“I Could Work If I Wanted to…”

I found the following at http://adrianvance.blogspot.com/?view=classic

A Ford dealer reports: Tom Selkis’ (Latham Ford) Facebook – True story recently at the dealership.

“One of my salesmen had a woman in his office yesterday wanting to lease a brand new Focus. As he was reviewing her credit application with her he noticed she was on social security disability.

He said to her you don’t look like you’re disabled and unable to work. She said, “Well I’m really not. I could work if I wanted to, but I make more now than I did when I was working and got hurt.” (A non-disabling injury).

She said the government sends her $1500.00 a month disability check. And, she gets $700.00 a month on an EBT card (food stamps), plus $800.00 a month for rent.”

In addition a free cell phone and 250 minutes free on her phone, per month
It all adds up to $3500.00 a month.

When she was working, she was taking home about $330.00 per week, $1,320 per month. Do the math and then ask yourself why the Hell should she ever go back to work?

If you multiply that by millions of people, you realize the scope of the real problem we face as a country. Putting people out of work breeds socialists!

When the socialists have 51% of the population in that same scenario, we are finished and they are getting their fast if they have not achieved it already. This is the Obama Plan.

We have 92.6 million people not working from a potential work force of 180 million, 51.4% unemployed. We have crossed the threshold to permanent socialism unless the Republicans convince the people that working offers opportunity for much more. but they seem to only want to imitate Democrats with their versions of the same programs!

When there are not enough people working to support these people what happens? Riots? Civil War for “benefits.” Be prepared to protect your homes and especially any stored food.

She didn’t lease the Focus because the dealer down the road beat our deal by $10.00/month.

Glad to know she is so frugal with our hard earned money.”

Submitted by James and Shirley Howard, Edited by Adrian Vance

Both CDC and U.S. Army say Ebola can be transmitted by air

From the beginning of the Ebola epidemic last spring in West Africa, the federal government’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had insisted that the deadly viral hemorrhagic fever (in the infection’s horrific end stage, the victim bleeds from every orifice) can only be transmitted via direct contact with a victim’s bodily fluids — blood, vomit, urine, feces, sweat, nasal discharge, or semen.

This, despite a Canadian research in 2012 which found the Ebola virus to be transmitted by air between one animal species (pigs) and another (monkeys).

On Oct. 2, 2014, however, the CDC changed their minds.

For the first time, the CDC, in the person of its director Tom Frieden, cryptically admitted that, “in theory,” a sneeze or cough “could” spread the virus from someone experiencing Ebola symptoms. Frieden did not explain what “in theory” means. (See “CDC now admits ‘in theory’ Ebola can be transmitted by air“)

Imagine my surprise when, on the tip of a reader of this blog, I discovered that the United States Army had known about this all along, since 2011 — that the Ebola virus can be transmitted by air, albeit in “rare” instances.

Army Ebola

On pages 116-117 of Medical Management of Biological Casualties Handbook (7th Edition), published by the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases in Sept. 2011, is said:

“Lassa, CCHF, Ebola and Marburg viruses may be particularly prone to nosocomial spread due to periods of high viremia corresponding with bleeding propensity. In several instances, secondary infections among contacts and medical personnel without direct bodily fluid exposure have been documented. These instances have prompted concern of a rare phenomenon of aerosol transmission of infection.”

Here’s a screenshot I took of the passage:

Army Ebola pp. 116-117

Note that:

  • The word “nosocomial” is defined as “Originating or taking place in a hospital, acquired in a hospital, especially in reference to an infection.”
  • The word “viremia” is defined as “The presence of a virus in the blood.”
  • In the passage above, “high viremia” simply means the presence of a lot of Ebola viruses in the blood.
  • The word “aerosol” means “A fine spray or mist.”

Translated into simpler English, the passage from the U.S. Army medical handbook should read:

The Ebola virus may be particularly prone to spread in a hospital environment where Ebola patients with a lot of the virus in their blood are bleeding profusely. “Several” instances of Ebola infections had resulted among contacts and medical personnel without direct bodily fluid exposure. These “rare” instances have prompted concern that Ebola can be transmitted via a fine spray or mist.

Translated into even simpler English, that means you can catch Ebola from inhaling microscopic particles of the blood or vomit or sneeze or cough spewed into the air by someone who is very sick with Ebola, even if you think you were following the CDC guidelines by making no bodily contact with the bodily fluids of the infected.

Read the Medical Management of Biological Casualties Handbook for yourself, here.

Do you feel safer now? /sarc

H/t FOTM’s CSM

~Eowyn

Family of 10 y.o. boy who murdered 90 y.o. woman doesn’t want him back

Tristen Kurilla

American society is breeding psychopaths.

