Category Archives: crime

Do Justice, Love Mercy, Walk Humbly

Micah-6-8

“He has shown you, O mortal, what is good. And what does the LORD require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.” – Micah 6:8

We have been subjected to a lot of apocalyptic talk in recent days.

One of my family members came back from a big Christian music event, and told me he doesn’t intend to go there again. He said that on the way home, the others in the car with him were talking about how all Christians will soon be rounded up and killed, due to the recent Supreme Court decision on gay marriage. He said he has had it with all the fear talk. One of the geniuses in the car even said there are only about 15,000 real Christians in the country. (I would love to see how he gets his statistics.)

My advice was to remind him of some things that have not changed:

  • Gays are a tiny minority in this country, and the radical ones who want to cause trouble are a tiny minority of the gays. That’s a small number.
  • Christians in America are a majority, which is why each of the elections since Obama was elected have seen landslides for conservatives.The Christians in America are not pacifists. We will fight.
  • God hasn’t abandoned us.
  • The war between good and evil has been going on since Cain killed Abel. People thought the world was ending when Hitler took over.
  • This is not the final round. We don’t stop fighting. We need to be like Rocky Balboa, and get back in the ring. Make the enemy wish they had never started the fight.

Whether the Lord returns today, or 30,000 years from now, whether we leave this earth in the rapture or when our death comes, God’s desire is that we…

Do justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with our God

Let’s be sure that we are found doing good, instead of wasting time speculating on the timing of of things the Father is keeping secret.


Four students face charges of raping mentally disabled girl at North Miami Senior High

Clockwise from top left: Alexis, Bynum, Joseph and Lombard.

Clockwise from top left: Alexis, Bynum, Joseph and Lombard.

Miami Herald: Near the end of a school day early this year at North Miami Senior High, a student approached one of his classmates — a mentally disabled teenage girl in a job training program. He told her she was pretty and asked her to follow him, leading her to another boy who took her hand. They slipped into a janitor’s closet, closed the door, turned out the lights and — joined by three other boys — gang raped her, according to arrest forms.

One boy told her not to tell, but she did after a security guard caught them leaving the closet. The girl later told Miami-Dade school police the boys “forced her to perform oral, anal and vaginal sex acts.”

The charges of the horrific rape left many teachers shaken and worried about security on a campus with 2,400 students. But it has escaped public attention until now, as her four accused assailants face pending trials in Miami-Dade County criminal court.

Kenoldo Alexis, 17, Derek D’Angelo Bynum, 18, Steven Akeem Joseph, 15, and David Lombard, 17, all face felony sexual battery charges on a person with mental disabilities. A fifth student was arrested in the case, but prosecutors dropped the charges against him. Lombard faces an additional charge of battery. Court records show Bynum and Lombard have pleaded not guilty. The others have not yet entered pleas.

“The discovery process is ongoing. We’re trying to get to the bottom of what, if anything, happened — and all the clients remain and are presumed innocent,” said Matthew Ladd, a lawyer representing Lombard. Lawyers for the other teens did not return requests for comment.

In a statement, the school district expressed sympathy for the girl and praised Miami-Dade school police for making arrests in the case. “Our thoughts continue to be with the victim and her family,” the statement read.

Because the girl is a minor, many court records have been redacted, but the basic details are disturbing. Police reports indicate the student has the vocabulary of a toddler, but school district officials and Ladd said that was based on testing more than a decade ago. Efforts to reach the teen’s parents were unsuccessful.

According to a police report, a school security guard caught Joseph leaving the closet along with the victim just minutes before school ended. It’s unclear how long the teens were in the closet, but court files reference a surveillance video that may help prosecutors determine that, as well as who was involved.

Bynum, according to the court documents, told police that he didn’t know the teen was mentally disabled. He initially admitted to forcing the victim to perform oral sex and “telling the victim to stop because she did a terrible job.” But he has pleaded not guilty and, after his arrest, he wrote to the judge on his case to say he was innocent and to ask for help.

