The Empty Tomb

It was very early on the first day of the week and still dark, when Mary of Magdala came to the tomb. She saw that the stone had been moved away from the tomb and came running to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved. “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb,” she said, “and we don’t know where they have put him.” So Peter set out with the other disciple to go to the tomb. They…saw the linen cloths lying on the ground…and…believed. Till this moment they had still not understood the scripture, that he must rise from the dead. -John 20:1-9

Here’s a reconstruction of what happened from the book The Truth About the Shroud of Turin (Regnery, 2010), pp. 189-191, by my friend Robert K. Wilcox. No matter how many times I read this, it never fails to move me to tears.

The tomb, a rocky chamber carved out of a hillside, a stone rolled against the door, is dark and silent. Lying on a slab is a long, rectangular cocoon, the hills and valleys of which are clearly the contours of a human body. The body of Jesus lies there, face up, a ribbon around the head and chin to keep the mouth closed, packed on all sides with bags of spices.

At some unknown moment in the dead of night, the air in the tomb becomes electric.

At first the vibrations are minute, the sort that could be detected by sensitive twentieth-century instruments; then they dramatically increase until they shake the ground and blow the boulder from the door.

A glow, faint at first, emanating from the shroud suddenly intensifies until rays of light shoot through the threads, star-filled golden rays filling the tomb and pouring out the door.

For thirty seconds — no more — the blinding, pulsating movement continues.

The source of the activity is the corpse, the body, somehow being revitalized, dematerialized, its mass being converted into energy, pure energy, which in the material world is radiant white light.

The body rises from the slab through the cloth, hovers for a moment in midair, then disappears.

The cocoon collapses. Darkness returns. Shouts of “Earthquake! Earthquake!” diminish as the guards run for their lives. And in the air, the distinct odor of scorched linen.

When dawn comes, the women in Jesus’ life draw tentatively toward the tomb, look in the opening, and see the shroud unopened, still wrapped, but definitely deflated. The body is gone. At sunrise the disciples come. John enters the tomb, puts his hand on the cloth, and presses it to the slab. Jesus is there no longer. The disciples and the women quickly gather up the burial garments — the chin band is still in the shroud — and the spice bags and leave before the Romans can return.

At another time, in another place, when they have a chance to gather their wits, they will discover the figure of their master imprinted on the inside of the shroud. The images would be faint, probably not as dark as the passage of time and exposure to air have made them; and the images would be negative ones, a phenomenon that would also become clearer with the passage of time. Regardless, they would view these images as holy — imprints of their precious Lord. The disciples would pay more attention to the images on the shroud if they weren’t already waiting, with the greatest anticipation, for Jesus himself, who, before his death, had promised to visit them after he rose from the dead.

lilies

Our Lord is Risen!

A Joyous Easter to all!

~Eowyn

A more sober Caption Contest. Are you up to the challenge?

This is the 71st world-famous FOTM Caption Contest!

Here’s the pic (click to enlarge):

The People vs. BLM Cliven Bundy’s supporters (right) face off the BLM (left) on April 12, 2014, Nevada (photo by Jesselyn Bickley of Desert Valley Times)

See also “Eyewitness says BLM “scared crapless” by THOUSANDS of patriots supporting NV rancher Bundy.”

You know the drill:

  • Enter the contest by submitting your caption as a comment on FOTM, not via email.
  • The winner of the Caption Contest will get a orgeous Award Certificate of Excellence and a year’s free subscription to FOTM! :D
  • FOTM writers will vote for the winner.
  • Any captions proffered by FOTM writers, no matter how brilliant (ha ha), will not be considered. :(

This contest will be closed in a week, at the end of next Tuesday, April 22, 2014.

To get the contest going, here’s my caption:

The Battle of Lexington of the Second American Revolutionary War, 2014.

For the winners of our last Caption Contest, click here.

Seen any good pics that you think would be great for our Caption Contest? Email them to us! :D

fellowshipminds@gmail.com

~Eowyn

Police State U.S.A.

