Your Guardian Angel’s Day

Today is the feast day of our Guardian Angels!

A 2007 Harris poll found that 74% of U.S. adults believed in angels.

The word “angel,” in Greek is angelos, in Hebrew is malach, in Arabic is mala’ika– which all mean “messenger.”

Angels are incorporeal (bodiless) spiritual beings who act as intermediaries between God and humanity. Angels are defined by their function as message-bearers, although this function does not exhaust their activities. As spirits, they are believed to have been created by God to serve the supreme deity by fulfilling any and all tasks assigned to them. St. Thomas Aquinas maintained that each Angel is unique, a species unto itself — a truly mind-boggling idea.

Major philosophers — such as the great medieval theologian Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274), René Descartes, John Locke, and most recently, the American philosopher Mortimer Adler — have put forth compelling reasoning for the existence of Angels. (For the conversion of Adler, a Jew, to the Catholic faith, see the moving account, “A Philosopher-Pagan Comes Home“.)

Scripture tells us there is a hierarchy of Angels — there are various gradations or “orders” of Angels. We know this because in Genesis 3:24, Isaiah 6:1-7, Ezekiel 1, 10, Romans 8:38, Ephesians 1:21, 3:10, 6:12, Colossians 1:16, 2:10, 2:15, allusions are made to “seraphim,” “cherubim,” “thrones,” “dominions,” “mights,” “powers,” and “principalities” in the “heavenly places.”

Aquinas and other theologians say ​there are five orders of angels, but only the last five angelic orders (Virtues, Powers, Principalities, Archangels, Angels) minister to bodily creatures and, of them, only the last three minister to human beings. That, of course, suggests Virtues and Powers minister to nonhuman bodily creatures, including animals whom St. Bonaventure called “creatures without sin”! Isn’t that a happy thought? — that our pets also have angels?

  • Principalities are in charge of the whole of humanity — of nations or countries.
  • Archangels minister to nations — their leaders and those persons whom God tasks with special work to do on earth.
  • Angels, the last order, are God’s messengers and guardians of individual human beings.

How do we know each of us has a Guardian Angel?

Because Jesus tells us so!

“See that you despise not one of these little ones: for I say to you that their angels in heaven always see the face of my Father who is in heaven.” (Matthew 18:10)

According to St. Thomas Aquinas, a guardian angel is appointed by God’s loving providence to each human being from the moment of birth because “the dignity of human souls is great.”

Throughout the lives of “changeable and fallible” human beings, their guardian angels assist them toward goodness. Although the guardians never fail or forsake their human charges, they eschew interfering with divine providence or with our free will—to commit sin if we so choose, to endure trials and troubles, and to suffer punishment.

When I see a drunk or derelict sleeping on a bus bench or curled up in a street corner, I can’t help but wonder how very sad their guardian angels must be. Imagine what it must be like to be the guardian angel of a serial killer . . . .

St. Thomas also wrote that at the end of a human being’s earthly life, the guardian angel of the virtuous person will be replaced with an angelic companion because the guardian’s mission will have been successfully discharged. The wicked in Hell, however, “will have a fallen angel to punish him” for eternity. [Source: Msgr. Paul J. Glenn, A Tour of the Summa (Rockford, Illinois: Tan Books, 1978), p. 93.]

Just because we can’t see them doesn’t mean our guardian angels aren’t with us all the time. In fact, there are many stories of angelic encounters and assistance. See, for example:

You’ll find more angel stories on FOTM’s “Angels & Saints” page,

My days are so busy with blogging and house- and garden-work that the only time when my mind is at rest is when I’m taking my solitary walk in the hills. On one such walk, I talked to my guardian angel and humbly asked him to show me he’s there. Instantaneously, I felt his presence walking alongside me, to my right. I can’t tell you what he looks like (he is a bodiless spirit after all), but what I felt was his staggeringly-profound LOVE — a love that is unconditional, the depths of which I’ve never experienced from a human.

Guardian Angel

Here’s a simple prayer to our guardian angels, by St. Bonaventure (1221-1274):

Angel of God, my guardian dear,
to whom His Love commits me here,
ever this day be at my side,
to light and guard,
to rule and guide. Amen.

Talk to your Guardian Angel!

He loves you very very much, more than you’ll ever know.

And thank your Guardian Angel today and every day — for watching over and protecting you, and for loving you in spite of ourselves. 