“I feel like I’m being tried and accused of something I did not do,” he wrote on notebook paper. “All I want to do is graduate from high school, make my family proud and be somebody. But, this case, I feel like it will ruin my chances and my dreams.” He ended the note with: “I’m sorry. I’m really a good kid.”

Court records show Bynum was expelled from North Miami for “sexual harassment,” according to the school district. He and the other boys were assigned to alternative schools. A trial date has only been set in Lombard’s case, for July 13, but there have been ongoing hearings and subpoenas in all the cases.

Miami-Dade schools spokeswoman Daisy Gonzalez-Diego said the victim was in a job-training program for disabled students who are high-functioning. The teen would have been allowed to walk around school alone as students in the program are largely independent. “While we struggle to understand the senseless depravity of this isolated but disturbing student incident, we commend the deliberate and swift actions of Miami-Dade Schools Police in apprehending the alleged perpetrators,” the district said in an emailed statement.

The arrest of the students in mid-January came just months after another student at the same school said in September that he was raped by three classmates in the gym locker room. Police say they didn’t move forward with the investigation because the boy suffered a mental breakdown and couldn’t be interviewed.

While about a half-dozen students who spoke to the Miami Herald said they felt safe on campus, some teachers say they raised concerns about safety throughout the year at faculty meetings and in conversations with school leadership. “I feel like sometimes, some major incident or catastrophe has to happen before it gets taken care of. That’s horrible to say, but what will it really take to get the staffing that we need or the training that we need,” teacher Annette Quintero asked.

Daniel Martinez, an English teacher at North Miami, said the school began to feel like a mall because so many students would hang out in the hallways. Maj. Adrian Brockington, a retired Army veteran and JROTC instructor at the school, said teachers were regularly asked to monitor the hallways and lunch periods. “We did not have enough security,” he said. “You look outside the classroom door, and you have like 100 students cutting class.”

The school district counters that the school, 13110 NE Eighth Ave., was appropriately staffed with security guards, and pointed out that Miami-Dade has a nationally recognized program that trains teachers to deal with mental health issues.

Miami-Dade school police say North Miami employed 14 security guards when the department’s formula calls for 11 at the school. The district allocates security guards according to a formula that takes into account the number of incidents at a school, student population, campus size and other factors. Police will consider the incidents that occurred this year when deciding on staffing for the next school year.

“The safety and security of our students and staff represent one of our top priorities,” the district wrote in an emailed statement. “While it is nearly impossible to prevent isolated incidents, a clear understanding and review of all surrounding circumstances is undertaken to further perfect safety and security protocols.”

DCG

Number affected by hack soars to 18M, agency head says nobody ‘personally responsible’

responsible

Fox News: Fox News has learned that the number of victims of a pair of massive cyberattacks on U.S. government personnel files has soared to at least 18 million — but the head of the hacked Office of Personnel Management refuses to blame anyone in her agency.

Archuleta: No one is to blame, of course!

Archuleta: No one is to blame, of course!

“I don’t believe anyone is personally responsible,” OPM Director Katherine Archuleta said Tuesday.

The statement came during tense Capitol Hill testimony on a breach that seems to be growing wider by the day. Archuleta, who faced tough questioning at a House hearing last week, likewise faced angry senators on Tuesday before a Senate appropriations subcommittee.

Grilled on whether anyone takes responsibility, Archuleta said only the perpetrators should be blamed — she said current failures result from decades of meager investment in security systems, but said changes are being made and in fact helped detect the latest breaches.

Still, the assurances are unlikely to ease concerns on Capitol Hill and among those who may have been affected. The web has expanded to include not just current and former government workers, but also those who may have applied for a government job. 

The Office of Personnel Management initially estimated about 4 million current and former government workers were affected by one of the hacks. But Fox News is told by multiple sources that lawmakers have been informed the number will grow to at least 18 million — and could, according to one source, soar to as high as 30 million.

During the Senate committee hearing on Tuesday, Archuleta testified that a second hack indeed exposed more individuals, though she said its “scope” and “impact” have not yet been determined. 

