Category Archives: Economy

“I’ve made myself unemployable, now pay me benefits”

star tattoos

Daily Mail: A woman who had stars tattooed on her face says she has no choice other than to claim benefits worth £14,000-a-year ($15,224 US dollars) because no one will employ her.

Kay Bennett, 33, from Swindon, says the tattoos, which were done when she was 24, have turned her into a jobless recluse. ‘Until they are removed, I won’t be able to find a job and will be stuck on benefits,’ says Miss Bennett, who resigned from her last role because she felt ‘left out’ by colleagues, and is now hoping someone will step forward and offer to pay for her to have laser removal.

‘I can’t afford to have it done but I’m absolutely desperate to get rid of them,’ says Miss Bennett, who claims she has applied for 40 jobs in the last year but without success. ‘I hope my nightmare will make anyone think twice about having such visible tattoos especially on your face, neck or hands,’ she says.

star tattoos2

‘I am well spoken but as soon as people see me they think I’m rough and common. People take one look at me, see the stars and automatically think I’m a criminal or on drugs. I’ve applied for 40 jobs in the last year alone. But as soon as I turn up for an interview I can see that person looking at the stars on my face. As soon as they see those stars, and the other tattoos on my neck and hands, their mind is made up. They are not going to employ me.’

Her handouts, which total £14,000 a year, include an employment and support allowance of £360 a fortnight and housing benefit of £400-a-month. She also gets sick money because she suffers from depression, the result, she says, of tattoo-related comfort eating that has caused her go up three dress sizes from a 12 to an 18.

star tattoos3

Another great upset is caused by being unable to find a boyfriend, which Miss Bennett says is also down to the inkings. ‘I only attract bad boys,’ she admits. ‘Nice guys don’t fancy me because of my tattoos.’

In an ironic twist, the 33-year-old, who has 18 tattoos in total, says she got her first one as a means of boosting her confidence, which had been knocked by school bullies. ‘I thought if I had tattoos I would look hard and people would think twice before picking on me,’ she explains.

Over the next six years she got further tattoos done on her arms and neck, but easily found work as a security guard. Then, aged 24, she decided to have six stars tattooed on her face – much to her parents and her employers’ horror.

It took her eight years to find another job, this time as a dog sitter. But after a few months, she resigned when other staff failed to invite her on a night out. ‘I started off working as a volunteer and people got to know me,’ explains Miss Bennett. ‘But other staff were wary of me because of how I look. I didn’t get invited out with them and I was so upset I had to resign.

Since then she has been unable to find another job and has spiralled into depression. ‘I can’t go out because I feel everyone is staring at me,’ she says. I come from a middle class family. My dad is an estimator, my sister is a social worker and my mum works in admin. [But] people judge me on my looks and rarely bother to get to know me.’

DCG

Public service in Portland pays well: Why a fired administrator earned $371,353

gravy train

Oregon Live: Portland’s former chief administrator, Jack Graham, pulled in more money than any other city employee during fiscal 2014 – and by a staggering margin. Graham, fired in November 2013 by Mayor Charlie Hales after a series of high-profile controversies, had gross earnings of $371,353.

Graham collected a year’s salary, $192,192, in severance, plus about $60,000 from cashing out vacation time. Just under $120,000 came from his base salary.

Graham tops a list of nearly 8,800 city employees who, together, earned more than $439 million between July 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014, according to a city database obtained by The Oregonian/OregonLive through the state’s public records law.

In all, Graham’s total earnings were $112,000 more than the city’s second-highest-paid employee and far more than any top official, including Hales.

Here’s a look at other findings:

1) Six figures: 943 city employees, or 10.7 percent, earned more than $100,000 from base pay, overtime, premium pay, and vacation, sick or severance payouts.

Seem high? It’s not.

Census data show that overall, 12.8 percent of Portland’s nearly 352,000 workers had inflation-adjusted earnings in the six digits, according to 2013 estimates.

2) Part-time/seasonal: The city’s numbers are heavily skewed by Portland Parks & Recreation, which lists more than 3,200 employees. Of those, nearly 2,000 are part time or seasonal recreation leaders. The highest-paid among those employees earned just under $25,000, the lowest $13.88, with average earnings of about $3,000 for the year.

Hales’ pledge to ensure that all city employees earn at least $15 an hour, incidentally, does not apply to part time or seasonal workers.

3) Politics doesn’t pay (comparatively, at least): Hales is the city’s top politician and administrator, earning a base pay of about $129,500. Yet 86 city employees earned more than Hales, a list including bureau directors, attorneys and senior-level administrators.

By including overtime, premiums and payouts, the list of employees who earned more than Hales doubles to 176. Of those, more than 60 percent work for Portland Fire & Rescue (69 employees) or the Police Bureau (36).

