Category Archives: Education

UK Equips 10 Year Olds With Birth Control

What starts in the UK, ends up in the US. Sadly, all this is promoted by our government schools which teach the children every form of sex there is, including bestiality. Yes, even sex with animals has been taught in American schools. The state of Maine is the culprit on that one. In the 60s, our health classes were about hygiene and reproduction, but not outside marriage and not co-ed. Today, everything is taught, including homosexual sex to children as young as five.

And what are we doing to their bodies?  Age 10 is far too young to have a birth control substance in their little undeveloped bodies.  As an aside, it’s been documented that spaying or neutering dogs before age two makes them much more likely to develop immune system problems like diabetes, Cushings Disease, and various other abnormalities. Early fixing of animals does not allow the hormones to properly feed the body until adulthood.  It’s just the opposite with young girls.  They are feeding these youngsters hormones their bodies don’t need and won’t need for decades, and the health risks down the road are looking very ominous.

I cannot imagine what these little ones think, but their brains are programmed from an early age and then is it any wonder we have so many out-of-wedlock pregnancies and abortions on young girls…some of them so young you have to wonder what kind of parents were in charge.

Again, what starts in the UK ends up in the US, and this too is population control, a la UN Agenda 21, along with the destruction of our culture and mores.

Kelleigh

Here’s the story from One News Now

While organizations such as the United Nations promote sexual options for children in Europe and the U.K., many Third World countries oppose having those values forced on them.

In the United Kingdom, girls as young as ten years old are being injected with long-term contraceptive implants at the expense of taxpayers. Brian Clowes of Human Life International [says that] while the health impact on little girls isn’t known, manufacturers do list side effects for adults.

sex education

“You can see a list of more than 50 major side effects,” he says. “Everything from deep vein thrombosis, blood clots, death, growing hair all over the body, and so on. I just find it ridiculous. We’re against steroid use in sports but we’re willing to pump our little ten-year-old girls full of steroids like this.

The United Nations and groups associated with it are pushing the agenda even further.

erotic ed

“They’re [essentially] saying Kids have the right to sex education, and if we’re going to educate them about sex, of course then we have to give them condoms, we have to give them birth control without their parents knowing about it,'” he remarks. “And then they turn around and say But this won’t increase sexual behavior. And that is as stupid as saying we will give kids the keys to the car, but it won’t increase driving behavior.”

The program has been spread throughout much of Europe and also into Third World countries, where moral values are much more in line with the Bible than in Europe and the United States. Clowes says many of those countries are tired of having conflicting sexual and moral values pushed on them.

All-women’s school lets students choose between 10 different pronouns

So many choices...

So many choices…

 

Campus Reform: Scripps College students will now be able to choose between 10 different pronouns in their class portal so professors may address them based on their preferred pronoun.

The school notified the students of the change via a campus-wide email in the middle of February explaining the decision and the new options for gender identity that will be provided for both student and professors.

“This feature has been implemented in response to student recommendations and in consultation with many constituents in the Scripps community,” the email obtained by Campus Reform said. “The pronoun portal feature gives students an opportunity to inform faculty of a pronoun that most closely matches their gendered and lived experiences at Scripps. It has been made available for students and faculty in an effort to build an inclusive environment.”

The new gender identification page in the student portal will allow students to choose from the following pronouns: e/ey, em, eir/eirs, eirself/emse; he, him, his, himself; hu, hum, hus, humself; “just my name please;” none; per, per, per/pers, perself; she, her, hers, herself; they, them, their/theirs, themse; ze, hir, hir/hirs, hirself; and ze, zir, zir/zirs, zirself.

The email also included a link to a pronoun guide by Pomona College also in Claremont, Calif., to explain some of the lesser-known pronouns.

Rachel Neuberg, a sophomore at Scripps, told The Student Life, a weekly student publication encompassing the Claremont Colleges, that she believed the change is a necessary step for the college to make in creating a safer environment for students.

“One’s gender identity should not be something that causes them anxiety in their everyday lives,” Neuberg said. “I hope that Scripps will continue to create a safe and comfortable place for its students, and that other colleges will take note so we can all work together to stop institutionalized violence.”

This change in policy comes after Scripps College, an all-women’s school, started admitting men who identify as women to the college in December. Male pronouns are included in the list of preferred pronouns students may choose from.

Scripps is a liberal arts institution located in Claremont, Calif.

Emse (formerly DCG)

Parents upset over ‘personal’ survey offered at school

homeschool

Fox59.com: Some parents in Noblesville (Ind.) aren’t happy about a survey their middle schoolers filled out at school. They want to know who’s behind the optional survey that they said got way too personal.

