suffered an attack of night blindness in early 2011. It took months to properly diagnose her. She was vitamin A deficient, due to a shortened bowel that made her body unable to absorb fat. The good news: The problem was totally fixable with injections of a basic medicine called Aquasol A, made by Hospira, an American generic drug company.

But bad news quickly followed. LaCognata learned that manufacturing challenges had forced Hospira to stop selling the drug, effectively plunging the entire world into a shortage. Without Aquasol A, LaCognata is going blind. United Airlines placed her on unpaid medical leave because she could no longer look at a computer screen. She is forced to wear an eye patch and can see only kaleidoscopic fragments out of one eye. “My kids call me Pirate now,” she says, “instead of Mom.”

LaCognata and her husband canvassed the world for Aquasol A. They contacted the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the State Department, and every major eye hospital in America. (They found two vials, but they were expired, so hospitals wouldn’t release them.) The couple wrote and called hospitals and organizations in Israel, China, Canada, and Brazil. LaCognata contacted charities, including the Red Cross and the Helen Keller Foundation, that serve foreign populations prone to vitamin A deficiency, without luck.

A Hospira spokesperson said that the company recognized the “critical need” for Aquasol A and had contracted with a separate manufacturing company to “accelerate the product’s return to market.” But years later, the company has yet to resume its production.

It is listed on Hospira’s website as “out of stock.”

“I can’t believe this could happen in America,” LaCognata says.

A Shocking Epidemic

It seems unfathomable in our high-tech medical system, but in 2007, 154 drugs were in shortage, a number that almost tripled to 456 in 2012, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office.

Threatening medical-care options and patients’ lives, drug shortages have occurred in almost every pharmaceutical category. Antibiotics, cancer drugs, anesthesia, pain control, reproductive and gynecological drugs, cardiac medicine, psychiatric drugs, and intravenous-feeding solutions have all been in varying degrees of short supply or not available at all. Recently, nitroglycerin, an emergency room staple used to treat heart attack patients, has been in such severe scarcity that its sole U.S. manufacturer has restricted hospitals to 40 percent of their usual orders. A study published this March in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings attributed more than 15 documented deaths since 2010 to either lack of treatment or the switch to an inferior drug as a result of medication shortages.

Though the FDA has scrambled to alleviate the crisis and physicians have become deft at juggling or substituting treatments, there is no comprehensive solution to this drug-supply breakdown, which has persisted for a complex array of reasons.

The first is all about money. As generic drug prices have dropped, so have manufacturers’ profits. As a result, some manufacturers have failed to invest in infrastructure and quality control. To ensure safety, the FDA has taken regulatory actions that have halted supplies, with sterile injectable drugs, such as pain meds and chemotherapy, dominating the shortage list. (These are the most complex and costly generics to make.) The business model of just-in-time manufacturing—in which companies make drugs as patients need them but do not stockpile extra—leaves no margin for unexpected events.

Noting that there are no shortages of big profit-generators, like Viagra, many practitioners and patients suspect less-than-honorable motives by drugmakers. Some experts suggest that manufacturers may have financial incentive to temporarily stop production of a drug. Medicare reform imposed certain price controls on generic drugs, but, due to a loophole, these controls are lifted if a manufacturer stops making the drug for six months.

Limited manufacturing capacity is an important factor too. Over half the drugs on the FDA shortage list had only one or two manufacturers, according to a report by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. Some blame hospital buying groups, middlemen that purchase drugs and supplies for many of the nation’s hospitals, which have awarded contracts to some manufacturers and not others, thereby suppressing competition and innovation. The result is that for any given drug, there may be only one or two generic manufacturers left to produce it, which can lead to shortages.

Predatory middlemen are making the situation even worse. A congressional investigation led by Rep. Elijah Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, has found that shady secondary wholesalers buy up drugs in shortage and resell them, often at exorbitant prices. This explains, in part, the haphazard ebb and flow of the shortages that makes them particularly hard to handle: One day the medicine is just gone, but there’s plenty the next.

