Author Archives: DCG

Calif. mom claims retailer booted her for complaining about man in girls’ restroom

All hail diversity!


Fox News: A California mom who says she was recently kicked out of a sporting goods store after alerting a manager that man had frightened her young daughter in the women’s restroom is demanding answers – and a policy change – from the Washington-based chain.

The woman, who spoke to but asked not to be identified, said she was shopping with her 12-year-old daughter and the girl’s younger friend when her daughter told her what had happened moments earlier at an REI sporting goods store during a shopping trip in late August.

“We started to drive to another store and she said to me, ‘Mom, I need to tell you something,’” said the woman. “I asked her what was wrong and she told me ‘A man used the bathroom while we were in there and it scared me.’”


When the mother turned the car around and went back to the store to confront the manager of the Santa Rosa store, she said she was stunned to learn that the man, who she said was not dressed in women’s clothes and did not appear outwardly to be transgender, had done nothing wrong in the eyes of the employees and other customers. “I spoke with the manager and told her what happened,” the mother said. “She didn’t skip a beat. She told me that REI does not decide who people are or what they can do.

The exchange didn’t stop there, according to the woman, who said the unidentified store manager lectured her in front of customers before ordering her to leave. “She told me that if a man came back into the bathroom that they would do nothing,” she said. “That they had no right to tell someone which bathroom to be used. Then she told that if it happens again that I shouldn’t expect anything to be done about it.

The angry mom contacted The Pacific Justice Institute, a California-based law advocacy group, which has fired off letters to both the Santa Rosa store and company headquarters calling for an apology and a clear policy to protect the safety and privacy of customers using public restrooms. The legal nonprofit cited California’s civil rights laws, a building code mandating gender-specific restrooms and the right to privacy set forth in the state constitution.

“It’s one thing for a stranger of the opposite sex go into the ladies bathroom and traumatize young girls,” Brad Dacus, president of the Pacific Justice Institute, told “It’s another to have the sanction and blessing of the store manager.

“Any reasonable person would feel shocked and emotional violated with a member of the opposite sex coming into their restroom,” he added. “This man’s intention, whatever they may have been, in no way negates the shock.”

A spokesperson for REI, which stands for Recreational Equipment, Inc. and has 140 stores in 33 states, said officials are are looking into the alleged incident. “Everything REI does is for our members and customers, so we pay close attention to all customer comments,” REI spokesman Mike Ferris said. “Walking into an REI should always be a great, positive experience that helps you explore the outdoors. REI customers can be assured that safety in our stores is paramount. We are looking into this report to get the facts and understand the circumstances fully.”

California is grappling with the issue of transgenders and public restrooms, passing a recent, controversial law mandating that public schools allow students to choose the restroom associated with their own gender perception. The city of West Hollywood in 2014 began requiring all businesses to make their single-stall restrooms gender-neutral. Similar laws were passed in Washington, D.C., in 2006 and Philadelphia in 2013, where it was required that new or renovated city-owned buildings must include unisex bathrooms.

The California law has been met with opposition, with a counter bill being proposed for a November 2016 ballot. The Personal Privacy Protection Act aims to mandate that people in government facilities would use a restroom according to their biological sex and not based on which gender they may identify with, The law also aims to protect business owners from potential lawsuits for requiring that employees use bathrooms based on their sex.


Seattle VA office lost records; veterans told benefits ending

War on our military.


Seattle Times: Dozens of West Coast military veterans incorrectly received letters indicating they’d lose unemployment benefits after an overworked Department of Veterans Affairs office in Seattle lost track of records the veterans had submitted, according to a VA Inspector General report released this week.

The mail audit stemmed from a complaint that suggested about 1,000 pieces of unread mail from veterans were being stored indefinitely in a yellow bucket without a response from employees assigned to evaluate benefits claims. In some cases, the complaint alleged, veterans were told they’d lose unemployment benefits because they had not returned information to the office in a timely manner, even though they had met their deadlines. The unemployment benefits are given to veterans who can’t hold a job because of a service-connected disability.