One year ago, when the City Council approved annual cost-of-living adjustments, Hales said he found it “nuts” that he and the city commissioners earn far less than the managers they manage. “It’s a crazy situation,” he said.

Hales at the time said he would look to form a review panel to consider pay increases for future elected officials.

4) Overtime: Portland spent $18.8 million on overtime, with nearly half of that ($8.6 million) going to employees in Portland Fire & Rescue, and an additional $5 million to the Police Bureau.

The city’s emergency responders work long, often odd hours. A typical firefighters’ schedule involves 24 hours on duty followed by 48 hours off. Union-represented firefighters work about 52 hours a week, making them eligible for about 12 hours of overtime every week.

Of about 400 city firefighters, 178 earned at least $10,000 in overtime. Of those 38 earned at least $20,000, seven of that group at least $30,000 and two of those topped $40,000.

DCG

Hillary is feeling the heat: Clinton Foundation to refile tax returns going back 15 years

Clinton Cash

It was only several days ago that news came of a new book by Peter Schweizer, Clinton Cash: The Untold Story of How and Why Foreign Governments and Businesses Helped Make Bill and Hillary Rich, on Hillary and Bill Clinton having received millions of dollars in bribes from foreign governments and individuals in exchange for favors from the State Department when Hillary was the latter’s boss as U.S. secretary of state.

But this story not only has “legs,” the publicity is already having an impact on the poisonous couple.

Today comes news that the tax-exempt “nonprofit” Clinton Foundation and the Clinton Health Access Initiative will refile their tax returns that may extend back as many as 15 years.

That’s because a Reuters investigation uncovered “errors” in tax returns filed by both outfits. In the case of the Clinton Foundation, the so-called “charity” organization is so brazen that, despite having received millions of dollars from donors, it reported it had received nothing from foreign and U.S. governments.

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz is calling on the Clinton non-profits to return all of the money they’d received from foreign governments. (Read more here.)

Thank you, Peter Schweizer!

~Éowyn

Four MSNBC Hosts Owe Tax Debts

 

msnbc

THR: Touré Neblett, co-host of MSNBC’s The Cycle, is the latest network host to be under scrutiny for owing thousands in taxes. 

According to public records reviewed by National Review, Neblett’s debt currently stands at over $59,000. A state tax warrant of $46,862.68 was issued to the host and his wife in September 2013, followed by an additional warrant for $12,849.87 six months later. Neblett formerly served as a contributor for The Dylan Ratigan Show before it was canceled by the network in 2012.

He joins three other MSNBC hosts who have also reportedly been issued tax warrants or liens, including Joy Ann-Reid, Melissa Harris-Perry and Al Sharpton.

National Review reports that the state of New York filed a tax warrant against Reid, who has been a contributor for the network since 2011, and her husband for the amount of $4,948.15 last month. Reid hosted The Reid Report for a full year — from February 2014 until its early cancelation in February 2015.

tampon earrrings

Just last week, the Winston-Salem Journal also reported that Harris-Perry, who has hosted the political commentary program Melissa Harris-Perry on MSNBC since 2012, and husband James Perry owed $70,000 in delinquent taxes ($21,721 of which was paid off on Tax Day, Harris-Perry told the newspaper).

Sharpton’s financial run-ins with the IRS surfaced back in November 2014, as reported by The New York Times. The Times estimated that Sharpton, host of political talk show PoliticsNation since 2011, and his combined businesses owed around $4.5 million in state and federal tax liens.

An MSNBC spokesperson declined to comment on the reports.

al-sharpton-obama-7-16-08

DCG

ACLU sues feds in bid to make Catholic groups provide abortion to illegal immigrants

unborn-baby2

Fox News: Providing food and shelter to illegal immigrants isn’t enough for federally-funded Catholic organizations, according to the American Civil Liberties Union, which is suing the federal government to help ensure the religious organizations provide abortion and contraception to them as well.  

The suit aims to obtain government records related to reproductive healthcare policy for unaccompanied immigrant children in the care of federally funded Catholic agencies, which do not believe in abortion.

“We have heard reports that Catholic bishops are prohibiting Catholic charities from allowing teens in their care to access critical services like contraception and abortion– even if the teenager has been raped on her journey to the United States or in a detention facility,” said ACLU staff attorney Brigitte Amiri.

Almost 60,000 unaccompanied minors illegally crossed over from Mexico border last year. Nearly a third were young girls, and Amiri claims up to 80 percent were victims of sexual assault.

The government contracts with the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) to care for those children until they can either reunite with a relative or face an immigration hearing. The organization has received $73 million overall from the government- with $10 million coming in to care for unaccompanied minors in 2013 alone.