Dr. Eowyn:

A year after the Boston Marathon bombings, a pervasive surveillance system over the entire city of Boston is in place. Nor is Boston the only U.S. city being watched.

That, and the militarization of local police and federal agencies that include the Railroad Retirement Board (!), add up to a disquieting picture of America as a police state.

H/t FOTM’s CSM

Originally posted on Consortium of Defense Analysts:

Watertown2

On April 19, 2013, during a manhunt in Boston suburb Watertown, MA, for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, police and federal agents spent the day storming people’s homes and performing illegal searches

Heavily armed SWAT police ripped people from their homes at gunpoint,marched the residents out with their hands raised above their heads in submission, and then stormed the homes to perform their warrantless searches.

Watertown1

This was part of a larger operation that involved a total lockdown of Watertown. A No-Fly Zone was declared over the town of 31,915; roads were barricaded; vehicle traffic was prohibited. People were ordered to stay indoors; businesses were told not to open. National Guard soldiers helped with the lockdown, and were photographed checking IDs of pedestrians on the streets, while SWAT teams searched house to house, all without a warrant.

Giuseppe Macri reports for The Daily Caller, April 17, 2014, that a…

View original 1,199 more words

Hilarious! Cats and dogs who hate to be kissed

H/t FOTM’s CSM

~Eowyn

Woman’s fight against City of Seattle will continue, even in death

parking lot

MyNorthwest.com: A property rights fight near Seattle’s waterfront will continue, despite the death of the property owner.

Late last year, the Seattle City Council voted to used its powers of eminent domain to take the parking lot owned by a 103-year-old Spokane woman named Myrtle Woldson.

The city asked her to sell. She refused. So the city council simply voted to condemn the property and take it.

What got so many people fired up about this case is that the city wasn’t going to do anything different with the property.

It was planning to use the 130-car parking lot as a parking lot. It just wanted the revenue from the lot for the city’s bottom line. The city continues to need a lot of parking on the waterfront during the construction of the much-delayed tunnel project.

Woldson planned to fight city hall all the way. KIRO Radio learned Thursday that Woldson died over the weekend at the age of 104.

Gary Beck manages and operates the 130-car lot on Western Avenue for Woldson. “You just don’t know how much stress this put on her trying to fight the city from what I think is illegal,” he said.

So far, the city has not moved on its plans to take “Myrtle’s Lot,” as its known, and Beck said he will continue to operate the lot for her estate. “We’ll continue to operate it until such time as we’re told by her estate or by attorneys whether the city wins or not,” he said.

It’s expected that Woldson’s estate will continue to fight the city should it make the move to take her property.

Woldson was a well-known philanthropist in Spokane who donated millions of dollars to a variety of charities. She was independently wealthy, as the daughter of the owner of Northern Pacific Railway.

Beck said she was an incredible lady. “She was sharp all the way up until she passed away,” he said. “She was just amazing. Tough. She knew what she wanted, and she went out and got it.”

Woldson’s funeral will be held Monday. For now, the parking lot is still in her name.

mafia

DCG

 

Easter toons!

Easter2Easter3Easter6Easter4Easter5Easter7Easter8EasterEaster1

H/t FOTM’s Wild Bill Alaska

~Eowyn

Obama removes all U.S. battle tanks from Europe

Dr. Eowyn:

That, in turn, means the United States, henceforth, will not be able to fight a land war in Europe.

H/t John Rolls of the Rolls Report

Originally posted on Consortium of Defense Analysts:

Amidst the still-ongoing crisis in Ukraine, the Obama administration is moving the last U.S. battle tanks from Germany and, thus, from Europe.

At the same time, the Pentagon also is disbanding two of the U.S. Army’s heavy brigades in Germany. Last year, the 170th Infantry out of Baumholder disbanded, while the 172nd Separate Infantry Brigade at Grafenwöhr is in the process of doing the same.

Abram tank out of GermanyOne of 22 Abram battle tanks, bound for South Carolina, being loaded at the railhead in Kaisersalutern, Germany (photo by Alexander Burnett/U.S. Army). 