Auditors who visited the Seattle office in April did not find a bucket loaded with unread letters, as had been alleged in the complaint. But they took a sampling of 132 employment questionnaires and determined that one-fifth of the veterans had been sent letters indicating a reduction or cancellation of benefits, even though they’d mailed forms that should have allowed them to continue receiving money.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., on Friday wrote a letter to VA Secretary Robert McDonald asking him to immediately implement reforms recommended in the report, such as increasing training and demanding a high-level corrective-action plan from a VA undersecretary to address broader problems with record management.

“I am shocked by the findings of this report and I hope you will agree this situation is entirely unacceptable. This is exactly the type of mismanagement and negligence that further complicates the benefits process for veterans, leading to unnecessary stress and unacceptably delaying benefits to which these veterans are entitled,” Murray wrote.

The VA Office of Inspector General publishes reports on issues at different VA hospitals almost daily. This week’s report focusing on unread employment questionnaires fits into a series of audits the IG launched last year centered on mismanagement of veteran records.

Others in the set included:

  • A Baltimore supervisor stockpiling 8,000 documents, including 1,500 records with sensitive personal information about veterans.
  • An Oakland, Calif., office that neglected to act on thousands of claims.
  • Employees at different offices who manipulated internal records to falsify reports on the processing of claims.

In Seattle, managers of the regional office that processes veterans benefit claims acknowledged it had fallen behind in processing unemployment records. It hired a dozen more employees in April to catch up on the backlog, the report said.


See also:


Obama goes beyond mere gun control, hints at confiscation

He did promise fundamental transformation.


Breitbart: When President Obama spoke in reaction to the heinous October 1 attack on Umpqua Community College, he went beyond his usual calls for more gun control and suggested instead that America consider following the path blazed by Australia and Great Britain.

In the mid-1990s Australia and Great Britain both instituted what were virtually complete bans on firearm possession.

Obama referenced the bans thus:

“We know that other countries, in response to one mass shooting, have been able to craft laws that almost eliminate mass shootings.  Friends of ours, allies of ours — Great Britain, Australia, countries like ours.  So we know there are ways to prevent it.

And Obama is not the only one who suggested taking a gun-free approach to American life. The anti-Second Amendment message was also pushed by Slate, Vox, and Dan Savage.

For example, on October 1 Slate ran a story reminding readers that Australia enacted their gun ban in response to an attack on April 28, 1996, wherein a gunman “opened fire on tourists in a seaside resort in Port Arthur, Tasmania.” Thirty-five were killed and 23 others wounded in the attack. Twelve days later Australia’s government banned guns, period.

On October 2 Vox explained that Australia “confiscated 650,000 guns” via a “mandatory gun buyback” program which forced gun owners to hand their firearms over for destruction. Vox claims the result was that “murders and suicides plummeted’ and suggested such a path might be an option for America following “the murder of at least 10 people at Umpqua Community College.”

Vox did not mention that “firearm-related murder and non-negligent homicide” began plummeting in America in the mid-1990s as well. But in America, the decrease in violent crime did not correlate with a gun ban but with a rapid expansion in the number of guns privately owned. The Congressional Research Service reported that the number of privately owned firearms in America went from 192 million in 1994 to 310 million privately owned firearms in 2009. Subsequently, the “firearm-related murder and non-negligent homicide” rate fell from 6.6 per 100,000 in 1993 to 3.6 per 100,000 in 2000 and finally to 3.2 per 100,000 in 2011.

But none of this made any difference to Dan Savage, who responded to the attack on Umpqua Community College by calling for the Second Amendment’s repeal. Savage tweeted, “Fk the NRA, fk the gun nuts, f**k the Second Amendment — better yet, repeal the Second Amendment.

Shannon Watts, mouthpiece for Moms Demand Action, tweeted this yesterday: “The father of the gunman who killed 9 in #UCCShooting said this about his son’s actions today on @CNN. #gunsense (with the statement below).

ucc shooter dad response

I have two words for these people:

molon labe


California weighs banning concealed handguns on campuses

What could possibly go wrong?