A letter from the USCCB shows the organization strongly objecting to a regulation proposed by the Obama administration requiring contractors provide abortions to immigrants who have been raped.

“The Catholic Bishops are taking millions of dollars in federal grants- and then imposing their beliefs on this vulnerable population who they are supposed to serve… and that raises serious concerns under the separation of church and state provision in our Constitution,” said Amiri.

But the bishops are hitting back at the ACLU- maintaining they are well within their rights to exercise religious freedom while taking care of the minors.

“For decades, we have provided exemplary services to this vulnerable population without facilitating abortions, and despite ACLU’s extreme assertions to the contrary, the law not only permits our doing so, but protects it,” said Kevin Appleby, Director of the USCCB’s Office of Migration Policy and Public Affairs.

Appleby says instances in which a client under his organization’s care asks for a service contrary to the beliefs of the Church are rare. He insists the USCCB informs the government of a girl’s desire to access reproductive healthcare if the government has legal custody of that child.

“Let’s be clear about the ACLU’s purpose here: ending the productive and successful partnership between the Catholic Church and the federal government on the care and shelter of vulnerable populations. Denying us the freedom to serve betrays the very children the ACLU is purportedly attempting to help,” he told Fox News.

The ACLU is only suing for federal documents on the USCCB’s policies at the moment, but will consider further legal actions depending on what those documents indicate. The government has not yet officially responded to the ACLU’s request.

Planned Parenthood logo

Just send the illegals to Planned Parenthood; they’d be more than happy to do abortions.

DCG

Rose Blumkin: American Success Story

Rose Blumkin

The following is by Dick Kazan from his site http://www.kazantoday.com

The author is successful business, real estate, and media entrepreneur Dick Kazan.

Published on Tue Dec 13, 2005

Today, I’d like to tell you the remarkable story of Rose Blumkin, a Russian immigrant who never spent a day in school, arrived penniless and built the largest home furnishings store in the United States.

Blumkin was born to poverty in 1893. Her father was a Rabbi with little income and her mother worked long hours running a small grocery store to support the family of eight children. At the age of six, tiny Rose began working in the store to help her.

At 20, Rose married Isadore Blumkin, who was also poor. So they could have a better life, he went to the U.S. to get a start but before she could join him, World War 1 broke out and it would be three years before the couple could reunite.

In 1919, they settled in Omaha and struggled to get by. He ran a secondhand-clothing store and a pawnshop. Rose helped him with the clothing store and to supplement their modest income she used her basement to sell furniture. They learned English from their four children.

Rose knew first hand the difficult circumstances the vast number of poor and struggling people of the 1930’s endured and saw a business opportunity. Despite the Great Depression, she acted.

In 1937 Blumkin was nearly 44 years old but she borrowed $500 from her brother and opened a store in the basement of her husband’s shop. She called it the Nebraska Furniture Mart and her motto was, “Sell cheap, tell the truth, don’t cheat nobody.”

Blumkin’s business grew by offering merchandise at rock bottom prices. At times when she didn’t have enough inventory, she hauled her family’s own furniture into the store and sold it.

Her big competitors deeply resented her undercutting their prices and pressured manufacturers not to sell to her. This didn’t stop Mrs. B as she came to be called. She’d visit distant retailers and buy their excess inventories at sharply reduced prices, sometimes for pennies on the dollar.

As her store kept growing, Mrs. B, applied to the banks for credit but banks scoffed at her as an illiterate immigrant. She resented these “big shots” treating her this way as she had to operate from cash generated from selling her merchandise and from credit she got from her suppliers.

Despite this lack of liquidity, by working seven days a week, 10 hours a day, selling a high volume of furniture at very low prices, Mrs. B built her store into a success.

Something else also made it successful. Sometimes when a family needed furniture and didn’t have enough money, rather then let them leave disappointed, Mrs. B quietly cut the price for them. This was a nice thing to do but it was also wise of her because it built repeat trade as that family would return time and again and her business grew.

But in 1951 Mrs. B’s store suddenly hit the wall.

This happens to many fast growing businesses because cash may not come in quickly enough to cover the cost of a larger inventory or other expenses. Mrs. B got in a cash bind and couldn’t pay her suppliers.

Confronted with the loss of her business and all that she had worked so hard for, she took bold action. She rented Omaha’s City Auditorium, ran a massive sale, blew out $250,000 in inventory in three frantic days and paid off her suppliers.

After that, she operated strictly from cash as her store grew at a carefully measured pace into the largest home furnishings store in the United States, making her extremely successful.

Then one day in 1983, long-time customer and legendary investor Warren Buffett came into the store to see her. After wading his way through acres of bed-room sets, tables and chairs, lamps and rugs, he spotted Mrs. B.