The angelic-looking boy in the pic above is one of them.

He is Tristen Kurilla, age 10.

On Oct. 14, 2014, the AP and Daily Mail report that 10-year-old Tristen Kurilla from Pennsylvania has been charged as an adult in the beating death of a 90-year-old woman, Helen Novak.

Novak was in the care of Tristen’s grandfather, Anthony Virbitsky, on Sky Lake Road in Damascus Township, Pennsylvania.

Prosecutors in Wayne County said that on Oct. 11, county emergency responders got a call reporting the death of an elderly woman, Helen Novak.

District Attorney Janine Edwards said in a statement that Tristen’s mother, Martha Virbitsky, had brought the boy in to the state police barracks at Honesdale the same afternoon and reported that her son had told her that he had gone into the woman’s room to ask her a question and she yelled at him. So “he got mad, lost his temper and grabbed a cane and put it around Novak’s throat,” police said.

When Tristen was advised of his rights and interviewed by a trooper, the boy said he “pulled Novak down on the bed and held the cane on her throat and then punched her numerous times.” Tristen then went to his grandfather and first told him that the woman was “bleeding from her mouth” but denied he had harmed her.

Later, the boy admitted that he had punched the woman and put a cane around her neck. He described how he had pushed the cane into Novak’s throat for several seconds and then punched her five times in the throat and the stomach. “I was only trying to hurt her,” Kurilla told detectives.

Police said an autopsy performed at Wayne Memorial Hospital in Honesdale indicated blunt force trauma to the victim’s neck, and the death was ruled a homicide. Dr. Gary Ross also said the boy’s account to police “was consistent with the injuries he observed.”

Tristen was charged as an adult with criminal homicide and aggravated assault, with the prosecutor’s office noting that the crime of homicide “is specifically excluded from the juvenile act” and therefore “a juvenile who commits the crime of homicide is charged as an adult.” Kurilla is being held without bail pending an October 22 preliminary hearing.

According to court documents cited by WFMZ, the boy’s mother, Martha Virbitsky, told police she “has had a lot of trouble with Tristen and that he has had some mental difficulties.”

Here is another pic of Kurilla making the I-love-you devil’s horns sign:tristen-kurillaAccording to Ericka Sóuter of CafeMom, Oct. 16, 2014:

Tristen’s “parents don’t want him back. They reportedly would rather have the poor, troubled child behind bars awaiting trial than with them. [...]

Since being taken into custody, he has been held at jail in a private cell. Originally, the family’s attorney had petitioned to have the boy returned to his father or moved to a juvenile detention center. But that request has been rescinded. The juvenile facility is over 90 miles away, making it too hard to visit. As for the other option — they don’t want him back under their roof. His parents, apparently, are an ‘emotional wreck’ and don’t feel comfortable having him in their care. [...] So they want him to stay just where he is. They believe he is being treated well and is allowed to color and play. [...] Tristen may see things differently. Detectives found a piece of paper in his cell with ‘How to Escape’ written on it.”

~Eowyn

That’s rich: After hiring Ebola crisis actors, NYT decries Ebola conspiracy theories

The august New York Times used paid “crisis actors” in its video report on the Ebola epidemic from Liberia — and, in so doing, feeds conspiracy theories about Ebola — but has the audacity (Obama’s favorite word) to publish an article decrying Ebola conspiracy theories.

Beginning at the 8:08 mark in the video above, you’ll see the New York Times‘ video report of a young man wearing a neon-green t-shirt supposedly sick with Ebola, who flung himself to the ground outside a health clinic. Note that he displays none of the symptoms of Ebola: no sweat, no vomit, no diarrhea.

Most damning is the fact that, beg. at the 12:42 mark in the video, as he was walking away from the camera, the young man’s father stuffed a handful of cash into his back pocket.

Ebola cash

My post on this, “Is Ebola pandemic a false flag?,” also dealt with CNN similarly resorting to crisis actors in its reporting on Ebola. Ask yourself this question:

Why would NYT and CNN hire Liberians to PRETEND they’re deathly ill with Ebola? 

See also these other fake reportings by CNN at Sandy Hook and the Gulf War.

Below is Alan Feuer’s hypocritical New York Times article of Oct. 18, 2014, on Ebola conspiracy theories.

~Eowyn

do as i say

The Ebola Conspiracy Theories

The spread of Ebola from western Africa to suburban Texas has brought with it another strain of contagion: conspiracy theories.