Sacramento Bee: Already praised by many gun control advocates for having the strictest firearms laws in the country, California is once again considering a move to tighten its restrictions with a ban on the concealed carry of handguns at colleges and schools.

Last year, California was the first in the nation to let families and police act to temporarily remove weapons from those considered at risk of violence. This time, it would follow dozens of other states that previously put similar prohibitions in place – and a growing number moving in the opposite direction to expand gun rights on campuses.

The concealed carry legislation, now on Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk, puts California in the midst of a policy debate gaining prominence as gun advocates such as the National Rifle Association, having won significant victories guaranteeing the right of ownership, turn their focus to the right to carry and the status of firearms in public spaces.

“There’s no question that the power of the NRA is at its height today,” said John Donohue, a professor at Stanford Law School who studies the effects of gun laws on public safety. “People who want guns don’t want to have restrictions that impede them going about their daily lives.”

Current California law makes it illegal to possess a firearm within 1,000 feet of a school or on a college campus without permission from administrators, but it includes exemptions for retired law enforcement and concealed carry permits.

Lois Wolk

Lois Wolk

Senate Bill 707, by Sen. Lois Wolk, D-Davis, would expand the prohibition on school and college grounds to include concealed weapons, while keeping the same rules in place for the 1,000-foot zone surrounding schools and for law enforcement. On a nearly party-line vote, with Democrats in support and Republicans opposed, lawmakers approved the measure in early September; Brown has until Oct. 11 to act.

The idea for the bill came from university and college police, who say school officials should have more control over campus safety. Concealed handgun permits, which require residents to show “good cause” that they are in immediate danger, are handed out by county sheriffs, who vary in their interpretation of the policy.

Lurking on the periphery are two federal developments that could seriously undermine California’s restrictive law: Legislation proposed in Congress would require states to recognize concealed carry permits issued anywhere, though it has not yet advanced, and a lawsuit now at the appellate level has already seen one judge strike down the “good cause” requirement as unconstitutional. “If the decision of the 9th Circuit affirms the lower court, that will open the floodgates for people to get concealed carry permits,” Donohue said.

In a statement, Wolk said SB 707 “would put California more in line with most states that already forbid concealed firearms on school or college campuses.”

“This is one of the unusual cases where California law is more lax than other states,” she said. “Most people I hear from are astonished that someone could legally carry a concealed firearm on to school grounds.”

The 2007 shooting at Virginia Tech – still one of the deadliest in history with 33 casualties, including the perpetrator, and another 17 wounded – generated intense controversy over gun policy and brought the question of campus carry to the national stage. Eight years later, it continues to echo.

In a national address Thursday, President Barack Obama decried the lack of legislative effort to prevent further mass shootings, like the one that day at Umpqua Community College in Oregon, where a gunman killed nine people before dying in a shootout with police. The Oregon higher education board had previously banned guns from college campuses, but a court overturned that policy in 2011, stating that only the Legislature had the authority to regulate firearms.

California has faced recent incidents like the 2014 Isla Vista rampage that claimed the lives of six UC Santa Barbara students and their killer, and a confrontation at Sacramento City College last month that left one dead.

gun free zone

Much of the fight over campus carry boils down to whether guns make us more or less safe. Advocates argue that students with firearms may be able to help prevent crimes such as mass shootings and rapes.

Shannon Grove gets it

Shannon Grove gets it

Speaking against SB 707 on the Assembly floor, Assemblywoman Shannon Grove said carrying concealed weapons could offer a “sense of protection” to young women. “If I’m walking down the street at night, my Glock puts me on even footing with anybody that would ever try to come and hurt me,” the Bakersfield Republican said. During a Senate deliberation, Sen. John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa, suggested it could be “a very strong way to curtail some of the nonsense that’s going on” with campus sexual assaults.

Laura Cutilleta

Laura Cutilleta

Gun control supporters counter that throwing firearms onto a campus with young people, alcohol, mental health issues and strongly-held beliefs on controversial topics is a dangerous mix. “It’s a fairly volatile environment,” said Laura Cutilleta, senior staff attorney for the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which advocated for SB 707. “To add guns to that is just alarming.”