Though she was nearly 90 years old, she remained a bundle of energy, using her electric scooter to zip up and down the aisles as she quoted prices and deliveries to customers, advised her staff and directed where and how to display merchandise.

Buffett had enormous respect for what Mrs. B had achieved and he wanted to buy the Nebraska Furniture Mart. He asked if she would consider selling it and when she said, “Yes,” he asked how much she wanted.

“$60 million,” replied Mrs. B. After a brief conversation, she agreed to sell 90%, with her family retaining 10% and they shook hands on the deal. Because of his respect for her integrity and her business acumen, he made this offer without auditing her books or inventory. Tax returns showed the business made $15 million a year pretax and that satisfied him.

Buffett had a one-page agreement prepared and Mrs. B, who could barely read English and did not write in it, made a mark at the bottom to signify her approval. A few days later, Buffett gave her a check for payment in full.

To close the sale, Mrs. B insisted that she remain the boss and continue to work seven days a week, 10 hours a day, as she had long done. Buffett hardily agreed and she remained active in business for the rest of her 104 years.

Success Tip of the Week:As Rose Blumkin showed us, a lack of a formal education need not prevent business success. The key for her and for any of us is to have passion for what we do and to be alert so that we absorb the crucial knowledge around us.

190 U.S. cities are hosts to immigrant “seedlings” to create “a country within a country”

Do you remember my post of March 5, 2015, “Obama’s amnesty: Illegals to take over America by creating ‘a country within a country’,” about a conference phone call by members of Obama’s cabinet hatching a malevolent plan to use millions of illegal “immigrants” to create “a country within a country”?

The plan is called the Task Force on New Americans, according to which millions of migrants would be used as “seedlings” implanted into innocent, unaware “receiving communities” across the United States. Like parasites, the “seedlings” will be nurtured with food, medical care, credit cards, no-interest loans, and Social Security — all provided by taxpayer dupes. When the “seedlings” mature, they will “emerge from the shadows” and take over and supplant the “receiving communities”. (All words between quotation marks are the words of Obama’s Task Force on New Americans.)

parasite bursts out of human

Below is a list of  190 cities across America where 318 “affiliates” of the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration will act as Refugee Processing Centers. In effect, these cities will be the “receiving communities” to welcome and nurture the “seedlings” that will grow to become “a country within a country.” (Source: U.S. State Dept Refugee Processing Center Affiliate Directory, Nov. 2014)

Note the prevalence of religious charities, especially those of the Catholic and Lutheran Churches, in a collusion of Church and State in this plan to use illegal immigrants and “refugees” from Muslim countries (See “Homeland Security chief says we should ‘give voice to the plight of Muslims’ as Obama administration opens immigration floodgates to Muslims”) to create “a country within a country”.