She said this separate incident has affected files related to background investigations for “current, former and prospective government employees.” Amid concerns that those affected have been left in the dark, Archuleta said the government would be notifying those whose information may have been compromised “as soon as practicable.” 

Meanwhile, she said a hacker also gained access to the agency’s records with a credential used by a federal contractor. Archuleta told the Senate hearing on Tuesday that an “adversary” somehow obtained a user credential used by KeyPoint Government Solutions, a contractor based in Colorado. She didn’t say specifically when that occurred or if it was related to the two cyberbreaches being discussed.

It was reported earlier that officials, in the second hack, were concerned information may have been stolen from a document known as Standard Form 86, which requires applicants to fill out deeply personal information about mental illnesses, drug and alcohol use, past arrests and bankruptcies. They also require the listing of contacts and relatives, potentially exposing any foreign relatives of U.S. intelligence employees to coercion. Both the applicant’s Social Security number and that of his or her cohabitant is required.

Some officials have implicated China in at least one of the breaches. The new revelations and Tuesday’s hearing come during an awkwardly timed U.S.-China economic dialogue in Washington, where Secretary of State John Kerry is participating.

There are about 2.6 million executive branch civilians, so the majority of the records exposed relate to former employees. Contractor information also has been stolen, officials have said.

Earlier, a major union said it believes the hackers stole Social Security numbers, military records and veterans’ status information, addresses, birth dates, job and pay histories; health insurance, life insurance and pension information; and age, gender and race data.

DCG

Cook shoots and kills robber at Detroit restaurant

DRT (see below)

second amendment

WXYZ.com: Detroit Police say a would-be robber was shot and killed at a Detroit restaurant Sunday morning. According to police, it happened at Pete’s Grill and Coney Island on Outer Drive and Dequindre.

Police say the man walked into the restaurant, announced a hold-up and pointed a gun at the owner. Then, the cook in the back pulled out a gun and shot the robber several times, according to police.

From Clickondetroit.com:

“Next thing I know, I saw everybody getting down on the ground,” said Robert Felton, of Detroit, who was inside the restaurant during the robbery. “This guy was robbing the place. He had the gun on everybody. He was telling everybody, ‘get to the register, I want the register.'”

The employee shot the man, killing him. “Next thing I know, I hear a bunch of gunshots,” Felton said.

Felton told Local 4’s Nick Monacelli that the robber was telling everyone not to move and was waving the gun back and forth. “It was a good thing, because the guy was threatening everybody,” Felton said. “There had to be at least 20 people in the restaurant. The guy that works here, he’s a hero. He’s really a hero.”

Detroit homicide detectives are still investigating to make sure the evidence matches a self-defense shooting.

“When you are being threatened with a weapon and you face a split second decision, you make your decision based on the information you have in front of you at that moment,” said Sgt. Cassandra Lewis of the Detroit Police Department.

DRT

DCG

After Charleston church shooting, Republican strategist Karl Rove joins chorus calling for gun control

Rahm Emanuel, Obama’s first White House adviser and now mayor of gun-control and gun-homicide Chicago, famously said “Never let a serious crisis go to waste.”

Even before the bodies of the nine blacks allegedly shot to death by Dylann Roof in a church in Charleston, SC, went cold, the usual voices calling for gun control are heard, notably:

  • Charleston Mayor Joe Riley blamed the killings on the “easy ability for people to gain possession” of guns. He said, “I personally believe there are far too many guns out there, and access to guns, it’s far too easy. Our society has not been able to deal with that yet.” He then used the church shooting as “another example of why” more gun-control measures should be enacted.
  • Hillary Clinton, in a speech on June 20 at a conference of U.S. mayors, called for “common-sense” gun control measures and said the Charleston shooting was not an “isolated” tragedy, but a chilling reminder of enduring racism and “bigotry” in the U.S. (Source: WSJ)
  • Barack Obama echoed Riley, saying “We don’t have all the facts, but we do know that once again, innocent people were killed in part because someone who wanted to inflict harm had no trouble getting their hand on a gun.”
Joseph P. Riley Jr.

