Japan Sinking?

More than a month after a 9.0 magnitude earthquake hit northeastern Japan, followed by the even more devastating 30-ft high tsunami and the continuing nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, the beleaguered Japanese people are still experiencing aftershock after shock. Aftershocks of 4.5 magnitude or higher have numbered over 800!

Here’s a very disturbing video shot just 4 days ago near Tokyo, of a paved street literally heaving like liquid, and of water seeping out of cracks in the road:

Makes you wonder if this Japanese-language disaster movie, The Sinking of Japan – the top-grossing disaster movie in Japan in 2006 — was on to something…

~Eowyn

7 responses to “Japan Sinking?

  1. Sadly it is very likely one day that Japan sinks. We have been warned for the last four decades that this could happen. I feel sorry for the Japanese people at the moment as they are facing a very difficult situation; my heart goes to the people (around 150 000) who are in shelters and have lost everything while they are threatened by the nuclear accident.

    • Corsican,

      What do you mean by “We have been warned for the last four decades that this could happen” ???

      Who did the warning? Any scientific basis? More details, please.

  2. lowtechgrannie

    Everyone living on the ring of fire, including the west coast of the US faces this same possibility. A recent report on the local news said that with new technology in space photography, 16 faultlines have been identified that intersect the area of Seattle. Much of Seattle is built on fill dirt over tide flats, yet, the powers that be are planning construction of a traffic tunnel along the waterfront. We have minor earthquakes on a regualr basis. One day, we will be in the same situation as Japan.

  3. The convergence of the tectonic plates has created a subduction zone just off the Japanese coast. This is represented by a trench and a really incredible underwater scarp that elbows-in near Tokyo and runs north to around Petropavlovsk, Russia.

    You can get an idea of the scale by just looking at Google’s rather crude map of the submerged terrain, here (link):
    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=japan&aq=&sll=35.603719,145.634766&sspn=49.739055,93.076172&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Japan&ll=41.804078,146.425781&spn=23.15823,46.538086&t=h&z=5

    The Pacific plate is diving under the Asian plate, creating the Japanese Islands but possibly someday rolling them under as well.

  4. that’s just eerie…can’t imagine what they are living through right now.

  5. I live in Japan, and it’s not sinking! What you’re seeing in this video is “liquefaction!” It’s highly likely that the area in this video was built upon reclaimed land. For example, take note of the first few seconds where the sidewalk is heaving. See how a straight line starts to form in the bricks. This is likely where a underwater pipe or gas line exists. The pipe was laid and the area filled and even though it was packed, it was likely loose dirt that was used. Similarly when the water was able to rise up through the area by the bicycle rack. That’s the result of the loose dirt underneath settling and the water rushing to the surface. Japan, as a whole is not sinking! The reclaimed areas are settling as a result of all the shaking…

  6. There was a 9.0 earthquake. That is about 100 times worse than a 7.0 that few people in America have been in. It settled earth, it broke pipes, it caused rain water to get in places it usually isnt.

    It is not sinking. Well maybe slowly but millions of years is a while to wait.

    Japan on the whole is quite solid and more solid than most of the USA. It is so solid you cannot build or farm on most of it. That is one of the reasons it is so crowded.

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