  1. Anchorage, Alaska: Catholic Social Services
  2. Mobile, Alabama: Catholic Social Services
  3. Springdale, Arkansas: Catholic Charities Immigration Services
  4. Glendale, AZ: International Rescue Committee
  5. Phoenix, AZ: Lutheran Social Services of the Southwest
  6. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Immigrant and Refugee Services
  7. Phoenix, AZ: Refugee Focus
  8. Phoenix, AZ: Catholic Charities Community Services, 1825 W. Northern Ave.
  9. Phoenix, AZ: Catholic Charities Community Services, 615 W. Pierson St.
  10. Tucson, AZ: Refugee Focus, 120 N. Stone Ave.
  11. Tucson, AZ: Catholic Migration & Refugee Sergices
  12. Tucson, AZ: International Rescue Committee
  13. Anaheim, Calif.: East African Community Of Orange County
  14. Fullerton, CA: Crittenton Services For Children & Families
  15. Garden Grove, CA: World Relief Garden Grove
  16. Glendale, CA: International Rescue Committee
  17. Glendale, CA: Immigration And Refugee Services
  18. Glendale, CA: International Institute Of Los Angeles
  19. Los Angeles, CA: Interfaith Refugee & Immigration Service
  20. Los Angeles, CA: Interfaith Refugee And Immigration Ministry Of The Episcopal Diocese Of Los Angeles
  21. Los Angeles, CA: African Community Resource Center
  22. Los Angeles, CA: JFS Immigration And Resettlement Program
  23. Los Gatos, CA: Jewish Family Service Of Silicon Valley
  24. Modesto, CA: World Relief Modesto
  25. Oakland, CA: International Rescue Committee
  26. Oakland, CA: Catholic Charities
  27. Sacramento, CA: Opening Doors, Inc.
  28. Sacramento, CA: International Rescue Committee
  29. Sacramento, CA: Catholic Charities
  30. Sacramento, CA: World Relief Sacramento
  31. San Bernardino, CA: Catholic Charities
  32. San Diego, CA: Alliance For African Assistance
  33. San Diego, CA: Jewish Family Service Of San Diego
  34. San Diego, CA: International Rescue Committee San Diego
  35. San Diego, CA: Catholic Charities
  36. San Francisco, CA: Jewish Family & Children’s Services Of San Franciso
  37. San Francisco, CA: Catholic Charities Cyo
  38. San Jose, CA: International Rescue Committee San Jose
  39. San Jose, CA: Catholic Charities
  40. San Jose, CA: Catholic Charities San Jose – Foster Care
  41. Santa Rosa, CA: Catholic Charities Immigration And Resettlement Services
  42. Turlock, CA: International Rescue Committee
  43. Walnut Creek, CA: Jewish Family & Children’s Services Of East Bay
  44. Colorado Springs, CO: Lutheran Family Services Of Colorado, 132 E Las Animas
  45. Colorado Springs, CO: Lutheran Family Services Of Colorado, 108 E. Saint Vrain Street
  46. Denver, CO: Ecumenical Refugee Services, Inc.
  47. Denver CO: ECDC African Community Center
  48. Denver, CO: Lutheran Family Services Of Colorado, 1600 Downing Street
  49. Denver, CO: Lutheran Family Services Of Colorado, 363 S. Harlan Street
  50. Greeley, CO: Lutheran Family Services Of Colorado
  51. Bridgeport, CT: International Institute Of Connecticut
  52. Hartford, CT: Catholic Charities
  53. New Haven, CT: Integrated Refugee And Immigrant Services (IRIS)
  54. Washington, DC: L.S.S. / National Capital Area
  55. Wilmington, DE: Catholic Charities
  56. Clearwater, FL: Coptic Orthodox Charities
  57. Clearwater, FL: Gulf Coast Jewish Family And Community Services
  58. Delray Beach, FL: Church World Service/Palm Beach (Sub-Office)
  59. Doral, FL: CWS/IRP-Miami
  60. Jacksonville, FL: Lutheran Social Services Of N.E. Florida
  61. Jacksonville, FL: Refugee Resettlement Office
  62. Jacksonville, FL: World Relief Jacksonville
  63. Miami, FL: International Rescue Committee
  64. Miami, FL: Lutheran Services Florida
  65. Miami, FL: Refugee Resettlement Program
  66. Miami, FL: IRSA/Youth Co-Op Inc.
  67. Miami, FL: World Relief Miami
  68. Miami Springs, FL: Episcopal Migration Ministries
  69. Miami Springs, FL: Catholic Charities
  70. Naples, FL: Catholic Charities
  71. North Port, FL: Catholic Charities
  72. Orlando, FL: Lutheran Services Florida
  73. Orlando, FL: Catholic Immig./Refugee Services
  74. Palm Springs, FL: Youth Co-Op, Inc., Palm Springs
  75. Pensacola, FL: Catholic Charities
  76. Plantation, FL: Gulf Coast Jewish Family And Community Services – Broward County office
  77. Riviera Beach, FL: Catholic Charities
  78. Tallahassee, FL: Catholic Charities
  79. Tampa, FL: Lutheran Services Florida
  80. Tampa, FL: Catholic Charities