The outbreak began in September, when The Daily Observer, a Liberian newspaper, published an article alleging that the virus was not what it seemed — a medical disaster — but rather a bioweapon designed by the United States military to depopulate the planet. Not long after, accusations appeared online contending that the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had patented the virus and was poised to make a fortune from a new vaccine it had created with the pharmaceutical industry. There were even reports that the New World Order, that classic conspiracy bugbear involving global elites, had engineered Ebola in order to impose quarantines, travel bans and eventually martial law.

While most of these theories have so far lingered on the fringes of the Internet, a few stubborn cases have crept into the mainstream. In the last few weeks, conservative figures like Rush Limbaugh and Laura Ingraham have floated the idea that President Obama had sent aid to Africa, risking American lives, because of his guilt over slavery and colonialism. And just days ago, the hip-hop artist Chris Brown took to Twitter, announcing to his 13 million followers: “I don’t know … but I think this Ebola epidemic is a form of population control.”

Conspiracy theories have always moved in tandem with the news, offering shadow explanations for distressing or perplexing events. Though typically dismissed as a destructive mix of mendacity and nonsense, they often reflect societal fears.

“Conspiracy theories don’t have to be true to tell us something about ourselves,” said Michael Barkun, a professor emeritus of political science at Syracuse University and the author of “Culture of Conspiracy: Apocalyptic Visions in Contemporary America.” “They’re not effective as accurate accounts — they’re effective as expressions of anxiety.”

The notion, for example, that health officials are conspiring with Big Pharma to consciously spread — and then cure — Ebola as a profit-making venture might sound like the plot to a cheesy summer thriller, but in fact it touches on a genuine aspect of our health care system, said Mark Fenster, a professor at the University of Florida’s Levin College of Law and the author of “Conspiracy Theories: Secrecy and Power in American Culture.”

“The truth is that we do rely on private corporations to develop and produce our pharmaceuticals,” he said. “While we may not like that fact, it’s not so hard or paranoid to imagine private companies acting in their own best interests.”

The theory works, Professor Fenster added, because it is “truthy,” to borrow from the comedian Stephen Colbert. Which is to say, it has just enough veracity “that it rings true when carried to Ebola,” he said.

It’s not surprising that populist and anti-government conspiracies are rampant at a moment when opinion polls suggest that our trust in government has reached a record low. In fact, most theories pit those who perceive themselves as powerless against a dominant cabal of secretive elites.

That model certainly seems to fit the allegation that the Department of Defense created Ebola in a military lab to loose on the world as a Malthusian device to reduce the population. “Conspiracies against the powerless tend to be effective because the masses often feel that way,” James F. Broderick, an English professor at New Jersey City University and co-author of “Web of Conspiracy: A Guide to Conspiracy Theory Sites on the Internet,” said. “They reflect and reinforce the idea that ordinary citizens are victims of the government.”

Viral outbreaks, as a genre, have long attracted conspiracy theorists, beginning in medieval times when the Jewish leaders of Toledo, Spain, were blamed for having spread the Black Plague. More recently, the AIDS epidemic was also said to have been caused by a government plot.

The Ebola virus, experts say, is classic conspiracy theory fodder: a silent killer that penetrates the body undetected and lies dormant for weeks. Its sources are obscure, its symptoms horrific.

“Diseases in particular are suited to conspiracy because they are invisible and invisibly transmitted,” Professor Barkun said. “Our senses can’t tell us exactly how the danger spreads. The theory has an answer for what mystifies and frightens.”

Many conspiracy theorists pride themselves on having inside information, but in the case of Ebola such alleged information, or misinformation — the government is in on it! — can erode the public trust when it’s needed most.

“If these were just opinions that people spouted off on talk radio or at dinner parties, you could argue that there wasn’t much harm,” Professor Broderick said. “But to have the C.D.C. debased in public as a puppet of the New World Order or of major corporations is obviously a dangerous proposition.”

 Nonetheless, some scholars find value in conspiracy theories because they allow us to vent and give voice to hidden fears.

“I view these things as a way of framing the world, of offering us narratives,” Professor Fenster said. “And they’re not necessarily a bad thing. Conspiracy theories are something that’s available in American discourse as a way of telling stories, as a way of explaining who we are.”

Cats in tight places

Why are cats fatally attracted to boxes and other hole-ly places? LOL

cats1cats2cats3cats4cats5cats6cats7cats8

Source: Daily Mail

Part 2, tomorrow!

~Eowyn

Colorado State bans purchase of most SUVs but governor, family still chauffeured in them

hicken

Watchdog.org: Last year, the Colorado Department of Personnel & Administration, in an attempt to improve the state fleet’s environmental friendliness, issued a policy that prevents most departments from buying all-wheel-drive sports utility vehicles.