Joseph P. Riley Jr.

Democrat Joseph P. Riley Jr. will be retiring next year after 40 years (!) as Charleston’s mayor. Coincidentally or not, Riley is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition, a bi-partisan gun control group co-chaired by former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg and Boston mayor Thomas Menino.

Yesterday, June 21, on “Fox News Sunday,” Republican strategist and longtime gun rights advocate Karl Rove joined the gun control chorus. He opined that the only way to stop gun-related violence like the Charleston church massacre is to repeal Americans’ Second Amendment rights. Sounding like a teenager with his profligate use of the word “basically,” Rove said:

“I mean basically the only way to guarantee that we will dramatically reduce acts of violence involving guns is to basically remove guns from society, and until somebody gets enough ‘oomph’ to repeal the Second Amendment, that’s not going to happen.”

The Charleston church shooting is tailor-made for gun control advocates. For that reason, although I’m weary to the bone with false flags, I will look into the shooting and report on my findings tomorrow.

See also “Charleston church killer Dylann Roof’s racist manifesto“.

H/t Barry Soetoro, Esq. and Kelleigh.

~Éowyn

St. Thomas More and St. John Fisher

This is the first in FOTM’s new series on the Celestial Army. (Please see my post, “Calling on the Army of Angels and Saints,” for the reason for this series.)

Today, June 22nd, is the Feast Day of St. Thomas More and tomorrow, on June 23rd, is the Feast Day of St. John Fisher — two very brave men who died for the Truth, for their Faith, and for Christ.

Their joint feast day is a timely reminder to Christians in America that we, too, are called to defend our Faith against the Obama administration’s assault on Catholic institutions, under the guise of Obamacare’s contraceptives mandate. Today, it’s Catholics; tomorrow, it will be the Episcopalians, Methodists, Baptists, Evangelicals….

St. Thomas More

Thomas was born in 1478 in England. His father, John, was a barrister and a judge and his mother was Agnes. He received his childhood education at St. Anthony’s school and, at age 13, was received into the household of Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury who was impressed with the lad. Thomas was then sent to Oxford, where he studied at Canterbury College.

Thomas thought he might have a calling to the priesthood and for four years he lived with the London Carthusian monks. However, he did not find a calling to the priesthood. Thomas then studied law and was called to the Bar in 1501 and in 1504 he entered Parliament. In 1505 he married Jane Colt and they had four children, Margaret, Elizabeth, Cecilia and John. Thomas was adamant that his daughters received a scholarly education just like his son. Many religious and learned people of London visited Thomas and his family in their home which was known as a congenial center of learning. In 1510 Jane died, but he later married Alice Middleton, a widow. In 1516, Thomas wrote Utopia, a work of fiction and political philosophy.

Thomas was brought to King Henry VIII’s court and in October of 1529, appointed Lord Chancellor of England, the highest office in England under the King. Thomas became a friend and confidant of Henry VIII, as the King had great respect for Thomas, admiring his intellect, wit, good judgment and holiness.

Henry VIII desired to obtain an annulment from the Pope to his marriage to Catherine of Aragon, so that he could marry Anne Boleyn. Pope Clement VII refused to grant an annulment, finding no valid grounds. Henry was enraged at this denial and forced the English clergy to acknowledge him as “Protector and Supreme Head of the Church of England.”

At this, Thomas resigned as Chancellor; his property confiscated by the King. Thomas and his family became poverty stricken. For 18 months he lived in quiet austerity, engaging himself in writing and with the needs of the household. After King Henry married Anne Boleyn, Thomas refused to attend her coronation.

On March 30, 1534, the Act of Succession provided that the King’s subjects take an oath, which required all English subjects to agree to three clauses: that any heir or offspring of Henry and Anne was a legitimate heir to the throne; that the marriage between Henry and Catherine was null and void; and that the Bishop of Rome, the Pope, had no more authority or power in England than any other bishop. Anyone who refused to sign the oath was guilty of high treason punishable by death.