~Eowyn

Caption Contest: Little man in Big chair

This is the 83rd world-famous FOTM Caption Contest!

Here’s the pic:

O's UN chair

The pic above was taken of the POS at the United Nations General Assembly on Sept. 24, 2014, where he gave a speech in which he actually compared the ongoing Islamic State’s violence in the Middle East with the racial riots in Ferguson, Missouri. This was the chair the UN had him sit in. (Source: Twitchy)

You know the drill:

  • Enter the contest by submitting your caption as a comment on FOTM (scroll down), not via email or on Facebook.
  • The winner of the Caption Contest will get a gorgeous Award Certificate of Excellence and a year’s free subscription to FOTM! :D
  • FOTM writers will vote for the winner.
  • Any captions proffered by FOTM writers, no matter how brilliant (ha ha), will not be considered. :(

To get the contest going, here’s my caption:

It’s not the chair that’s too big. It’s the man who’s too small.

This contest will be closed in a week, at the end of next Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014.

For the winner of our last Caption Contest, click here.

Seen any good pics that you think would be great for our Caption Contest? Email them to us! :D

fellowshipminds@gmail.com

~Eowyn

Wanna-be Portland bomber Mohamud sentenced to 30 years

mohamed2

KOMO:  A young Somali American terrorist was sentenced Wednesday to 30 years in prison for plotting to bomb Portland’s downtown square while it was filled with holiday cheer.

Prosecutors had sought a 40-year term for Mohamed Mohamud, 23, in the 2010 plot that actually was an FBI sting. But U.S. District Court Judge Garr King  (appointed by Clinton) said Mohamud’s youth and remorse for his actions helped lower his sentence.

King said he believes the actions of undercover FBI agents edged into “imperfect entrapment,” the idea that though they didn’t fully entrap Mohamud in a legal sense, their actions nonetheless encouraged him to commit wrongdoing. “This is a sad case,” King said.

Mohamud was arrested Nov. 26, 2010, after pressing a keypad button on a cellphone that he believed would trigger a massive truck bomb and kill people gathered for an annual Christmas tree-lighting event. But the bomb was a fake provided by FBI agents posing as al-Qaida recruiters.

The undercover agents made friends with Mohamud after learning he had written for an online jihadi magazine and exchanged emails with accused terrorists.

King disagreed with defense attorneys who made a last-gasp effort to portray Mohamud’s actions as those of a confused teenager who just had his braces removed when first contacted by an FBI agent posing as a member of a terrorist cell.

Mohamud chose the location and timing of the bomb, King said, and when offered the choice to commit peaceful acts of resistance, he instead told the undercover agents he wanted to “become operational.” Mohamud’s defense team said he will appeal the sentence.

The former Oregon State University student and his parents spoke before he was sentenced. “The things I said and did were terrible,” Mohamud said. “The hardest thing is to go over the (undercover agents’) tapes, to see myself, to hear what I was saying.”

His mother, Miriam Barre, begged the judge for leniency. “Give him another chance,” she said through tears on the witness stand.

His father, Osman Barre, said he has watched his waifish teenage son become an adult in prison and mature in the process. But King said Mohamud’s youth aside, the sentence had to both punish him for his actions and serve as a warning for anyone planning similar acts.

mohamedJurors rejected Mohamud’s entrapment defense at his January 2013 trial. The sentencing was pushed back a year after the government disclosed that warrantless overseas wiretaps helped make its case. The defense unsuccessfully sought a new trial.

Lead prosecutor Ethan Knight has said prosecutors sought the lengthy term because Mohamud never wavered or hesitated in his willingness to kill people on the day of his arrest.

Chief Federal Public Defender Stephen Sady said 40 years would be “draconian,” and asked for King to impose no more than 10 years. Sady said Mohamud has shown remorse and has been doing everything he can while in prison to become a better person. He contends Mohamud had no plans to carry out an attack until after he met the undercover agents.

DCG

Troops not eligible for campaign medal in fight against ISIS

 

obama-fingerThe Hill: The troops President Obama has deployed to Iraq are not eligible for certain medals because the U.S. has not officially designated their efforts a military campaign.

The more than 1,600 troops who are serving as “advisers” cannot receive the Iraq Campaign Medal, which is reserved for troops deployed between March 19, 2003, and Dec. 31, 2011, defense officials say.