But as experts debate the cause of the shortages, there is no disagreement over their devastating impact. They’ve turned pharmacists into professional beggars and have forced doctors to change treatment protocols on the fly—in some cases, turning routine care into a roll of the dice. They’ve stopped clinical trials and have led to the suspension of the death penalty in some states that use lethal injection.

Shortages are leading hospitals and patients to get drugs from less regulated and potentially less safe sources, such as drug compounders, specialty pharmacies that mix medications for individual patients. Some compounding pharmacies, which are not subject to regulation as stringent as that for drug manufacturers, have taken advantage of this and started churning out large volumes of drugs. But this can lead to safety issues. Such dangers became vividly clear in 2012, after contaminated steroids from the New England Compounding Center led to an outbreak of meningitis that killed 64 patients. A 2013 report by the Health and Human Services inspector general found that drug shortages have led 68 percent of U.S. hospitals to turn to compounders to make versions of medicine in short supply.

Patients today have to cope not only with being sick or choosing between treatment options but also with the possibility that the drug they need may be available solely from a risky source—or not at all.drug shortages by yearA Scary Reality for Cancer Patients

Those with life-threatening diseases have been hit hardest by shortages, in part because many of their medications have no substitute and their exacting treatment regimens cannot be delayed.

Justine Zirbes, 33, a TV producer in Minneapolis, was seven months pregnant with twins in October 2010 when she learned that her three-year-old, Axel, had leukemia. The distressing news sent her into early labor, and she was confined to bed.

As her son embarked on grueling chemotherapy for a disease that can often be cured if treated—but is almost certainly fatal if not—Zirbes learned that a national shortage of the chemotherapy drug cytarabine would affect his regimen. Doctors offered a drug called clofarabine, which was not standard treatment. Though still pregnant and on bed rest, Zirbes flatly refused. “How is this possible, in this country in 2011, that these lifesaving drugs are not widely available?” Zirbes recalls. “I was beside myself with disbelief.”

Zirbes was justified in her concern. According to a 2012 study in the New England Journal of Medicine, drug substitutions due to shortages led to higher relapse rates among children with an otherwise curable form of lymphoma.

Like Jennifer LaCognata, Zirbes embarked on a quest to find the right medicine. She contacted her senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), who took up the cause with proposed legislation. Zirbes produced two news segments on children affected by drug shortages. She worked every connection she had and looked as far away as Europe to find her son’s drug. Ultimately, the day before Axel was due for treatment, the hospital got enough cytarabine to treat him and another child.

Axel was reasonably lucky. Other patients, like Carey Fitzmaurice of Bethesda, Maryland, almost certainly suffered recurrence of their cancer because of drug shortages.

In 2006, Fitzmaurice, 37, was happily married with two young children and a job she loved as a policy analyst at the Environmental Protection Agency, when she learned that she had ovarian cancer and a BRCA1 genetic mutation that had likely caused it.

Over five years, she bravely underwent debilitating treatment, a recurrence of her ovarian cancer, an additional diagnosis of breast cancer, and a radical mastectomy. In the middle of 2011, things finally seemed to be breaking her way. Her breast cancer was in remission, and a chemotherapy drug called Doxil, made by a contractor for the Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Janssen, Inc., appeared to be vanquishing a recurrence of the ovarian cancer. But in August 2011, she learned there was not enough Doxil to complete her treatment.

Fitzmaurice assumed that she would be able to find some on her own. “I work for the federal government,” she says. “A lot of what I do is help people cut through red tape and find solutions. That’s how I tackled cancer to begin with: find out who the right doctor is, where to get surgery.”

But the shortage of Doxil thwarted her every effort. After four months without the medication, her ovarian cancer returned.

In a recent study from the University of Pennsylvania presented at the 2013 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 83 percent of oncologists and hematologists said they’ve faced cancer drug shortages, and of those, nearly all said their patients’ treatment had been affected by drug shortages.