On April 13, 1534, Thomas and John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, were given the oath to sign, but they both refused to sign it because of the latter two clauses. Consequently, on April 17, 1534, both Thomas and Fisher were imprisoned in the Tower of London. During this time, Thomas suffered greatly, separated from his family whom he loved so much. But it was also during his incarceration that Thomas began to write the Dialogue of Comfort against Tribulation, the best of his spiritual works, and The Sadness of Christ.

Toward the man who put him in prison, Thomas not only prayed daily for Henry, he thanked the King for his imprisonment, which Thomas called “the very greatest” of “all the great benefits” the king “has heaped so thickly upon me.” With prescience, Thomas wrote to his daughter Margaret that “no matter how bad it seems,” great good would come from his death.

On February 1, 1535, the Act of Supremacy came into operation, giving the title of “only supreme head of the Church of England” to the king and made it treason to deny it. Thomas was asked while he was in the Tower his opinion of the Act, but he refused to give his opinion. On June 22nd, now-Cardinal John Fisher was beheaded on Tower Hill. Nine days after, on July 1, 1535, Thomas was indicted and tried in Westminster Hall for opposing the Act of Supremacy, with false testimony from Richard Rich, the Solicitor General of Wales.

At the trial, Thomas broke his long silence and defended himself with competence, brilliance, and holiness, which intimidated his accusers and judges. He argued that, just as London lacked authority to annul an act of Parliament for the whole of England, so Parliament lacked authority to transfer governance of the Church to the king, since the Church had been entrusted by God to the bishops and the Pope. Thomas noted that this was codified in the Magna Carta 200 years earlier and affirmed in the king’s coronation oath.

Intimidated by King Henry, the jury convicted Thomas of treason. On July 6, 1535, Thomas was taken to be beheaded at Tower Hill. Weak and emaciated, he asked the Lord Lieutenant of the Tower to help him up the steps of the scaffold, but still managed wryly to quip, “As for my coming down, let me shift for myself.” A Paris newsletter published this description by an eye-witness:

“He spoke little before his execution. Only he asked that bystanders to pray for him in this world, and he would pray for them elsewhere.  He then begged them earnestly to pray for the King, that it might please God to give him good counsel, protesting that he dies the King’s good servant, but God’s first.”

The husband of Thomas’ daughter, Margaret, recorded that Thomas asked those present “to pray for him, and to bear witness with him that he should now there suffer death, in and for the faith of the Holy Catholic Church.”

400 years after his martyrdom, on May 19, 1935, the bells in St. Peter’s Basilica rang with joy as Thomas More was canonized a saint, along with St. John Fisher. In November of 2000, Pope John Paul II proclaimed St. Thomas More the patron saint of politicians “for proclaiming the truth in season and out.”

St. John Fisher

John was born in 1469 in Beverly, Yorkshire, the eldest of four children of Robert and Agnes Fisher. Robert Fisher died when John was only 8; his mother remarried and had five more children. John attended Beverly grammar school and later, Cambridge University. He became Proctor of Cambridge in or about 1494, and was appointed Master Debator three years later. On July 5, 1501, he became a doctor of sacred theology; 10 days later, he was elected Vice Chancellor of the University. From 1505 to 1508, John served as the president of Queens’ College: He created scholarships, introduced Greek and Hebrew into the university curriculum, and brought in the world-famous Erasmus as Professor of Divinity and Greek. John was known as a great theologian through his writings in defense of the Sacraments, especially the priesthood and the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist. In 1504, he became both Bishop of Rochester, the poorest diocese in England, as well as Chancellor of Cambridge. As Chancellor, he tutored then Prince Henry, who later became King Henry VIII. John loved his flock in Rochester as they also loved him, tending especially to the poor and the children.