Nor are they eligible for the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary or Service medals, which are only awarded to troops supporting Operation Enduring Freedom, originating with the 2001 Afghanistan War.

Veterans groups are upset over the exclusions, arguing the battle against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS or ISIL) should be treated as an extension of previous military campaigns. “If that’s not a terrorist organization, and this is not a war against ISIL, then I don’t know what this is,” said John Bircher, spokesman for the Military Order of the Purple Heart, who is also a Vietnam War veteran and Purple Heart recipient.

Advocates for veterans say the issue needs to be resolved swiftly. “Having just recently retired, I know how things like this mean to the troops that are out there doing their part. So creating a ribbon, getting something at least started, would be a step in the right direction,” said Navy Cmdr. Daniel Dolan, who is also a professor at the Naval War College.

The Pentagon says there is a process for medal eligibility. It begins with the military campaign being given an official designation and the combatant commander requesting that the operation be approved for awards.

“Should U.S. Service members be deployed to Iraq under a new named operation, DOD has policy in place that allows the U.S. Central Command Commander to request the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness approve the new operation for award of the GWOT-[Expeditionary Medal] and GWOT-[Service Medal],” Defense officials told The Hill on June 26.

The ISIS campaign has not yet received an official designation, and one does not appear to be in the works. “I know of no plans at this point to name it,” Pentagon press secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby said last week.

Defense officials said they are sorting through what awards might be available to the advisers in Iraq. “The department is currently working with U.S. Central Command regarding awards and decorations for those conducting operations in Iraq and Syria. No decisions have yet been made,” said Pentagon spokesman Navy Lt. Cmdr. Nate Christensen on Monday.

Dolan said it was unusual for a military campaign to not have a name at this stage. “That’s usually one of the first things, you give it a name: Operation Desert Shield, Operation Allied Force, Operation Enduring Freedom. … I would hope somebody’s working on that as well,” he said.

“The troops are asking the same question. There are soldiers, sailors, and airmen out there wondering ‘What do we call this?’ … It would help,” he said, “to give it a bit more meaning for the folks fighting it, if they know it has a particular name and it is recognized as a unique campaign.”

Dolan said the lack of clarity on medals could reflect the fast-moving nature of U.S. involvement in Iraq, which started in mid-June, with the deployment of 270 troops to provide security for U.S. diplomatic personnel and facilities.

Today, the U.S. is leading an international coalition against ISIS that has conducted more than 300 airstrikes against targets in Iraq and Syria.

At the same time, the president has pledged not to send “American combat troops to fight on foreign soil,” leading to confusion over whether the forces are considered “combat troops.” Many of the troops serving there are infantry soldiers and Marines.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel acknowledged that the troops are serving in a combat zone, and defense officials have said they are receiving “combat pay.”

Administration officials had been reluctant to call the effort against ISIS a war. Obama declined to use the term in an interview Sunday on “60 Minutes,” instead calling it a “counterterrorism” operation.

Lt. Gen. David Barno, a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, said the administration has acknowledged the U.S. is at war. “We are conducting lethal combat operations, certainly from the air, against ISIS in two different countries right now, and providing a lot of support to include advisers and potentially [Joint Terminal Attack Controllers] on the ground to help disrupt, destroy and defeat and eventually kill these guys.” “So that sounds a lot like war to me,” Barno said.

Bircher said he expects troops injured in Iraq would be eligible for the Purple Heart, even though the awards are reserved for wounds suffered in combat.

Barno said it’s possible the Defense Department could resolve the medal issue with an Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, which it has awarded for limited-duration contingency operations, such as the U.S. military invasions in Grenada and Panama. “It remains to be seen which way the Defense Department goes on that,” he said.

FYI – Combat pay (hostile fire and imminent danger pay) is an additional $225/month  and is tax-free.

DCG

The “Little Flower” – St. Therese of the Child Jesus

Today is the feast day of one of my most favorite saints: St. Thérèse of Lisieux, better known as St. Thérèse of the Little Flower. FOTM, therefore, is re-publishing Joan’s post from last year in honor of this lovely soul.