Yet, Gov. John Hickenlooper and his family are still chauffeured around in two SUVs, which according to government figures get about 22 miles a gallon highway and 16 mpg in city driving in the six cylinder version. The mileage drops to 17 and 12 if the vehicles use E85 fuel, according to http://www.fueleconomy.gov.

The DPA policy exempts law enforcement vehicles from the SUV ban, and state officials argue that the governor’s SUVs are law enforcement because he, and his family, are driven around by state troopers.

“Those are public safety vehicles,” said DPA spokeswoman Sabrina D’Agosta. “The governor does not choose the type of vehicles, and the SUVs are driven by law enforcement agents.”

But Gregory Golyansky, president of the Colorado Union of Taxpayers, said the governor should be setting an example if he and his cabinet are pushing for green vehicles. “This governor is a proponent of all kinds of green fantasies,” he said. “If they are so useful, the government wouldn’t have to require departments to buy them.”

The Dec. 9, 2013, vehicle ordering instructions has a section titled “Additional Greening State Government Guidelines to follow.” The section restricts “the purchase of four-wheel drive sport utility vehicles (SUV), except where necessary for law enforcement, emergency response, highway maintenance and construction or use in difficult terrain.” All SUVs require the approval of the executive director, but state patrol refused to comment on the governor’s SUVs, citing security concerns, and directed all questions to the governor’s office.

Hickenlooper did not answer questions about his SUVs after an unrelated news conference last month.

But records obtained under state open records laws show the two vehicles labeled “sta wgn midsize 4X4” were purchased in 2011, before the no-SUV policy, for about $26,000 each. One is labeled “Governor’s Vehicle” in the state records and the other is “Governor’s Family Vehicle.”

Taxpayers paid nearly $12,000 since July 2012 to fill up the governor’s vehicle with gasoline almost exclusively and nearly $9,000 for the family vehicle in the same time period, records show. About 60,000 miles were placed on the governor’s vehicle and 42,000 on the family vehicle in the past two fiscal years, records show.

Hickenlooper staff refused to provide the make and model of the two vehicles, but Hickenlooper arrived at a recent event in the Chevy Equinox. “For security reasons, Colorado State Patrol has not authorized us to release publicly the make and model of the Governor’s vehicles,” wrote Ben Figa, Hickenlooper’s deputy legal counsel.

Despite the records saying the vehicle is a station wagon, Consumer Reports, JD Power and Edmunds list the Equinox as a mid-size SUV.

Hickenlooper is not unique in having a personal vehicle and a family vehicle. Those were provided to past governors for security purposes. But his administration set a policy banning the purchase of SUVs for most departments.

“It’s an act of hypocrisy,” Golyansky said. “It’s not the first from this governor and not the last.”

But D’Agosta said Hickenlooper is trying to be more fuel efficient that previous governors. “He’s the first governor to use a mid-sized SUV,” she said. “All previous governors had Suburbans and fueling costs were twice as much.”

do as i say

DCG

Dozens of Obama’s sons & daughters brawl at AZ State Fair

In his brilliant bestseller on evil, People of the Lie, the late psychiatrist M. Scott Peck, M.D., wrote that we can’t hope to cure a disease if we refuse to name it.

Once again, however, America’s pusillanimous media cower from naming the disease by refusing to report the truth.

This time, it is a “brawl” at the Arizona State Fair in Phoenix.

And as in so many similar brawls, flash mobs, knock-out games race riots, the media use the coy euphemism of “teens” in place of “blacks” — a fact that you can see with your own eyes in these screen shots I took from the 3TV news video.

AZ state fair riot1AZ state fair riot2AZ state fair3AZ state fair4AZ state fair5

Karen Brown reports for 3TV that more than two dozen teens were arrested after a large fight on the first night of the Arizona State Fair, Oct. 10, 2014.

Police say as many as 60 “teens” from the same neighborhood were involved in the fight. The “teens” even began fighting with police officers who stepped in.

An adult woman was seen kicking and hitting a police officer. She was one of two adults arrested.

The fight continued several blocks from the fairgrounds, located at 19th Avenue and McDowell Road.

The Arizona Department of Public Safety said that 35 “teens” were arrested and released to their parents.

About 75 officers from multiple agencies were assigned to the state fair.
“To prevent this from happening again, we’re gonna have a stronger presence here, said Maj. Ken Hunter with the Arizona Department of Public Safety. “At the gate, there will be more aggressive searches and we will be very visible throughout the rest of the fair.”

See also:

~Eowyn