  81. Atlanta, GA: Refugee Resettlement & Immigration Services Of Atlanta
  82. Atlanta, GA: International Rescue Committee
  83. Atlanta, GA: Lutheran Services Of Georgia
  84. Atlanta, GA: Migration And Refugee Services
  85. Savannah, GA: Lutheran Service Of Georgia
  86. Stone Mountain, GA: World Relief Atlanta
  87. Honolulu, HI: Pacific Gateway Center
  88. Cedar Rapids, IA: Catholic Charities
  89. Des Moines, IA: Catholic Charities, 420 6th Street
  90. Des Moines, IA: Catholic Charities, 601 Grand Avenue
  91. Des Moines, IA: USCRI Des Moines
  92. Boise, ID: Agency For New Americans
  93. Boise, ID: International Rescue Committee
  94. Boise, ID: World Relief Treasure Valley
  95. Twin Falls, ID: College Of Southern Idaho Refugee Programs
  96. Aurora, IL: World Relief Aurora
  97. Chicago, IL: Refugee One
  98. Chicago, IL: Ethiopian Community Association Of Chicago
  99. Chicago, IL: Jewish Child And Family Services Of Chicago
  100. Chicago, IL: Catholic Charities
  101. Chicago, IL: Heartland Alliance For Human Needs And Human Rights
  102. Chicago, IL: World Relief Chicago
  103. Moline, IL: World Relief Moline
  104. Rockford, IL: Catholic Charities
  105. Wheaton, IL: World Relief DuPage
  106. Fort Wayne, IN: Catholic Charities Fort Wayne/South Bend
  107. Gary, IN: Catholic Charities
  108. Indianapolis, IN: Exodus Refugee/Immigration Inc.
  109. Indianapolis, IN: Catholic Social Services
  110. South Bend, IN: American Red Cross- St. Joseph County Chapter
  111. Kansas City, KS: Catholic Charities Of Northeast Kansas, Inc.
  112. Wichita, KS: Episcopal Wichita-Area Refugee Ministry
  113. Wichita, KS: International Rescue Committee
  114. Bowling Green, KY: Western Kentucky Refugee Mutual Assistance
  115. Lexington, KY: Kentucky Refugee Ministries
  116. Louisville, KY: Kentucky Refugee Ministries
  117. Louisville, KY: Catholic Charities
  118. Owensboro, KY: International Center, Owensboro
  119. Alexandria, LA: Resettlement Center Of Central La, Inc.
  120. Baton Rouge, LA: Migration & Refugee Services
  121. Lafayette, LA: Migration & Refugee Services
  122. Metairie, LA: Immigration And Refugee Services
  123. Boston, MA: International Institute Of Boston
  124. Framingham, MA: Jewish Family Service Of Metrowest
  125. Jamaica Plain, MA: Refugee & Immigrant Assistance Center
  126. Lowell, MA: International Institute Of Lowell
  127. South Boston, MA: Refugee & Immigration Services
  128. Springfield, MA: Jewish Family Service Of Western Massachusetts
  129. Waltham, MA: Lutheran Social Services of New England
  130. West Springfield, MA: Lutheran Comm. Svcs Of South New England
  131. Worcester, MA: Refguee And Immigrant Assistance Center
  132. Worcester, MA: Lutheran Social Services Of New England
  133. Worcester, MA: LCS Of Southern New England, Unaccompanied Minors Program
  134. Worcester, MA: Catholic Charities
  135. Baltimore, MD: Jewish Community Services
  136. Baltimore, MD: International Rescue Committee Baltimore
  137. Glen Burnie, MD: World Relief Anne Arundel
  138. Rockville, MD: JSSA Newcomer Resettlement
  139. Silver Spring, MD: African Community Center
  140. Silver Spring, MD: International Rescue Committee
  141. Silver Spring, MD: Lutheran Social Service Of The National Capitol Area
  142. Portland, ME: Catholic Charities Maine
  143. Ann Arbor, MI: Jewish Family Service Of Washtenaw County
  144. Battle Creek, MI: Lutheran Social Services Of Michigan
  145. Clinton Township, MI: CC of South East Michigan – Office Of Migration
  146. Dearborn, MI: USCRI Dearborn
  147. Grand Rapids, MI: Bethany Christian Services-Refugee Resettlement Program
  148. Grand Rapids, MI: Lutheran Social Services Of Michigan
  149. Grand Rapids, MI: Grand Rapids – Foster Care
  150. Grand Rapids, MI:bBethany Christian Services
  151. Lansing, MI: LSS Of Michigan, Unaccompanied Minors Program
  152. Lansing, MI: Refugee Services
  153. Troy, MI: Lutheran Social Services Of Michigan
  154. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota Council Of Churches/Refugee Services
  155. Minneapolis, MN: Minnesota Council Of Churches
  156. Minneapolis, MN: Lutheran Social Services Of Minnesota
  157. Richfield, MN: World Relief Minnesota
  158. Rochester,MN: Catholic Charities
  159. Saint Paul, MN: Migration & Refugee Services
  160. Saint Paul, MN: International Institute Of Minnesota
  161. St. Cloud, MN: Lutheran Social Services Of Minnesota