~Eowyn

St. Thérèse of Lisieux at age 24

My first introduction to the Saints came from my beautiful mother, Mary Agnes, when I was a five-year-old girl.  She took my hand and asked me to sit on the chrome kitchen stool that had red vinyl on the top of it.  She brought over to me a book called, “The Treasure Book.”  She said that she wanted to teach me about the Saints in heaven, and especially about one lady whom she admired and loved.  We looked at the book together and she came to the page that she wanted, as I awaited with excitement.  My mother paged to “The Little Flower,” whose Feast Day we celebrate today, October 1st.  I looked at all of the lovely pictures.  My mother then read to me the Little Flower’s life story and told me something that I will always remember, and have remembered, all of my life.  My mother said to never forget St. Therese’s “Little Way,” to do all things, no matter how small, with great love, and your actions will rise to heaven to Jesus, making Him very happy.  My mother served as a wonderful example to me of the “Little Way” as I have been trying to model my life after it.

St. Therese was born on January 2, 1873, the youngest of five children, to Louis Martin, a watchmaker of Alencon and Azelie-Marie Guerin, a maker of point d’Alencon (lace and fabric).  She enjoyed a very happy childhood, was highly intelligent and full of enthusiastic love of life.  She enjoyed her sisters and loved to be in plays, thoroughly enjoying acting as Joan of Arc, whom she admired very much.

In 1877, Therese’s mother died and her father sold her business at Alencon and went to live at Lisieux, so that his daughters’ aunt, Madame Guerin, could help him with his children from time to time, even though Marie, Therese’s older sister, ran the household and Pauline, the eldest sister, made herself responsible for the religious upbringing of her sisters.

Pauline entered the Carmel at Lisieux and Therese began to be drawn to that same vocation.  Therese went to the school run by the Benedictine nuns of Notre-Dame-du-Pre.  When Therese was nearly fourteen, Marie joined Pauline in the Carmel.  On Christmas Eve of that same year, Therese underwent an experience that she later referred to as her “conversion.”  She said, “On that blessed night the sweet child Jesus, scarcely an hour old, filled the darkness of my soul with floods of light.  By becoming weak and little, for love of me, He made me strong and brave; He put His own weapons into my hands so that I went on from strength to strength, beginning, if I may say so, ‘to run as a giant.’ “

During the next year, Therese told her father that she also wanted to enter Carmel, but because she was 14, the Carmelites and the Bishop of Bayeux refused to hear of her desires because she was too young.  A few months later, being in Rome with her father, Therese visited with Pope Leo XIII, saying to the Pope, “In honor of your jubilee, allow me to enter Carmel at fifteen.”  Pope Leo was impressed with Therese, but upheld her superiors’ decision and told her, “You shall enter if it be God’s will,” dismissing her with kindness.  But at the end of the year, Biship Hugonin gave his permission to Therese, and she entered the Carmel at Lisieux, professing on September 8, 1890.  A few days before she professed, she wrote this to Pauline, known as Mother Agnes-of-Jesus:

“Before setting out my Betrothed asked me which way and through what country I would travel.  I replied that I had only one wish: to reach the height of the mountain of Love….Then our Savior took me by the hand and led me into a subterranean way, where it is neither hot nor cold, where the sun never shines, where neither rain nor wind find entrance: a tunnel where I see nothing but a half-veiled light, the brightness shining from the eyes of Jesus looking down….I wish at all costs to win the palm of St. Agnes.  If it cannot be by blood it must be by love….”

One of the principal duties of a Carmelite nun is to pray for priests, which St. Therese did with great fervor and devotion, carrying out also the austere lifestyle of the Carmelite Order.  In 1893, Therese, now 20, served to assist the novice mistress and was in fact the mistress in all but not in name.  And in that capacity, she said:

“From afar it seems easy to do good to souls, to make them love God more, to mold them according to our own ideas and views.  But coming closer we find, on the contrary, that to do good without God’s help is as impossible as to make the sun shine at night….What costs me most is being obliged to observe every fault and smallest imperfection and wage deadly war against them.”  During this time with the novices under her care, inspired by the Word of God and inspired by the Gospel to place love at the center of everything, she discovered the “Little Way” of spiritual childhood and taught it to the novices.

Therese’s sister, Celine, cared for their Father who died in 1894.  Thereafter, Celine also entered Carmel.  In 1895, Therese wrote her first autobiographical manuscript, which she presented to Mother Agnes for her birthday on January 21, 1896.  Several months later, Therese experienced a hemorrhage at the mouth.  This happened at the same time Therese had planned to respond to help the Carmelites at Hanoi.  But the last eighteen months of her life was a time of great trial, a time of horrible suffering and spiritual darkness.  Therese said, “I have never given the good God aught but love, and it is with love that He will repay.  After my death I will let fall a shower of roses.  I will spend my Heaven in doing good upon earth.  My ‘Little Way’ is the way of spiritual childhood, the way of trust and absolute self-surrender.”  While she was suffering, she continued to write another manuscript.  Her sisters and other religious women collected her sayings.