John Vandiver reports for Stars and Stripes, April 4, 2014, that the U.S. Army’s 69-year history of basing main battle tanks on German soil quietly ended last month when 22 Abrams tanks, a main feature of armored combat units throughout the Cold War, embarked for the U.S.

On March 18, the remaining tanks were loaded up at the 21st Theater Sustainment…

View original 412 more words

Leaders of 9 western states meet to take land back from federal govt

The United States of America was founded, not as a centralized state wherein all power is concentrated in the central government, but as a federation wherein political power is diffused by dividing it between a national (federal) government and the republic’s constituent state governments.

Our Founders conceived federalism as one of the institutional mechanisms to check and balance political power so as to prevent government from being so dictatorial as to become a threat to the People’s inherent rights and liberties.

This founding principle of federalism is codified in the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution:

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

But America has been drifting away from the founding vision, with the federal government amassing more and more power, and the presidency becoming increasingly imperial.

For the first time, political leaders of NINE western states have convened to talk about wresting control of state lands away from the federal government.

Western states lawmakersL to r: Montana House Speaker Mark Blasdel, Utah state Rep. Ken Ivory, Montana state Sen. Jennifer Fielder, Idaho House Speaker Scott Bedke, Utah House Speaker Becky Lockhart (photo by Scott Sommerdorf, Salt Lake Tribune)

Kristen Moulton reports for The Salt Lake Tribune that on April 18, 2014, more than 50 political leaders (state legislators and county commissioners) from 9 western states convened a daylong closed-door meeting in Salt Lake City, the Legislative Summit on the Transfer for Public Landsto talk about wresting control of their oil-, timber- and mineral-rich lands away from the federal government.

The nine western states were Arizona, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

The summit was organized by Utah state Rep. Ken Ivory and Montana state Sen. Jennifer Fielder. U.S. Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) also attended the meeting and addressed the group over lunch.

The summit, described by Ivory as “It’s simply time. The urgency is now,” had already been in the works before this month’s tense standoff between Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and the Bureau of Land Management over cattle grazing.

Utah Speaker of the House Becky Lockhart said, “What’s happened in Nevada is really just a symptom of a much larger problem.” She emphasized that the states’ intent was never to take over national parks and wilderness created by an act of Congress. “We are not interested in having control of every acre. There are lands that are off the table that rightly have been designated by the federal government.”

Montana state Sen. Fielder said federal land management is hamstrung by bad policies, politicized science and severe federal budget cuts: “Those of us who live in the rural areas know how to take care of lands. We have to start managing these lands. It’s the right thing to do for our people, for our environment, for our economy and for our freedoms.”

Idaho Speaker of the House Scott Bedke said, “It’s time the states in the West come of age. We’re every bit as capable of managing the lands in our boundaries as the states east of Colorado.” As evidence, Bedke pointed to how Idaho’s state-managed forests and rangeland have suffered less damage and watershed degradation from wildfire than lands managed by federal agencies.

Utah state Rep. Ivory said the issue is of interest to urban as well as rural lawmakers, in part because they see oilfields and other resources that could be developed to create jobs and fund education. Moreover, the federal government’s debt threatens both its management of vast tracts of the West as well as its ability to come through with payments in lieu of taxes to the states. Utah gets 32% of its revenue from the federal government, much of it unrelated to public lands. Ivory warns, “If we don’t stand up and act, seeing that trajectory of what’s coming … those problems are going to get bigger.”

In 2013, Utah’s state legislature passed HB142, which was sponsored by Ivory and signed by Gov. Gary Herbert. HB142 demands the federal government make good on its promises in the 1894 Enabling Act for Utah to become a state, by relinquishing title to federal lands in Utah. A study is underway at the University of Utah to analyze how Utah could manage the land now in federal control.

None of the other Western states has gone as far as Utah, demanding Congress turn over federal lands. But five have task forces or other analyses underway to get a handle on the costs and benefits.

~Eowyn