“They crossed the line when they entered the home,” said Michelle Bracewell. Bracewell said some of the questions her seventh grade daughter answered were invasive. Her daughter took the survey on her iPad at Noblesville West Middle School.

The survey asked about drug and alcohol use, which Bracewell said was understandable, but she became bothered when she found out what other statements the survey solicited.

It asked for student responses to statements like, “People in my family have serious arguments,” and, “People in my family often insult or yell at each other.” “Those are personal questions, and if I want people to know what’s going on inside my home, I’ll let them know,” said Bracewell.

Bracewell said her child’s instructor told the class the survey was optional.

Other parents were concerned, too. Comments popped up on Facebook, with some parents saying they are very upset over an “issue of rights,” and others calling the survey “data mining, and a 100% violation of privacy and trust.”

Ruth Gassman

Ruth Gassman

“We ask these questions for purposes of public health,” said Ruth Gassman, Executive Director of the Indiana Prevention Resource Center. Gassman says 150 school corporations across the state voluntarily agree to the Indiana Youth Survey, which has been offered across the state for more than twenty years. The survey’s offered in sixth through twelfth grades, and Gassman said each school decides which grades in which they’ll distribute the survey.

The data is used to tailor drug and alcohol awareness programs, some of the questions are used to probe risk factors in the home. “These items are referred to ask risk and protective factors for alcohol, tobacco, and drug use,” said Gassman.

But this year, in a pilot program, the IPRC asked students for their birthdate and initials, still optional, but parents claim that’s an invasion of privacy, too. “It’d be very easy to go back and look at a birthdate and initials and see who the child was,” said Bracewell.

Gassman said that initial and birthdate information is not stored, instead it’s used to assign a generic numerical identification number to track students’ responses over a course of years.

A spokesperson for Noblesville Schools said the survey was made optionally available to middle school students.

FOX59 wanted to know if any teachers forced their classes to complete the survey. A spokesperson did not return our email or answer any of our follow up questions.

Click here to be directed to a sample copy of the sixth grade, and seventh through twelfth grade surveys. Rules from the IPRC state that students must be informed their participation is voluntary.

Here’s some questions from the surveys:

  • During any time in your life, has either of your parents or guardians been sent to Iraq, Afghanistan, or other combat zone because they are in the military? (Military includes Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, National Guard, and Reserves.)
  • During the past 12 months, how often have you bet/gambled for money or valuables in the following ways? Gambling can be done in a variety of settings, including with family and friends. (Some answers include bingo, March Madness and lottery.)
  • Would your parents know if you did not come home on time?
  • How often do your parents tell you they’re proud of you for something you’ve done?
  • In the past year (12 months), how many of your best friends have regularly attended religious services?
  • If a kid carried a handgun in your neighborhood, would he or she be caught by the police?

I’m surprised they didn’t ask about any firearms in the home.

DCG

University of Chicago offers $1 million for best idea to stem youth violence

black lives2

Chicago Tribune: More than suicide or heart disease, HIV or unintentional injuries, homicide has claimed the lives of more young African-American males than anything else.

In fact, it has outpaced the nine other leading causes of death combined, according to recent federal data. And Chicago has a higher percentage of young homicide victims than the national average.

In an effort to change that narrative, the University of Chicago Crime Lab has teamed up with the MacArthur Foundation and Get In Chicago to offer up to $1 million for the best idea or ideas to combat youth violence.

“This is not an intractable problem, but we have not made enough progress,” said Roseanna Ander, executive director of the University of Chicago Crime Lab and Urban Education Lab.

Organizers of the design competition said they are looking for imaginative solutions to the complex issue. The goal is to improve life outcomes of the young people who walk the city’s streets, attend its schools and play in its parks.

chicago

The deadline to submit plans is fast approaching. All letters of interest have to be in by Monday (3/2), after which a limited number of applicants will be asked to file full proposals. The awards will be announced in late May.

Plans should focus on Chicago youths ages 13 to 18. The hope, Ander said, is that researchers can use the data collected in tandem with other studies to tease out the common elements of effective programs, whether they be increasing school engagement or understanding the role of a positive adult in a young person’s life.

“We really need to have a variety of approaches that meet different sets of needs,” Ander said. “No one of them is going to be the slam-dunk, but hopefully, collectively, there will be a portfolio of strategies that can help make the quantum leap we need to make, not just in Chicago but in lots of other cities that are struggling mightily with this problem.”

The Crime Lab launched a similar challenge in 2009, which funded the community group Youth Guidance’s Becoming a Man project. President Barack Obama last year rolled out the My Brother’s Keeper initiative, which was modeled after the Chicago school-based counseling and mentoring program.

Although this year’s winning proposal could be up and running in Chicago as early as this summer, the objective is to reach beyond the city’s borders, said Maurice Classen, program officer at the MacArthur Foundation.