On September 30, 1897, she said, “I am not dying, I am entering life….My God…, I love you!”  At the age of 24, Therese died.

Her teaching and example of holiness was received by not only the Catholic Church and Catholics, but by other Christians and non-Christians.  She was canonized by Pope Pius XI on May 17, 1925, having proclaimed Therese Universal Patron of the Missions, alongside St. Francis Xavier, on December 14, 1927.

“On 24 August, at the close of the Eucharistic Celebration at the Twelfth World Youth Day in Paris, in the presence of hundreds of bishops and before an immense crowd of young people from the whole world, Pope John Paul II announced his intention to proclaim Therese of the Child Jesus and of the Holy Face a Doctor of the Universal Church on World Mission Sunday, 19 October 1997.” 

Accordingly, this Little Flower serves as a Doctor of the Church with her “Little Way” to teach all men and women to love Our Lord and to give Him everything we have, to serve Him in our vocation, whatever it may be, and to do all things, no matter how small, with great love.

Sources:

The Life of Saint Therese of Lisieux, Vatican website “Holy See”

One Hundred Saints, Bulfinch Press, Compilation Copyright @ 1993 By Little, Brown and Company, Inc.

First case of Ebola in U.S. may have contacted 12-18, incl. 5 children, while showing symptoms

This is a follow-up of Steve’s post this morning on the first confirmed case of Ebola in the U.S.– a Liberian national who recently came to Dallas, Texas from Nigeria. Both Liberia and Nigeria are among the West African countries stricken by the terrible epidemic that has a 60-90% fatality rate.

The patient is identified by Liberian health officials and The Associated Press as Thomas Eric Duncan. He has been kept in isolation at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas since Sunday.

The latest:

Duncan may have infected a second man. Even worse, Duncan had come into contact with five children in five separate Dallas schools over the weekend. Altogether, Dallas health officials said today that they believe Duncan had come in contact with at least 12 to 18 people when he was experiencing symptoms and, therefore, was infectious. So far, none of his contacts has been confirmed to be infected.

Zachary ThompsonZachary Thompson

USA Today reports, Oct. 1, 2014, that the director of Dallas County Health and Human Services, Zachary Thompson, said “there may be another case that is a close associate with this particular patient. So this is real. There should be a concern, but it’s contained to the specific family members and close friends at this moment.”

Mike MilesSuperintendent Mike Miles

The AP reports, Oct. 1, 2014, that Dallas Independent School District Superintendent Mike Miles said that the five students were in school this week after possibly being in contact with the man over the weekend. But Miles says the students are showing no symptoms and are now being monitored at home. As an added precaution, Miles says additional health and custodial staff will be at the five schools the students attend.

Although the first Ebola man may have infected a second individual as well as five students, Zachary Thompson continues to insist that the public isn’t at risk because health officials have the virus contained.

Meanwhile, the New York Times reports, Oct. 1, 2014, that the infected man, Thomas Eric Duncan, arrived in the United States on Sept. 20 aboard a commercial airliner. Officials said Duncan had shown no symptoms of the disease while on the flight and that he had posed no threat to other passengers.

Duncan worked at a shipping company in Monrovia, Liberia, but had just quit his job, giving his resignation in early September, his boss said. Duncan’s neighbors in Liberia said he had gotten a visa to the United States and had decided to go. He lived alone, but has family in the United States.

Authorities also said an early opportunity to put Duncan in isolation, limiting the risk of contagion, may have been missed because of a failure to pass along critical information about his travel history. Duncan had sought medical help but was sent home, two days before he was finally admitted into the hospital.

  • Friday, Sept. 19: Duncan boards flight from Liberia.
  • Saturday, Sept. 20: Arrives in Dallas to visit family.
  • Wednesday, Sept. 24: Duncan develops symptoms of Ebola, including fever.
  • Friday, Sept. 26: Seeks care at hospital but is sent home.
  • Sunday, Sept. 28: Placed in isolation at Dallas hospital.
  • Tuesday, Sept. 30: Lab confirms Duncan has Ebola.