At the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center in Columbus, Ohio, Ryan Forrey, associate director for pharmacy and infusion services, says that in 2012, of the 60,000 doses of chemotherapy administered intravenously at his facility, almost 35 percent were affected by shortages. Treatment was interrupted or canceled, patients were switched to alternative drugs, or an alternative supply for the needed drug had to be found. His overwhelmed staff “was forced to beg, borrow, plead to get drugs for patients,” he says.

Now, whenever a patient begins chemotherapy, Forrey’s hospital sequesters the entire treatment regimen, which can be months of medication, to ensure that it is available. But Forrey is not optimistic that the drug shortages will ease.

“Every time I think it can’t get worse, it does get worse,” he says.

drug shortages five drug classesAre Drug Shortages a New Normal?

Shortages are not limited to drugs for cancer or uncommon diseases. Experts fear that scarcity of the heart attack drug nitroglycerin is endangering patients’ lives. Last spring, the most basic of antibiotics, doxycycline, used for everything from acne to Lyme disease, disappeared from pharmacies. Even intravenous saline solution, a hospital staple, has been in short supply, leading some hospitals to ration their use. In fact, almost every U.S. hospital has faced a lack of basic medicine, found an American Hospital Association survey. Many have even hired a full-time staff person specifically to navigate shortages.

Hospitals have developed complex formulas to help ration existing drug supplies—essentially, to determine which patients get medication and which don’t.

“No doctor wants to prioritize,” says Richard Schilsky, MD, chief medical officer of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. “But if you have five patients and only three vials, that’s a very real problem.”

A significant shortage creep is affecting mainstays of reproductive and sexual-health medicine, from anesthetics used in gynecologic surgery to antinausea drugs for pregnancy to antibiotics for sexually transmitted diseases, says Michele Curtis, MD, an ob-gyn in Houston. “I work in the most expensive health-care system in the world, and I am being asked to do it in third world conditions,” she says.

Thirty-seven of the 38 different components used in intravenous nutrition bags have been in fluctuating shortage since spring 2009, which is a serious threat to our country’s youngest and most fragile children. Insufficient zinc, for example, has led to raw blistering sores on the tiny hands of premature infants.

“We have been compromising what we feel is optimal care for close to three years now, and we don’t really see any end in sight,” says Jay M. Mirtallo, immediate past president of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

Rolling the Dice

Doctors, patients, and regulators have jury-rigged fixes with their own hazards, using drugs that may have worse side effects or less favorable outcomes or come from unsavory wholesalers or less regulated drugmakers.

The shortages have forced Susan Agrawal, in Chicago, to make difficult decisions as she struggles to keep her nine-year-old daughter, Karuna, alive. Karuna was born with cerebral palsy due to a ruptured umbilical cord. She has since developed an autoimmune disease that causes her organs to fail. She survives by getting her nutrients intravenously and needs bags of liquid nutrition with 14 components, which Agrawal gets from a specialized sterile infusion facility.

Agrawal has had to canvass local pharmacies and drug compounders to find the ingredients that the facility can’t get. In fact, she’s even purchased drug components from a compounding pharmacy that has had repeated run-ins with state regulators for unsanitary conditions. Then she must reconstitute the components, from powder to liquid, at her dining room table, with no guarantee of sterility, and add them to her daughter’s IV bags. “It’s like, ‘Cross your fingers,’ ” she says.

Although Karuna is very sick, the fact that her IV nutrition—which shouldn’t be this complicated—is so fraught may be compromising the quality of life she has left. Agrawal fears that given her daughter’s fragile health and immune system, the shortages “will surely cause her death.”

In a survey of 1,800 health-care practitioners, about 25 percent reported errors due to shortages. Among the 1,000 incidents: a patient who died from an infection that could have been treated had the antibiotic amikacin been available, accidental overdoses of alternative drugs, and prolonged hospitalizations due to side effects from alternative drugs.

A medicine substitution sickened Sharon Brown, who was being treated for stage 2 breast cancer at Ohio State University. She was suffering relatively few side effects from her chemotherapy drug, Taxol, but then in June 2011, her doctors were unable to procure her next dose and switched her to a similar drug, Taxotere.