From 1527 on forward, Bishop Fisher resolutely opposed Henry VIII’s divorce proceedings against Queen Catherine. Unlike all of the other bishops, John Fisher refused to take the Oath of Succession for the same reasons as Thomas More. Therefore, he was imprisoned in the Tower of London in April of 1534. That very next year while he remained in prison, the Pope made him a Cardinal. Angered by this, Henry VIII retaliated by beheading Cardinal Fisher within a month.

A half hour before his execution on June 22, 1535, Cardinal Fisher opened his New Testament to this passage in the Gospel of John:

“Eternal life is this: to know You, the only true God, and Him Whom You have sent, Jesus Christ. I have given You glory on earth by finishing the work You gave me to do. Do you now, Father, give me glory at Your side.” 

Fisher then closed his New Testament and said, “There is enough learning in that to last me the rest of my life.”

William Rastell, Thomas More’s nephew, witnessed the martyrdom of Cardinal Fisher. He said that Fisher in a strong and very loud voice spoke to the large crowd, “Christian people, I am come hither to die for the faith of Christ’s Catholic Church.” He asked for their prayers and prayed, “God save the king and the realm, and hold His holy hand over it, and send the king a good counsel.” He then knelt, said the hymn of praise, Te Deum, and some short prayers, laid his neck upon the block, and was executed.

On May 19, 1935, along with Thomas More, John Fisher was canonized a saint.

In his Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation, St. Thomas More urges us to have the courage and conviction to “die for the truth” with Christ.

We live in a time in America of a culture war against Christ and Christianity. The culture war is now a political war because of the Obama administration’s assault on religious autonomy and liberty. Against the tide of false political correctness and the threat of punishment and sanctions, will we stand firm and remain true to Christ and to our Faith?

St. Thomas and St. John so loved Jesus, they willingly died for Him. May we find inspiration in their examples as we live our faith with courage, integrity, honor and steadfastness.

We are not servants of Obama or any ruler. We are God’s servants, first and last!

~Joan

Sources:

Butler’s Lives of the Saints, edited by Michael Walsh
The King’s Good Servant But God’s First, by James Monti
Catholic Insight
Catholic Online
Catholic Wisdom, edited by John A. Hardon, S.J.

Good news criminals: Uber bans drivers and passengers from carrying guns!

stoopid

DailyMail: Ride-hailing app company Uber says it is banning its riders and drivers from carrying guns. Uber Technologies says it is banning firearms of any kind during rides arranged through the Uber platform, and drivers or riders who violate the rule may lose access to the platform. The rules also apply to Uber’s affiliates. The company said on Friday it changed its firearms policy on June 10, before the recent shooting at a church in Charleston, South Carolina, brought renewed attention to gun violence in America.

Uber said it wants to make sure riders and drivers feel safe and comfortable.  In a statement, the app company said it made the change after reviewing feedback from both passengers and Uber drivers. Previously it had deferred to local law on the issue.

San Francisco-based Uber lets passengers summon cars through an app in more than 250 cities worldwide, and the privately held company is valued at around $40billion.  However it’s faced legal and regulatory challenges as it expands in the United States and abroad. It has also been criticized over the thoroughness of the background checks it does on drivers and other safety issues.

In April, an Uber driver with a concealed-carry permit shot a 22-year-old man who had opened fire on a group of pedestrians in Chicago.  Court records say the man was shooting at pedestrians who were walking in front of the Uber driver’s vehicle, and the driver shot the gunman.  The driver wasn’t charged, as prosecutors said he acted in defense of himself and others.

Competitor Lyft also has a ‘no weapons’ policy. According to Lyft’s website, if a driver or rider is found to have a weapon in a Lyft vehicle they’ll be barred from the platform regardless of local laws on weapons possession.

Taxi drivers in New York City are not allowed to carry firearms, despite repeated requests from industry groups that they be allowed to do so.  Drivers in other cities such as Washington DC are also not allowed to have guns.

Uber does not own the cars that its drivers use and says it does not employ the drivers.nHowever, a California court recently ruled that at least one driver based in the state was an employee rather than an independent contractor.

DCG