Unlike Director of Dallas County Health and Human Services Zachary Thompson, Texas Gov. Rick Perry is taking matters very seriously. He said at a news conference today: “This case is serious. This is all hands on deck.”

Health officials are continuing to track down other people who might have been exposed to Duncan after he began showing symptoms, and will monitor those individuals every day for 21 days — the full incubation period of the disease. Most people develop symptoms within 8 to 10 days. As a patient becomes sicker and the virus replicates in the body, the likelihood of the disease spreading grows.

Health officials insist the disease is only spread by people with symptoms, such as diarrhea or vomiting. But a 2012 Canadian research study casts doubt on that, showing that the Ebola virus could be transmitted by air across two animal species.

Ebola in West Africa

Meanwhile, The Daily Caller reports the happy news that 13,500 people from the Ebola-stricken countries of Sierra Leon, Guinea and Liberia have visas to visit the United States, according to federal data.

The data don’t show how many of those people are already in the United States, but visitors from those countries should be excluded until they can show they’re free of Ebola, said Jessica Vaughan, policy director at the Center for Immigration Studies, a group that pushes for low-scale immigration.

Under current policies, only people with obvious Ebola symptoms are excluded by border officials. But a person can be infected with the disease, and not show any symptoms, for up to 21 days.

All of which led Dr. Jesse L. Goodman, a former Food and Drug Administration chief scientist and top infectious disease specialist who’s now a professor of medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center, to say that given the exposure of several people to the Ebola virus by patient zero Duncan, it’s likely that many more will be infected.

As reported by the Washington Examiner, Dr. Goodman warns that while Americans shouldn’t panic, it’s best to prepare for the worst. He said in a statement:

“If anyone did not agree before, bringing the epidemic in Africa under control is an absolute emergency and requires a massive effort and global commitment now long overdue. This is a matter not just of preventing death and suffering in Africa, but, as this case brings home to the U.S., of global safety and security.

While there is an expectation that this case, and likely future ones, can be contained, it is important not to be overconfident and to continuously, now and in the future, reexamine both how the virus is behaving and also the public health and medical response to see what can potentially be improved.

It is critical for hospitals and health care workers everywhere to be sure they are alert, obtain travel histories and, if there is any question at all it could be Ebola, contact CDC and, while sorting things out, act to isolate a sick patient returning from an epidemic area.”

Goodman suggested that travel be limited to the area in West Africa where the epidemic is raging. “If less people traveled, risks may be reduced, and active follow-up and education of travelers could also be facilitated.”

Just wait till the U.S. soldiers — including 700 of the 101st Airborne Division who are heading to Liberia in late October — whom President Ebola is sending to “combat” the pandemic in West Africa, come home . . . .

H/t FOTM’s DCG and Anon

See also:

~Eowyn

Wednesday Howler

carter

Not especially

Jimmy Carter says he would have defeated Reagan had he been more ‘manly’

By Paul Bedard | October 1, 2014 | 10:58 am

Via  washingtonexaminer.com:

Former President Jimmy Carter claimed Wednesday that he would have been re-elected and beaten Ronald Reagan in 1980 if had been more “manly” in his dealings with Iran.

Interviewed by the show “CNBC Meets,” Carter repeated his belief that the failed mission to free American hostages held in Tehran killed his chances, but then added that had he gone to war, America would have rewarded him with a second term in 1980.

“I could’ve been re-elected if I’d taken military action against Iran, shown that I was strong and resolute and, um, manly and so forth,” said the former president, who has established himself as a world human rights leader.

“I could have wiped Iran off the map with the weapons that we had, but in the process a lot of innocent people would have been killed, probably including the hostages and so I stood up against all that all that advice, and then eventually my prayers were answered and every hostage came home safe and free. And so I think I made the right decision in retrospect, but it was not easy at the time,” he said, according to a transcript provided to Secrets.

Interviewed with his wife, Carter said he also had to ignore Rosalynn’s pleadings to “do something.”

In the end, she said that she was proud of her husband. “Peace is very difficult. War is popular in our country,” said Mrs. Carter.

Paul Bedard, the Washington Examiner’s “Washington Secrets” columnist, can be contacted at pbedard@washingtonexaminer.com.

-End

This story was originally posted here.

Today just happens to be Jihad Jimmy’s 90th birthday.