“If you look at (Becoming a Man), it ended up several years after the design competition in the White House,” he said. “That would be the ideal in terms of impacting anti-violence programming across the country. That would be the dream.”

So many ideas to improve the situation in Chicago. A good start is to begin with the politicians who make the laws and a society that really does believe that #blacklivesmatter.

DCG

Southern Oregon elementary school will change “harsh” consequences for tardiness

 

lunch kid

Oregon Live: Officials at Lincoln Elementary in Grants Pass say they plan to change the consequences for students who are tardy after a grandmother’s photo of her first-grade grandson stuck behind a cardboard wall in the school lunchroom prompted widespread outrage on Facebook and in phone calls to the district.

In a posting on the school’s web page, district officials wrote Thursday that their practice of separating students behind a cardboard shield during lunch “was never intended to isolate or stigmatize students.”

But that was exactly what it looked like to parents, grandparents and anyone on Facebook who saw the photo of little Hunter, dejected behind a screen as his classmates eat together at a nearby table.

Students who are chronically late to school or who miss too many days of school are in serious jeopardy of not learning to read and not graduating from high school. For that reason, good schools stress the importance of regular on-time school attendance and take steps when a student is frequently late or missing. In Oregon, the problem begins in kindergarten and is pronounced in kindergarten and first grade.

But experts and educators recognize that when 5- and 6-year-olds are late to school, it is the parent, not the child, who is doing something wrong and needs to do better.

That is exactly the point that Laura Hoover of Grants Pass made in her angry Facebook post:

His momma’s car sometimes doesn’t like to start right up. Sometimes he’s a couple minutes late to school. Yesterday, he was 1 minute late and this is what his momma discovered they do to punish him… for something that is out of this baby’s control! They make a mockery of him in front of the other students! His mom found him there, crying, and took him home for the day.

Nearly 50,000 people shared her post. Many people who send or have sent their children to Lincoln Elementary commented.

They explained that the school has an official policy, instituted by the principal,  that students who are tardy four or more times will be subject to “lunch detention.” Students are forbidden to talk during that time and are put behind a screen if they try, parents wrote.

District officials posted an extensive explanation and pledge to make changes on Lincoln Elementary’s web site:

“There has been considerable general and social media attention regarding the Lincoln Elementary School Attendance/Tardy Academic Catch-up Protocol, which is intended to help support students address learning gaps arising from chronic tardiness/absenteeism. Principal (Melissa) Fitzsimmons immediately reached out to the parents involved in order to meet, and we are looking forward to addressing their concerns regarding Lincoln’s current practice in this area. Lincoln’s current attendance support protocol was communicated to parents via newsletter and is intended to provide the students with an above average level of tardiness, supervised additional learning time in a non-distracting setting. It was never intended to isolate or stigmatize students.

The District is taking the concerns raised very seriously and are reviewing alternative approaches for Lincoln Elementary to accomplish this worthwhile objective while avoiding any chance of adversely impacting a child, which was never intended. Lincoln Elementary is a warm and caring learning community receiving Student Success Champion School recognition from the Oregon Department of Education in 2012 as an inspiring example of what is possible when teachers, administrators, parents, students, and communities come together behind a shared vision of excellence for all students.

The District is open to constructive criticism with respect to current practices which can almost always be addressed and resolved informally. Modifications are already being made to the Lincoln tardiness support protocol in order to ensure “catch-up” learning opportunities are being provided in a supportive and caring setting.  In order to minimize the disruption of Lincoln’s ongoing educational process, please submit any additional concerns or input to the District Office at info@grantspass.k12.or.us.”

A call to the school went straight to voice mail and Fitzsimmons has not yet responded to the request for comment.

Personally, I don’t  think that punishment is harsh. And if grandma is so concerned about it, maybe she should help get the baby’s momma a new car.

Then again, public school indoctrination policies are always messed up.

DCG

Public university omits race from crime alerts to protect minority students’ feelings

stupidity

Campus Reform: The University of Minnesota has discontinued using race in campus crime alerts sent to the Twin Cities community.

In an email sent to faculty, staff, and students at the U of M, President Eric W. Kaler and Vice President Pamela Wheelock said they had been made aware of the “negative impact of using race as part of the suspect descriptions” and will cease to use racial descriptions in alerts that are “too general.”

“We have heard from many in our community that the use of race in suspect descriptions in our Crime Alerts may unintentionally reinforce racist stereotypes of Black men, and other people of color, as criminals and threats,’ Kaler said in the email obtained by Campus Reform. “That in turn can create an oppressive climate for some members of our community, a climate of suspicion and hostility.”

According to the email, Kaler and Wheelock have been discussing the removal of racial descriptions from the crime alerts for more than a year—since Dec., 2013.