Two days after her first dose, she suffered a devastating reaction, an uncommon but known side effect: She grew dizzy, broke into a cold sweat, and could not lift her arms over her head. She was so dehydrated that hospital staff could not even draw blood from her veins. For the next two weeks, she needed IV fluids every other day just to treat her dehydration. She was too sick to resume chemotherapy for another month.

Even the FDA has been boxed into a corner. After the cancer drug Doxil became unavailable in late 2011, the FDA made an emergency provision to allow an Indian generic-drug company, Sun Pharma Global, to temporarily export a similar generic drug, Lipodox, which is not approved in the United States. Although patients and doctors applauded the move, Sun Pharma has faced repeated past FDA sanctions for poor quality. (In 2009, U.S. marshals raided its U.S. manufacturing plant and shut down production.)

Patients say that drugmakers have forced them into unacceptable treatment. Sufferers of Fabry disease, a rare life-threatening enzyme disorder that dangerously slows blood supply, have only the drug Fabrazyme, made by the company Genzyme, to treat their disease. But in 2009, Genzyme was forced to shut down its manufacturing plant in Allston, Massachusetts, after a viral contamination was discovered.

As Genzyme entered into a consent decree with the FDA and struggled to open a new plant, it established a rationing program. Patients would be required to take a reduced dose instead of their whole dose. If they refused, they would be given no medicine and placed at the bottom of the waiting list. A spokesperson for Genzyme says the company imposed this condition after it consulted with a working group that included doctors and patient advocates. However, patients say that the FDA did not study the impact of the diminished dose, and—more shocking—the European Medicines Agency, Europe’s main drug regulator, found that a reduced dose accelerated disease in some patients. (Genzyme spokeswoman Lori Gorski says that during the shortage, the FDA did permit patients to take an alternative drug, Replagal, made by Shire.)

In February 2012, a Pittsburgh patent lawyer, Allen Black, PhD, who had worked as a drug developer, filed a lawsuit against the FDA on behalf of patients affected by drug shortages. Those included patients with Fabry disease as well as Jennifer LaCognata, who needs Aquasol A. The lawsuit alleged that by allowing drug companies to stop making a drug, the FDA effectively allows them to make life-or-death decisions for patients. As Black says, “There’s no appeals process. You get denied a drug? Tough.” The FDA’s response offered little comfort to patients expecting help. In a motion to dismiss the lawsuit, the FDA stated that while it “works with manufacturers to help prevent and mitigate these shortages, the FDA’s authority to address potential and actual drug shortages is limited.” Last November, the court dismissed the case.

For Real Solutions, We Need Big Reform

In July 2012, Congress passed the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, which included provisions originally spearheaded by Justine Zirbes’s senator Amy Klobuchar. The law requires that drugmakers give the FDA early notification of any manufacturing issues or business decisions that may lead to shortages. It requires the FDA to expedite inspections and reviews of manufacturing sites that could help resolve shortages.

There is some evidence that the FDA has been successful in holding back the tide. In 2013, the number of new drugs added to the shortage list was far less than the number added in 2012. But in the first quarter of 2014, active shortages remained close to the highest level ever. The situation, which was the subject of a congressional hearing in February, remains “very critical,” says Erin Fox, director of the University of Utah’s drug information service.

Critics say the FDA’s response is mere window dressing that has done little to change underlying problems. “It’s fine to say that the FDA should have six months’ advance notice,” says Dr. Schilsky. But he views the new legislation as “doing nothing to address the root causes” of the problem.

Meanwhile, doctors and patients have little information about when they can expect shortages to be resolved. Despite planning and promises from drugmakers, “many resolution dates are unknown or unmet,” says Ryan Roux, chief pharmacy officer at the Harris County Hospital District in Texas.

Companies aren’t penalized for drug shortages or incentivized to avoid them, experts say. The only real solution, say a number of health-care professionals, is to require drug manufacturers to stockpile medicine and to ensure that more than one drugmaker produces it. “There needs to be a way to obligate multiple manufacturers to make these lifesaving medications,” says Ohio State’s Forrey.