He is also the longest surviving ex-president in history.

It shows.

-Dave

Ebola Is Here. It’s In Dallas. Yup, Let’s Just Keep Letting Them In.

Dear President Obama, As Columbus has been remembered by your liberal puke friends for genocide. So  shall you for allowing only God knows what into this country in the way of infectious diseases. That will be your legacy in 500 years.

God forgives, the dead and dying might find that a little harder to do.————————————————————————————-

images

Updated: October 1, 2014 8:43 AM

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2014/09/30/cdc-confirms-patient-in-dallas-has-the-ebola-virus/

CDC Confirms Patient In Dallas Has Ebola Virus

DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have confirmed that a person in Dallas definitely has the Ebola virus. Tuesday’s official determination makes the patient, now isolated at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, the first diagnosed Ebola case in the United States.

Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Texas Department of State Health Services, Presbyterian Hospital and Dallas County Health and Human Services all participated in a Tuesday afternoon press conference. CDC Director Thomas Frieden related the information that the individual who tested positive had traveled to Liberia. The person left Liberia on September 19 and arrived in the United States on September 20 with no virus symptoms. Frieden said that it was four or five days later that the patient, who is believed to be male, began developing symptoms and was ultimately admitted to Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas on Sunday, September 28.

Ebola Patient’s Arrival In North Texas

“We received in our laboratory today specimens from the individual, tested them, and they tested positive for Ebola,” Frieden stated. “The State of Texas also operates a laboratory that found the same results.” After the confirmation statement, Frieden went on to stress that the testing for Ebola is very accurate, saying that it is a PCR test of blood.

As far as the medical condition of the infected patient, Frieden said that he “is critically ill at this point.” Presbyterian Hospital would not confirm the condition of the individual, citing the patient’s right to privacy. CBS 11 News learned late Tuesday evening that the man is communicating with health workers and telling them when he is hungry.

The patient is in a special isolation section of the Intensive Care Unit and is being watched through glass walls. Officials said that an important part of his treatment is making sure that he is well hydrated.

An Exclusive Look Inside Isolation Rooms

After confirmation of the virus, the City of Dallas was put on Level 2: High Readiness. The city is now working closely with DCHHS and the CDC.

Doctors said that the patient will remain in North Texas and be treated at Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Frieden expained why that decision was made, saying that almost every hospital in the U.S. with isolation facilities can do isolation for Ebola. “We don’t see a need, from either a medical or a infection control standpoint, to try and move the patient,” he said.

DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have confirmed that a person in Dallas definitely has the Ebola virus. Tuesday’s official determination makes the patient, now isolated at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, the first diagnosed Ebola case in the United States.

Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Texas Department of State Health Services, Presbyterian Hospital and Dallas County Health and Human Services all participated in a Tuesday afternoon press conference. CDC Director Thomas Frieden related the information that the individual who tested positive had traveled to Liberia. The person left Liberia on September 19 and arrived in the United States on September 20 with no virus symptoms. Frieden said that it was four or five days later that the patient, who is believed to be male, began developing symptoms and was ultimately admitted to Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas on Sunday, September 28.

Ebola Patient’s Arrival In North Texas

“We received in our laboratory today specimens from the individual, tested them, and they tested positive for Ebola,” Frieden stated. “The State of Texas also operates a laboratory that found the same results.” After the confirmation statement, Frieden went on to stress that the testing for Ebola is very accurate, saying that it is a PCR test of blood.

As far as the medical condition of the infected patient, Frieden said that he “is critically ill at this point.” Presbyterian Hospital would not confirm the condition of the individual, citing the patient’s right to privacy. CBS 11 News learned late Tuesday evening that the man is communicating with health workers and telling them when he is hungry.

The patient is in a special isolation section of the Intensive Care Unit and is being watched through glass walls. Officials said that an important part of his treatment is making sure that he is well hydrated.

An Exclusive Look Inside Isolation Rooms

After confirmation of the virus, the City of Dallas was put on Level 2: High Readiness. The city is now working closely with DCHHS and the CDC.

Doctors said that the patient will remain in North Texas and be treated at Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. Frieden expained why that decision was made, saying that almost every hospital in the U.S. with isolation facilities can do isolation for Ebola. “We don’t see a need, from either a medical or a infection control standpoint, to try and move the patient,” he said.

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~Steve~      Buckle up my friends, cause I think this could get ugly.