Obama told Hawaii classmates he’s Kenyan/Indonesian royalty

Not only is the POS a liar from the beginning, he also is delusional.

From ages 6 to 10, young Barry Soetoro Obama lived in Jakarta, Indonesia, with his mother and step-dad Lolo Soetoro. In 1971, mom sent him back to Hawaii to live with her parents, Madelyn and Stanley Dunham, in Honolulu.

Madelyn was the vice president of a bank. Stanley not only got his Kansas pal, Communist Party member Frank Marshall Davis, to mentor his grandson, Stanley also used his connections to finagle an admission for his grandson into the exclusive private Punahou School, one of the most expensive schools in Honolulu. There, B.S. Obama studied for 8 years, from ages 10 to 18, until he graduated from high school in 1979.

Since the 2008 presidential campaign, one of the many curiosities about Obama is that so few people have come forth, claiming they had known him. As an example, despite Obama being touted for his brilliant intellect and interpersonal charm, there is not a single fellow student or faculty member who’s said they knew Obama in the two years he was at Columbia University.

Now, however, a woman has stepped forward, saying that she was a classmate of Obama’s in Punahou School.

Kristin Caldwell

In a PBS Frontline interview conducted on June 27, 2012, Kristine Caldwell (who now lives in California) said she grew up and attended Punahou School with “Barry” Obama. The two even graduated together, in 1979. She recalls how Barry alternatively told classmates he was an Indonesian prince or Kenyan royalty. The following is from the transcript of her interview:

I went to Punahou School in Honolulu. I was there from kindergarten starting in 1966 through high school, graduating in 1979, along with the president.

When I first met Barry, when he showed up I think it was the summer before fifth grade, he was hanging out at the tennis courts. [...]

So yeah, I can picture him as this slightly — “chubby” is too strong, but rounded, short little guy, Barry Obama. And he told us that his father was an Indonesian king and that he was a prince, and after he finished school he was going to go back, and he would be a ruler in Indonesia. And I absolutely believed him.

I understand that he told his fifth-grade class that he was Kenyan royalty, but I never heard that story until years later. My sister and I remember very clearly that he was an Indonesian prince and that he would be going back there. So there was some reference to where he had come from, and the understanding was his family was there. [...]

I can only imagine now, a 10-year-old leaving his mother and stepfather and at that point I think baby stepsister. So he lived in Hawaii from when he was born until he was 6, lived in Indonesia from 6 to 10. Arriving in Hawaii — again, having not been there — I would think he would have felt very, very fish-out-of-water, very uncomfortable, and like anybody, he’d have to have a little bit of bravado to mask the insecurities. So I think that was the prince story. [...]

You know, a lot of people say, “Wow, yes, I saw that he was going to be president.” … To me he was a normal kid. But to be fair, probably no kid at Punahou is really a normal kid. So he didn’t seem outstanding academically or athletically or any other way. To me he seemed normal. [...] I didn’t see this great thinker, orator, cool under pressure. And I think to a large degree, as he matured, he developed that [...] But yeah, I think he certainly bloomed, blossomed. I guess what I’d say is when I watched his speech at the Democratic National Convention in 2004 [...] I was so impressed and excited. [...] wow, he was an amazing orator and he had wonderful words that he said [...]

He was a decent student. He was a decent athlete. He was a decent guy. I think he was well liked. But he wasn’t a big man on campus. He didn’t run for student government or anything. [...] If you look at our high school program, the senior year graduation program, commencement, it has everybody’s names, and it has — you have an asterisk or a little plus next to you if you graduated with honors, or if you got the President’s Award, and Barry doesn’t have either one. [...] I think people who got the President’s Award were considered pretty special. I think that Barry really found himself and his stride, I would say, later, I would say after Punahou.

H/t ObamaReleaseYourRecords

Psychologists say pathological narcissists feel empty inside, and so they compensate for that by concocting a grandiose but false self. Among the American Psychological Association Diagnostic Statistical Manual’s criterial attributes of the Narcissistic Personality Disorder are:

  • Has a grandiose sense of self-importance.
  • Is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love.
  • Believes that he or she is “special” and unique….

By Kristine Caldwell’s account of Barry Obama in their Punahou School years, he was “normal”, that is, ordinary. There was nothing extraordinary about him: Neither a brilliant intellect nor a great athlete nor even a hardworking student, he displayed nothing that would lead his classmates to mark him as “most likely to succeed.” Despite his mediocrity, young Barry imagined himself to be uniquely special, claiming he was an Indonesian prince to some and, to others, a Kenyan royalty. Earlier, while young Barry was still living in Indonesia, he had proclaimed he wanted to be the country’s prime minister when he grows up.

But the reality is neither his Indonesian stepfather, nor his (alleged) Kenyan father Barack Hussein Obama Sr., nor his (rumored) real biological father Frank Marshall Davis, was royalty.

In this, however, Barry was special and unique: He was/is a pathological narcissist, with a grandiose sense of self-importance, from the beginning. In 2008, he even managed to con millions of Americans and millions more across the world that he was their king and messiah.

~Eowyn

7 responses to “Obama told Hawaii classmates he’s Kenyan/Indonesian royalty

  1. Thank you Dr. Eowyn for this fascinating post. Clearly, the king is a narcissist, he is a liar, and as we learned last night, so is Biden. To say that he was Kenyan royalty shows that narcissistic fantasy that he held on to, even from childhood. His obvious strut, his body language substantiate that he is a narcissist.

  2. Ahh! He seemed normal. My middle-school neice once said she was the smartest person in the world and wanted to be president. Save this to use against her in case she gets elected 30 years down the road.

  3. I wondered the same thing too, Kathy. Why speak up now? Very odd.

  4. Caldwell didn’t make these comments to denigrate the POS. She’s still a supporter. Despite her own observation that Barry was not distinguished in any way in the 8 years she had known him in Punahou, she insisted that he must have “blossomed” later.

    “…because they received not the love of the truth, that they might be saved. And for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie:” (2 Thessalonians 2:10b-11)

  5. I note that most serial-killers also share the Obamamama’s psychological profile. Well, he’s certainly pushed up the body counts all around on that score, hasn’t he? By acting out as he does, to his weak-minded sense of self, he likely feels “more manly”. He’s so far from a true warrior that he’d get a heart attack if he saw the shadow of one. And I don’t feel I’m being catty or cutting here, just expressing what I feel is a clear look at his character, such as it is.

  6. First, Dr. Eowyn, we can’t thank you enough out here for finding these gems! Second, I do believe skinny Barry is mentally unhinged. Something is tragically wrong. A humorous aside: my precious four-year-old precocious grandson informs me at times that HE is the smartest person on earth. It’s my problem when I believe him!!

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