The FDA would have to require that manufacturers change their just-in-time manufacturing model and set aside reserves of lifesaving drugs, which the FDA has claimed is impossible. But one executive at a pharmacy benefit-management company, who asked to remain anonymous, says the FDA could easily mandate this: “Don’t give me this stuff: ‘We can’t tell the drug companies what to do,’” he says. “Yes, you can; you do it all the time.” The FDA, with all its leverage, “could probably solve 90 percent of the problem.”

Some vital industries, such as technology and defense, encourage what is called second sourcing, in which manufacturers may sublease at least one fifth of production to backup companies to avoid supply-chain disruptions in the event of natural or other disasters. Justine Zirbes, who faced the prospect that her son Axel could have died from leukemia without cytarabine, says that manufacturers who “stop making a lifesaving drug” should be subject to criminal prosecution.

In a separate proceeding, Jennifer LaCognata sued Hospira on the grounds that the company failed to plan for contingencies in its shortage of Aquasol A. Last June, Florida’s 11th Circuit Court of Appeals dismissed the suit. Her lawyer, Allen Black, then petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court, which declined to take the case. LaCognata, whose vision continues to deteriorate and who lost her house in a foreclosure proceeding, says she has to remain strong for her kids. “I have to have a very upbeat attitude,” she says, “or it would just consume [me].”

Just recently, her lawyer was staggered to learn from a friend who works for Doctors Without Borders that a version of the vitamin A drug that LaCognata needs is being manufactured in France, sold under the name Nepalm Vitamin A. But with her financial resources depleted, her doctor reluctant to prescribe it, and her need to get a compassionate-use exemption from the FDA (so the drug can get through customs), LaCognata just has to figure out how to obtain it.

Couple Of Great Vids. Black Patriots Waking Up At Border.

Skippy, The jig is up. Your base has started to see their future. And It’s not so bright after all.  sangry_group_100-100

 

Houston black woman goes on EPIC rant about unaccompanied illegals – “Why can’t they go back?”

Bernadette Lancelin is very upset that the unaccompanied minors flooding across the border aren’t being sent back home. Instead they are being put in detention centers around the country. Lancelin is out with the local news in Houston because a closed middle school that hasn’t been used in years is now on the list to become another detention center. And she, among others, is furious about it.

Watch:

It’s not right. Now billions of dollars want to be borrowed from the White House to help feed and house them.

What about the kids here? In our neighborhood? In our country? Not just in this neighborhood but in our country.

All these kids? Really? Why can’t they go back?

I’m sorry that their parents are in poor living conditions or surroundings or whatever’s going on out there. I don’t care.

I care about what’s going on right here in my own back yard, my neighborhood.

Am i the only one in this community that’s out here that watches the news this morning. Oh, my god! I feel alone right now this this, and I’m very saddened by it.

http://therightscoop.com/houston-black-woman-goes-on-epic-rant-about-unaccompanied-illegals-why-cant-they-go-back/

And then we have

BLACK PROTESTERS in Murrieta Confront Pro-Illegal Immigrant Supporters

Posted by Jim Hoft on Monday, July 7, 2014, 12:39 PM

A group of black Americans spoke out in support of protecting women and children in America BEFORE worrying about the rest of the world. This occurred at the Murrieta California Border Patrol Station on July 4th, 2014.

The young man pictured below said this:

“If somebody brought six children to your house and you ain’t got no job, are you going to take them in?… Are you going to try to find out where they came from? Are you going to try to send them back?… What are we going to do for the people who are here who are starving already?Why would we add to the problem?”

Black Patriots

Black Patriots

The woman below added:

“It’s just too much. We already got starvation, kids walking without with no shoes. We are already taking that on in America. We don’t need other people’s kids to bring more problems.”

Female Patriot

Female Patriot

The debate starts around the 1:40 mark in the video when the black Americans confronted the illegal immigrant protesters.

“What are we going to do for the people who are here who are starving already?”

(Raw News Video Unedited – Warning on language)

~Steve~

http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2014/07/must-see-video-black-americans-confront-pro-illegal-immigrant-supporters-in-murrieta/