  162. Columbia, MO: CC of Central and Northern Missouri – Resettlement Office
  163. Kansas City, MO: Della Lamb Community Services
  164. Kansas City, MO: Jewish Vocational Service (JVS)
  165. Saint Louis, MO: Catholic Charities Refugee Services
  166. Saint Louis, MO: International Institute Of Metropolitan St. Louis
  167. Biloxi, MS: Migration And Refugee Center
  168. Jackson, MS: Catholic Charities
  169. Charlotte, NC: Carolina Refugee Resettlement Agency
  170. Charlotte, NC: Catholic Charities Diocese of Charlotte
  171. Durham, NC: Church World Service-IRP
  172. Durham, NC: World Relief Durham
  173. Greensboro, NC: Church World Service-IRP
  174. Greensboro, NC: North Carolina African Services Coalition
  175. High Point, NC: World Relief High Point
  176. New Bern, NC: Diocese Of East Carolina Interfaith Refugee Ministry
  177. Raleigh, NC: Lutheran Family Services In The Carolinas
  178. Raleigh, NC: USCRI NC
  179. Wilmington, NC: East Carolina Interfaith Refugee Ministry – Wilmington
  180. Bismarck, ND: Lutheran Social Services Of North Dakota
  181. Fargo, ND: New American Services- Lutheran Social Services Of North Dakota
  182. Fargo, ND: Lutheran Social Services Of North Dakota Center For The New American
  183. Fargo, ND: LSS Of North Dakota (Foster Care)
  184. Grand Forks, ND: New American Services Of Grand Forks
  185. Grand Forks, ND: Lutheran Social Services Of North Dakota Center, New American Services
  186. Lincoln, NE: Lutheran Refugee Services
  187. Lincoln, NE: Catholic Social Services
  188. Omaha, NE: Lutheran Family Services
  189. Omaha, NE: Southern Sudan Community Association
  190. Concord, NH: Interfaith Refugee Resettlement Program- Lutheran Social Services Of The Ne
  191. Concord, NH: Lutheran Social Services Of New England, Inc.
  192. Manchester, NH: International Institute Of New Hampshire
  193. Camden, NJ: Migration And Refugee Services
  194. East Orange, NJ: Jewish Vocational Service Of Metrowest
  195. Elizabeth, NJ: International Rescue Committee
  196. Albuquerque, NM: Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains
  197. Albuquerque, NM: Catholic Charities
  198. Las Vegas, NV: African Community Center In Las Vegas
  199. Las Vegas, NV: Refugee Assistance Program
  200. Albany, NY: Catholic Charities
  201. Albany, NY: USCRI Albany Field Office
  202. Amityville, NY: Catholic Charities
  203. Binghamton, NY: American Civic Association Inc.
  204. Brooklyn, NY: Catholic Charities
  205. Brooklyn, NY: IRSA Camba
  206. Buffalo, NY: Journey’s End Refugee Services, Inc, Tri-Main Center, 2495 Main Street
  207. Buffalo, NY: Journey’s End Refugee Services, Inc, 2459 Main Street
  208. Buffalo, NY: Jewish Family Service Of Buffalo And Erie County
  209. Buffalo, NY: Refugee Assistance Program Catholic Charities
  210. Buffalo, NY: International Institute Of Buffalo, Inc.
  211. New York, NY: F.E.G.S
  212. New York, NY: International Rescue Committee New York Resettlement
  213. New York, NY: Catholic Charities Community Services
  214. Rochester, NY: Catholic Family Center/Refugee Resettlement Prog
  215. Rochester, NY: Catholic Family Center
  216. Rochester, NY: Catholic Family Center Foster Care
  217. Syracuse, NY: Interfaith Works Of Central New York, 1010 James St.
  218. Syracuse, NY: Interfaith Works Of Central New York, Inc, 3049 E. Genesee Street
  219. Syracuse, NY: Refugee Resettlement Program
  220. Syracuse, NY: Residential And Community Services – Foster Care
  221. Utica, NY: Mohawk Valley Resource Center For Refugees
  222. Akron, OH: International Institute Of Akron, Inc.
  223. Cincinnati, OH: Catholic Charities
  224. Cleveland, OH: Migration And Refugee Services
  225. Cleveland, OH: The International Services Center
  226. Cleveland Heights, OH: Us Together – Cleveland Office
  227. Columbus, OH: Community Refugee And Immigration Services
  228. Columbus, OH: Us Together
  229. Columbus, OH: World Relief Columbus
  230. Dayton, OH: Catholic Social Services
  231. Toledo, OH: US Together – Toledo office
  232. Oklahoma City, OK: Catholic Charities
  233. Tulsa, OK: Catholic Charities
  234. Portland, OR: SOAR/Ecumenical Ministries Of Oregon
  235. Portland, OR: Lutheran Community Services Northwest
  236. Portland, OR: Catholic Charities
  237. Allentown, PA: Lutheran Children and Family Services of Eastern PA
  238. Erie, PA: Catholic Charities
  239. Erie, PA: International Institute of Erie
  240. Harrisburg, PA: Catholic Charities