“As a student here, I feel that any details that can be shared with me about the suspect are important to know for my safety,” Matthew Ricker, a freshman at U of M told Campus Reform. “If the university is withholding information that can help me identify a threat to my safety, I cannot support their actions.”

In her statement, Wheelock said that while crime alerts are supposed to help people be safe, they can also impact people’s feeling of safety.

“For some, knowing they have all the information available about a crime, including the complete suspect description, makes them feel better informed and increases how safe they feel,” Wheelock said. “But others—particularly Black men—have shared that suspect descriptions negatively impact their sense of safety. They express concern that Crime Alerts that include race reinforce stereotypes of Black men as threats and create a hostile campus climate.

According to the email, racial descriptions will be included in the crime alerts only when the university thinks there is “sufficient detail that would help identify a specific individual or group.”

The email also claimed that U of M’s campus has become safer in the past 18 months as the number of robberies has decreased, and U of M faculty, staff, and students are “more aware” of campus safety measures.

pc police

DCG

Washington State spends millions on convicted teachers retirements

say what

King5.com: In Washington, public employees who commit a crime don’t lose their taxpayer guaranteed retirements, and teachers can earn the right to a lifetime retirement after working for as little as five years.

KING 5 asked the state for a list of all the teachers who have had their Washington teaching license revoked and compared that list to a list of all the public employees receiving a pension.

The state has multiple retirement plans for teachers. Two of them would be considered a traditional pension plan, the third includes a private component. KING 5 only focused on the first two.

That led to a list of 22 teachers, most who had been convicted of crimes against children, who together have received about $5.1 million above their own retirement contributions, interest included as of the end of 2014.

That’s about $236,027.95 on average per person.

The list includes people like Norman Standley, David Lloyd Anderson, William Pickerel, Ruben Carrera, Alfredo Castillo and Ande Strittmatter, who were all found guilty of child molestation, Larry Pierson who was found guilty of assault with sexual motivation, Craig Figley who is serving a life sentence for molesting children and Christopher Loftus who was convicted of child rape.

messed up

In one specific example, KING 5 looked at the records for Laurence “Shayne” Hill. Hill was convicted on multiple counts of child molestation in King County in 2005 after he admitted to molesting his 10-year-old and 11-year-old students.

By the end of last year, Hill had received about $334,471.03 from the state retirement system; just over $208,568.16 was money above and beyond what Hill contributed into his own retirement, interest included.

“What! It’s that gut reaction of, ‘Oh, my gosh!’ This person is in prison for this and they are receiving several thousand dollars a month? What?!” exclaimed Anne Marie Gurney, a researcher with the Freedom Foundation, a conservative policy group in Washington state.

Gurney contacted KING 5 with concerns about the state’s pension laws. “To a certain degree, we need to protect our taxpayers,” Gurney said.

At least 25 states, including Alaska, California, and Arizona, have pension forfeiture laws, in other words public employees and/or elected officials convicted of a crime lose at least some aspect of their taxpayer funded retirements. Washington does not have a pension forfeiture law.

“I really think that probably it has never really come to the surface,” said State Senator Barbara Bailey, R-Oak Harbor. Bailey is the chair of the Select Committee on Pension Policy.

“I would agree, you know some things are so egregious you really can’t understand how these things can happen,” Bailey said regarding teachers who have committed crimes against children and are still receiving a pension.

Bailey said she’d consider whether public employees who commit a crime should be required to forfeit a portion of their pension, for instance to help pay for incarceration costs. “I think that is only fair, and I think taxpayers would agree,” Bailey said.

Rep. Timm Ormsby, D-Spokane, said he would be open to considering some kind of pension forfeiture law for future hires, but he would want to make sure whatever penalty was imposed only negatively impacted the person who committed the crime and not his or her dependents.

“I would fight it,” said Kit Raney, President of the Washington Teacher’s Association-Retired. She represents the interests of retired teachers. “So, this is just pure noise and a non-issue as far as I’m concerned,” Raney said.

Raney said she doesn’t believe teachers should lose their pensions under any circumstance. “If a worker commits a crime, it is handled by the legal system. The trial, the conviction is part of the legal system. It is totally separate from the pension system, which they contributed to and earned throughout their career. It’s apples and oranges,” Raney said. Raney accused the Freedom Foundation of being anti-teacher and anti-pension.

Gurney said the issue is not teachers or their pensions, but creating the legal room for taxpayers to have a choice. “I think taxpayers should have a choice if they are going to fund the pension of hardened criminals,” Gurney said.

Any new legislation would be met with by lot of resistance.

For now, Senator Bailey said she’s studying her options and the earliest she would propose a bill would be next year.

DCG