It’s a debate that’s not likely to be settled any time soon. At least 14 states have introduced legislation to allow guns on campus in each of the past three years, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. “We think it’s a really important issue,” NRA spokeswoman Amy Hunter said. “The right to personal safety doesn’t disappear the second you step on a campus.”


Gwyneth Paltrow: “Incredibly close to the common woman”…now buy these shirts worth $6,000

She’s as close to the “common woman” as is the wife of her idol, Obama.


Daily Mail: Gwyneth Paltrow has encouraged shoppers to spend up to $6,000 on T-shirts available on her website Goop. The 43-year-old actress selected her choice of the 11 best tops, which cost up to $350 each, and said women would ‘want 17 of them’. LA-born Gwyneth is estimated to be worth around $136million and said earlier this year, ‘I am incredibly close to the common woman’.

The text on the actress’s website states: ‘When you find the right T-shirt, you want 17 of them in your closet. ‘And you want them to last forever and never disintegrate.’

$275 t-shirt

$275 t-shirt

It goes on to say that designers often stop making discontinue lines, and so advises shoppers to stockpile their favorites. It introduces them as ‘our favorite T-shirts right now – the ones we’re buying in bulk to see us through the next few seasons’. And they’re all available to buy on Goop.

$295 top

$295 top

The T-shirts cost from a more reasonable $38 for a simple black tee with white stripes on the arms by Alternative Apparel, right through to $350 for a Mother of Pearl paget tulip jersey. If shoppers take the advice to ‘buy 17’ of the latter, it would cost them a whopping $5,950.

But justifying the purchase of the pricey Mother of Pearl top, the site says: ‘This has the spirit of a T-shirt, but it’s fancy enough to wear to a dinner party.’

$350 top

$350 top

Other recommended tops include a $275 plain grey number by NLST, which is described as ‘the fancy solution to old-school thermals’, and a $295 ‘business on the top, party on the bottom’ Mother of Pearl white-sleeved peplum top.

The mother to 11-year-old Apple and Moses, nine, said on CNN Money in March this year, ‘I am incredibly close to the common woman, in that I am a woman and a mother.’

It seems, however, the star may have lost touch with what exactly the ‘common’ woman can afford.


Girl denied inhaler during coughing fit, per school district policy

Liberal Logic: No notification of an inhaler that the girl took out of her own back pack? Bad. Free condoms and abortion pills without parental notification? Good.

homeschool (WEST JORDAN, Ut.) — A 9-year-old girl was denied her inhaler during a coughing fit at school in West Jordan because staff were not notified of the child’s prescription, Jordan School District officials said Monday.

Emma Gonzales obtained an inhaler over the weekend after a coughing fit landed her in the emergency room, KSTU reports. On Monday, the fourth grader was hit with another coughing spell in class at Columbia Elementary. When Emma took her inhaler out to use it, her teacher sent her to the office, where staff took the inhaler.

Emma said she started coughing so hard she threw up on her pants. “When I get into the coughing fit, I kind of hurtle up on the ground, can’t breathe and then I start to kind of feel a little nauseous,” Emma said.

District officials say the staff did everything right by taking the medication to make sure it was for that specific student. The inhaler doesn’t have Emma’s name on it and the school had not been notified that she was taking the medication.


Crime Stoppers Cops & Robbers 5K Pursuit!

I’m sure #BlackLivesMatter will deem this as raaaaacist.

light the night against crime

I heard an ad for this on the radio and decided to check it out. Apparently this event is happening in San Diego and  Wichita Falls this year. It appears it has taken place at other cities in the past.


From the Wichita Falls web site:

“Mark your calendars for October 3, 2015.   It’s time for the Cops and Robbers 5K pursuit in downtown Wichita Falls. Come dressed as a Cop or Robber and enjoy the excitement and the thrill of the chase.  This is a fun event for all!! “

You know if anyone dresses like these people, the #BlackLivesMatter crowd will have a fit.

Darren Wilson

Michael Brown

Michael Brown

Ferguson robber

Ferguson robber