  241. Lancaster, PA: CWS/IRP/Lancaster C/O Tabor Community Services
  242. Lancaster, PA: Lutheran Children And Family Service Of E. Pa
  243. Philadelphia, PA: HIAS And Council Migration Service Philadelphia
  244. Philadelphia, PA: Lutheran Children & Family Svc Of Eastern Pennsylvania
  245. Philadelphia, PA: Nationalities Service Center Of Philadelphia
  246. Pittsburgh, PA: Acculturation for Justice, Access & Peace Outreach (AJAPO)
  247. Pittsburgh, PA: Jewish Family& Children’s Services Of Pittsburgh
  248. Pittsburgh, PA: Catholic Charities
  249. Pittsburgh, PA: Northern Area Multi Service Center
  250. Roslyn, PA: Lutheran Children And Family Services
  251. Scranton, PA: Catholic Social Services
  252. San Juan, Puerto Rico: Servicios Sociales Catolicos
  253. Providence, RI: Immigration And Refugee Services
  254. Providence, RI: Dorcas International Institute Of Rhode Island
  255. Columbia, SC: Lutheran Family Services In The Carolinas
  256. Huron, SD: Lutheran Social Services Of South Dakota
  257. Sioux Falls, SD: Lutheran Social Services Of South Dakota
  258. Chattanooga, TN: Bridge Refugee Services
  259. Knoxville, TN: Bridge Refugee And Sponsorship Services, Inc.
  260. Memphis, TN: World Relief Memphis
  261. Nashville, TN: Nashville International Center For Empowerment
  262. Nashville, TN: Refugee And Immigration Service
  263. Nashville, TN: World Relief Nashville
  264. Abilene, TX: IRC – Abilene
  265. Amarillo, TX: Refugee Services Of Texas, Inc
  266. Amarillo, TX: Catholic Charities of the Texas Panhandle
  267. Austin, TX: Refugee Services Of Texas, 7801 North Lamar
  268. Austin, TX: Refugee Services Of Texas, 500 E St. John’s Ave.,
  269. Austin, TX: Caritas Of Austin
  270. Corpus Christi, TX: Catholic Social Services
  271. Dallas, TX: Refugee Services Of Texas, Inc
  272. Dallas, TX: International Rescue Committee Dallas
  273. Dallas, TX: Refugee And Empowerment Services
  274. El Paso, TX: Migrant & Refugee Services
  275. Fort Worth, TX: Refugee Services Of Texas, Inc.
  276. Fort Worth, TX: Immigration & Refugee Services
  277. Fort Worth, TX: Catholic Charities
  278. Fort Worth, TX: World Relief Fort Worth
  279. Houston, TX: Interfaith Ministries For Greater Houston
  280. Houston, TX: Alliance For Multicultural Community Services
  281. Houston, TX: Refugee Services Of Texas, Inc
  282. Houston, TX: Catholic Charities
  283. Houston, TX: Children And Family Services Cc Of The Diocese Of Galveston-Houston
  284. Houston, TX: YMCA International Services
  285. San Antonio, TX: Catholic Charities
  286. Salt Lake City, UT: International Rescue Committee
  287. Salt Lake City, UT: Catholic Community Services
  288. Arlington, VA: Refugee Services
  289. Charlottesville, VA: International Rescue Committee
  290. Falls Church, VA: Lutheran Social Services Of The National Capitol Area
  291. Fredericksburg, VA: Refugee Services
  292. Harrisonburg, VA: Church World Service IRP
  293. Newport News, VA: Immigration And Refugee Services
  294. Richmond, VA: Church World Service IRP
  295. Richmond, VA: Commonwealth Catholic Charities
  296. Roanoke, VA: Commonwealth Catholic Charities, 820 Campbell Avenue, Sw
  297. Roanoke, VA: Commonwealth Catholic Charities, 541 Luck Avenue SW
  298. Colchester, VT: Vermont Refugee Resettlement Program
  299. Kent, WA: Jewish Family Service Of Greater Seattle
  300. Kent, WA: World Relief Seattle
  301. Richland, WA: World Relief Tri-Cities
  302. Seattle, WA: Refugee Resettlement Office
  303. Seattle, WA: International Rescue Committee Seattle
  304. Seattle, WA: Lutheran Community Services Northwest
  305. Spokane, WA: World Relief Spokane
  306. Tacoma, WA: Lutheran Community Services Northwest
  307. Tacoma, WA: Catholic Community Services – Foster Care
  308. Vancouver, WA: Lutheran Community Services Northwest
  309. Green Bay, WI: Resettlement & Immigration Services Catholic Charities
  310. Madison, WI: Lutheran Social Services Of Wi And Upper Mi
  311. Milwaukee, WI: Pan-African Community Association
  312. Milwaukee, WI: Lutheran Social Service Of Wi & Upper Mi
  313. Milwaukee, WI: Catholic Charities
  314. Milwaukee, WI: International Institute Of Wisconsin
  315. Oshkosh, WI: World Relief Fox Valley
  316. Sheboygan, WI: Catholic Charities
  317. Charleston, WV: Migration & Refugee Services
  318. Casper, WY: Lutheran Family Services Rocky Mountains

H/t Truth and Action

~Éowyn